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Pacific Fury: Guadalcanal, 1942» Forums » Rules

Subject: Initiative track rss

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Eric H
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The initiative track goes to +3 for the Americans and +2 for the Japanese. But how would either side get to those maximums?

As I understand it, the only thing that shifts the initiative marker are transport (or Tokyo express) landings.

There are two landing units. You only get the landing units if the initiative favors the other player (or, if it is 0, they go to the U.S. player.

How would Japan go from -1 to +2 with only two transports? If they get to +1, which they can do in a turn, the U.S. then gets the transports back.

I suspect there is one extra space on each side of the track, but if that is not the case, I would love to hear how it is done.

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Lance McMillan
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While the island is US controlled the Initiative track will automatically progress one level in the US player's favor at the end of any turn in which the island has not been "suppressed" (e.g. Initiative marker has not been flipped over due to a successful IJN aerial or shore bombardment). This same situation occurs in the Japanese player's favor if he controls the island.

Additionally, as you've already noted, if you are the non-initiative player, you have two opportunities to land troops on the island via convoy each turn using the transports (the Japanese can use the Tokyo Express option for one of these). If the island is suppressed and both convoys are landed that will shift the Initiative marker two points in the non-Initiative player's favor.

So on Turn 1, where the initiative begins at +1US, if the Japanese somehow manage to suppress the island and land both convoys the Initiative marker will shift two points, down to +1IJN. Thus the Japanese will have dramatically "seized the initiative." Thereafter, assuming they can keep the US from successfully landing any convoys, the Initiative marker will shift one point each turn in their favor (but, since it tops out at +2IJN, that's as far as it'll go).

Does that make sense?
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roger miller
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Lance has a mostly good answer.

If the Japanese seize the initiative it will only continue to go up the track to the +2 box if they prevent the Americans from suppressing the island. Landing is only possible for the Americans if the island is suppressed and that would push the track back in American favor,

One other thing shifts the track. If either side lose a transport in combat, not the Tokyo express, the marker shifts one in the other sides favor.




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Eric H
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Thanks for the quick (and clear) reply Lance / Roger. I'm usually much better on rules, especially after two runs through the game. Somehow, I stopped reading after the first para of 11.0 and missed both of the points you made. blush

This obviously makes it a much more interesting game, and it was plenty interesting already. It also answers the next question I was going to answer: why doesn't the Japanese player try and move the track to 0 and wait for turn 4 to shift it 1 in his favor. (I now see that this would not be a wise strategy!)

Best,
Eric
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roger miller
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Also note that the event table is only rolled on by the side that does not have the initiative, It is pretty strong, especially the Japanese events and tends to also swing the game back towards balance.
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