Phil Seale
United States
Indiana
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I finally had to give up in solving this case after going on the side quest chain that bogged me down. After reading Holmes's solution and following his leads, it made perfect sense.

My question is - How did Holmes know to go to Somerset House after the asylum? Had I just done that, I would've crushed this mystery. Instead I feel like a complete failure.....
 
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Bob Vosper
United States
Seattle
Washington
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Just played this scenario over the weekend and really enjoyed it. We decided to go there after the family portrait was mentioned at Goldfire's house. Thought maybe there was something to the two boys mentioned.
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Eric Spiegel
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
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In my mind Holmes got a sense that the Goldfire who visited in the introduction was not who he said he was (he called Watson by his name rather than "Worton", and Watson's observance of his personality changes). This combined with differing handwriting between the suspect list and the suicide note tells Holmes that we have an imposter who looks just like the real Goldfire. Hence a possible twin brother, hence Holmes' decision to check the birth records at Somerset.

It took us the visit to Goldfire's house to make the twin brother leap but I can definitely see Holmes' line of thinking here.

Don't worry about feeling like a failure, we only got 20 points on this case but whenever we get positive points we consider it a success.
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Pee di Moor
Netherlands
Rotterdam
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Phil, maybe also read this thread
 
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Lou Lessing
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rabidroadkill wrote:

My question is - How did Holmes know to go to Somerset House after the asylum? Had I just done that, I would've crushed this mystery. Instead I feel like a complete failure.....


Sherlock Holmes cheats like a motherfucker in basically every solution. Until you give it a little bit of thought, it's annoying and maybe even seems like a mistake, but it isn't: it's a flavor thing.

Your characters are the "Baker Street Irregulars", basically a little gang of wannabes that follow Sherlock Holmes around. You follow the clues to where they lead you like a good detectives. Sometimes you trust your gut on something, sometimes it pays off, sometimes not. You take your time, try to be thorough, do your best. Sherlock Holmes, meanwhile, goes running off half-cocked chasing some half-mad intuition that doesn't make any sense to us mortals and, of course, it always turns out to be right because he's Sherlock Holmes and he's always right. Bastard.

It's supposed to be frustrating. Sherlock Holmes is a frustrating man to work with.

It isn't really feasible to beat him in the main mystery most of the time. Score-wise, you can make a lot of points back from completing side quests, which he skips entirely, but if you want to compete with him on locations visited, you'll have to play the game like he does. Guess a lot more, take much bigger leaps of faith, and maybe get a feel for some of the meta elements of how the authors construct the cases.
 
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Agnese K
Latvia
Riga
Riga
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I do not think this was impossible to figure out especially if you take a different route (and gain extra points for second series of questions).

Our first case was this one, so we followed a lot of bad leads - our primary goal was to explore the game, not beat Holmes. But the part where we got stuck was exactly Sommerset House. And the only way to move forward for us was to make this leap of logic ourselves. We took a day's break and figured it out the next day

We had a lot more lead than one (like the taxi one, because it makes sense to follow Dr.), but if you think about it, you can establish a few rock solid things even from the asylum lead only. 1. All of this is a set up (If it wasn't, it would not make much of a fun case now, would it?). 2. If this was a set up, there has to be a killer. 3. Killer won't write himself on the list (Killer wrote both the suicide note and list of "possible killers" because handwriting checks + it is totally OK to be happy about death of your colleagues.) 4. If there is a killer, something fishy is is going on with poor Dr.

All you have to do is figure out what is the only solution that could explain fishy actions of the doctor? We came up with three things - He was hypnotized? - unlikely. He went bonkers? - he seems pretty sane. Or maaaybe he has a twin brother? :O Probably you can imagine our feels of victory when we finally went to Sommerset house.
 
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Joe Karlovsky
United States
Illinois
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First and only case I’ve done so far. LOVE the structure and creativity. Did it Solo, took 3 hours (with some distractions), scored 10 Points. I agree that i visited way more leads than necessary to get a feel for those Informants. Although guess which one I didn’t visit...the damn taxi hub!

There’s really no way to have guessed the side-story killer, right? That was the only part that was unsatisfying. But that’s what it’s about, just guessing at some point.

The scoring system is my least favorite part. I don’t want to only do 6 leads and get it right, besting Holmes. The text is really great, even the dead-end ones. I want to read as much as possible.

Sooooo looking forward to doing the next cases and then sharing the game with friends.
 
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