Norman Withers
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The rules state that in order to create a Hoplite or a Galley, one must use a Population Cube from a Polis.

So my question is, are Hoplites and Galleys considered Population Cubes for the purpose of supply? I.e. do they require wheat to sustain?

It seems extraordinarily odd that in a game full of decisions where one must balance pros and cons, Hoplites and Galleys don't require any supply. It also doesn't make any sense from a realism standpoint - Armies still require food.

Please help - Thank you!
 
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In the game, Hoplites and Galleys are neither considered Population Cubes nor do they need food.
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Norman Withers
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Odd.

That seems like a design error to me.
 
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Each to their own.

There is a possible realistic reason as to why hoplites and galleys are not considered population.
Population, in the game, is a metaphor for prosperity. Troops outside a city will not directly contribute to that city's prosperity and wealth. They will have done so, as long as they did not join the army, leaving the city to fight for higher ideals (i.e. the League) elsewhere, however.

There also is a possible reason regarding the supply situation. Armies and troops marching through the country could have supplied themselves. The country is not void of any population except the poleis, so in between these there are settlements, fields, etc. It is quite possible that areas being part of the domain of one poleis or other were ordered to supply the armies moving through. In hostile environment they could have as easily taken what they needed. Also, the ressources taken from any territory are just a tithe, not the whole production of said territory. It is therefore possible that territories would have produced enough to supply the armies within.

I am not too familiar with the Peloponnesian Wars, but I know the author has put a great deal of thought into his design. If supply for troops and galleys would have to be handled differently, and it is NOT in the game, then I'd bet half of my collection it is not an error - it is a deliberate decision...


[Edit]
Polis is not a simulation, it is a game designed to lean heavily on a specific subject. As such, the game is the important part, not the historical accuracy...
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Norman Withers
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You make some valid points.

And the movement of armies costing prestige supports your argument that the armies are "living off the land" whenever they move. The reduction in prestige representing the consternation of the the villagers who have to supply said force?

I still think a design element representing "supply," whether in the form of prestige or wheat is more authentic, but /shrug.

Perhaps if you were allowed to convert hoplites and galley's back into population cubes and then into hoplites/galleys in the following turn - thus also representing the citizen/warriors they were, that would make up for needing to pay wheat/prestige for them. Because then those pieces could also be used as population cubes.
 
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