Pennsylvania
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A nice read on the effect of Amazon - beyond it's evisceration of B&M retailers:

The Amazon Effect
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Erik Henry
United States
Houston
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
I'm not going to read the linked article unless it gets at least 4-1/2 stars.
7 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Pennsylvania
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Erik17 wrote:
I'm not going to read the linked article unless it gets at least 4-1/2 stars.


and comes with free shipping?

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J.D. Hall
United States
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
Personally, I found the Calvin Klein streaming commercial to be, ahem, far more eye-catching and enjoyable....

It's interesting, but kind of a no-brainer if you've ever actually worked in retail and/or the private sector. Staying abreast or ahead of innovations in the industry, be it technological or personnel, is imperative to staying relevant and profitable. Take my old industry -- newspapers. They dug a big hole by at first refusing to take series them damn "interwebs," then when they did get into it, they had not a clue about what they were doing or when they should charge and when should it be free. As a result, people walk around reading their "devices" and these aren't linked to (in most cases) traditional journalism outlets. Yet, the newspapers still keep digging that hole deeper.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fightcitymayor
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
"This is a really weird game, and you’ll find that most people will not want to play this."
Avatar
mb
remorseless1 wrote:
It's interesting, but kind of a no-brainer if you've ever actually worked in retail and/or the private sector. Staying abreast or ahead of innovations in the industry, be it technological or personnel, is imperative to staying relevant and profitable.
I would push back and say it is important, but never before has it become so necessary or so broad. Take metalworking: The same techniques (give or take) would have served an apprentice blacksmith in 1850 BC as in 1850 AD. Farming, woodworking, cooking, construction, and a thousand other skilled trades survived over the centuries (and millenia) via incremental improvements that anyone could attempt. And if one town had a blacksmith, then you moved one town over and set up shop there. Opportunity was A) approachable and B) obtainable.

Fast forward to today, and both artisanal as well as simple tasks have been automated out of existence. So not only are there no opportunities in your town, there aren't any opportunities two towns over either. And to take part in calling the shots in a robotic automated world requires education that many won't be able to accomplish. You are no longer competing just with the locals, you have to be able to do what you do on a global scale. So in the past, the best stayed current, but that left a huge sea of workers that could get by even if they weren't at the vanguard of tech progress.

I hate to sound like a luddite, but with every year we get further & further away from a human condition that average people can succeed in. And that is different from previous eras.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric "Shippy McShipperson" Mowrer
United States
Vancouver
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Ami. Geek.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fightcitymayor wrote:
remorseless1 wrote:
It's interesting, but kind of a no-brainer if you've ever actually worked in retail and/or the private sector. Staying abreast or ahead of innovations in the industry, be it technological or personnel, is imperative to staying relevant and profitable.
I would push back and say it is important, but never before has it become so necessary or so broad. Take metalworking: The same techniques (give or take) would have served an apprentice blacksmith in 1850 BC as in 1850 AD. Farming, woodworking, cooking, construction, and a thousand other skilled trades survived over the centuries (and millenia) via incremental improvements that anyone could attempt. And if one town had a blacksmith, then you moved one town over and set up shop there. Opportunity was A) approachable and B) obtainable.

Fast forward to today, and both artisanal as well as simple tasks have been automated out of existence. So not only are there no opportunities in your town, there aren't any opportunities two towns over either. And to take part in calling the shots in a robotic automated world requires education that many won't be able to accomplish. You are no longer competing just with the locals, you have to be able to do what you do on a global scale. So in the past, the best stayed current, but that left a huge sea of workers that could get by even if they weren't at the vanguard of tech progress.

I hate to sound like a luddite, but with every year we get further & further away from a human condition that average people can succeed in. And that is different from previous eras.


We have a choice to make. Star Trek or 1984. Eventually robots will be able to do nearly all the jobs, including building and maintaining more robots and mining the resources required to sustain themselves. At some point between now and then, and I have a hard time wrapping my head around it myself, we're going to have to drastically change how we view labor and wealth or we'll end up with 1984 or Mad Max or some other form of dystopia. It seems hard to believe that we would ever be able to get from where we are now to Star Trek, even if labor were ubiquitous and free, without really bad things happening first.
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Leo Zappa
United States
Aliquippa
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ejmowrer wrote:
fightcitymayor wrote:
remorseless1 wrote:
It's interesting, but kind of a no-brainer if you've ever actually worked in retail and/or the private sector. Staying abreast or ahead of innovations in the industry, be it technological or personnel, is imperative to staying relevant and profitable.
I would push back and say it is important, but never before has it become so necessary or so broad. Take metalworking: The same techniques (give or take) would have served an apprentice blacksmith in 1850 BC as in 1850 AD. Farming, woodworking, cooking, construction, and a thousand other skilled trades survived over the centuries (and millenia) via incremental improvements that anyone could attempt. And if one town had a blacksmith, then you moved one town over and set up shop there. Opportunity was A) approachable and B) obtainable.

Fast forward to today, and both artisanal as well as simple tasks have been automated out of existence. So not only are there no opportunities in your town, there aren't any opportunities two towns over either. And to take part in calling the shots in a robotic automated world requires education that many won't be able to accomplish. You are no longer competing just with the locals, you have to be able to do what you do on a global scale. So in the past, the best stayed current, but that left a huge sea of workers that could get by even if they weren't at the vanguard of tech progress.

I hate to sound like a luddite, but with every year we get further & further away from a human condition that average people can succeed in. And that is different from previous eras.


We have a choice to make. Star Trek or 1984. Eventually robots will be able to do nearly all the jobs, including building and maintaining more robots and mining the resources required to sustain themselves. At some point between now and then, and I have a hard time wrapping my head around it myself, we're going to have to drastically change how we view labor and wealth or we'll end up with 1984 or Mad Max or some other form of dystopia. It seems hard to believe that we would ever be able to get from where we are now to Star Trek, even if labor were ubiquitous and free, without really bad things happening first.


Agreed. The pace of scientific and technological advancement is outstripping our ability as a society to intellectually assimilate the meaning of these advances. We need to find a path to adjust our economic systems to accommodate these shifts, but if human history is any indicator, these shifts will be messy with a lot of pain and economic displacement before things settle back into a new pattern. Before long there are going to be an awful lot of people sitting around with nothing productive to do. What is going to happen to all of those people? Even if a UBI is instituted, and there are a lot of hurdles to overcome before that happens, what happens to peoples' sense of self-worth? Most people still derive satisfaction and fulfillment from their work. Take that away, and what do you have? What will be the future of our society when the last brick and mortar store closes, and we all sit in our homes all day long waiting for the next drone delivery of our various and sundry goods?
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gudjon Torfi Sigurdsson
Iceland
Isafjordur
Isafjardarbaer
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This one is interesting as well. It's got a rating.

Why Amazon is eating the world
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tor Sverre Lund
Norway
Trondheim
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Man, those five-and-a-half-and-a-half ratings are near impossible to get!

Great reads, btw. Very interesting.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.