Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
20 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Design

Subject: Ideas for Unusual Ways of Publishing? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
Hi people!

You've already read the question I guess, but let me clarify.
Aside from the traditional routes of going to a publisher or even using Kickstarter, what are other ways to get a game out?

I'm a big fan of Patreon and creating games that can be expanded without limits, being able to add more and more content.

I thought about using Tabletop Simulator, offering a game there for free and then asking people to support it on Patreon.

Print & Play was another option but you can't really guarantee a good visual quality since not everybody has a good printer at home. Also the sturdiness of the pieces would be crap since it will probably be printed on regular paper.

Can you think of any other, unusual way to publish a game? The focus should be on keeping as much control over its creative process and maybe using a service like Patreon so a constant expansion of content can be kept up?

Would like to hear your ideas!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Harper
United Kingdom
Wantage
Oxfordshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well, Matthew Dunstan and Brett Gilbert are publishing a free PnP game each month through Good Little Games, supported by a Patreon. They're not exactly getting rich through this, but it's producing some decent games, and I wouldn't be surprised if some of the games move up to being published through traditional paths (at least a couple of older GLG titles were picked up by publishers).
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
Interesting. This seems to be a fitting way to do it with really small games, but I was thinking about something more "major" with more detailed graphics and so on, where a player would probably want some more quality than what your standard home printer can deliver.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Make games using existing components which players already have (or might already have), e.g. standard 8x8 checkerboards, disks/checkers, standard playing cards, dice, Looney pyramids, etc. A lot of good abstract strategy games are web-published this way.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
This makes sense for more abstract games as you said, but I had something more elaborate in mind where the graphical representation is more important.

But I guess the only real option here is to go full digital if a constant and easy content expansion is wanted. :-\
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dylan Thurston
United States
Ann Arbor
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A few museums distribute games through their gift shops, and sometimes commission specific games.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeremy Peet
United States
Milford
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Way Out There...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Print on Demand from places like Drive Through Cards and the Gamecrafter.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeremy Lennert
United States
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
When distributing physical games, packaging and shipping are non-trivial costs. If you want to do a large number of incremental updates, that's going to push you towards digital.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
SAKURA in KYOTO 2018 Back to Kansai
England
York
North Yorkshire
flag msg tools
admin
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've yet to see anyone use Amazon as a process, but they should be able to do something like this. Through an Amazon shop front, a seller can have the product manufactured, shipped, warehoused and distributed, all without having seen the finished product. As long as you're happy with the procurement process, Amazon should be able to handle the entire end to end process.

But I've never seen any game publisher do this. I wonder if there are similar web platforms. This might be the unusual path you are looking for.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gordon Dankberg
United States
Carlsbad
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I know there are a number of war game magazines that include copies of new games in their issues... maybe find a publication themed around your game and approach them with the idea. A friend of mine is publishing a pretty elaborate board game this way with a large number of heavy cardboard tokens and a complex board. Very impressive looking game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
roger miller
United States
California
flag msg tools
publisher
Are you not considering self funding it? I emptied my small 401K to start Revolution Games and am very happy I went that route instead of Kickstarter, Print on Demand, or Print and Play which were the other options I saw at that time. (2011)

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
First let me thank you all for your feedback! Some interesting ideas among it.

I've actually taken a more indepth look at some Print&Play games yesterday and was actually stunned how elaborate some of these look. Until now I've always thought that people only release games this way that are extremly basic and abstract, but I was wrong it seems.

Print&Play would actually be the ideal route for me because I can update the game whenever I want easily and I can even change and adjust already existing and published game elements and players just have to print the latest version.

And I guess everybody knows someone who has atleast a somewhat capable printer at home so the quality is not totally abyssmal, which was my biggest concern with this way of doing it.

I think I will consider trying it in conjunction with a service like Patreon.

Thanks again guys!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adrian Pillai
France
Paris
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Flip of the original question, has producing a very slick / best version of a PnP ever resulted in other gamers approaching that individual fan to produce (for a fee) another as slick copy for them?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pelle Nilsson
Sweden
Linköping
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
My 9yo really likes the free pnp Goblin Slayer that I discovered a few weeks ago. Yesterday he introduced one of his friends to it and they played at least three times and seemed to really have fun.

Printed lots of Hero Kids and played with my kids too in the last few years. A RPG technically, but very close to a tactical print'n'play boardgame. Also used some of the stand-ups for playing Goblin Slayer.

Also played some of the games from the bgg childrens games design contests and played with my family and several of them are really good.

My print'n'play skills are just good enough to play with children or soliraire though. Not quite good enough results to play with most people (except boardgamers that are hardcore enough to not mind playing prototype-quality games...). But I can see how with a bit more care you can construct your print'n'play games to look at least as good as "real" printed games.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
@Elfboy: I'm sorry I don't quite understand what you are hinting at. Maybe it's because English isn't my first language or because I'm not as deep into the board gaming scene yet in comparison to other guys here to answer that question. :-\

Could you help me out what you mean?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adrian Pillai
France
Paris
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Hyperhead wrote:
@Elfboy: I'm sorry I don't quite understand what you are hinting at. Maybe it's because English isn't my first language or because I'm not as deep into the board gaming scene yet in comparison to other guys here to answer that question. :-\

Could you help me out what you mean?

Hi, sorry if I confused you, I might be confused myself. Just got off a 14-hour flight with minimal sleep.

Wasn't targeted specifically to you but to explain, say someone makes a great looking print and play, based on your game and design but printed on premium quality chits, cardstock, cardboard, token, custom dice etc. The whole nine yards. I was asking if anyone who has done something like that on a previous PnP has ever gotten offers to make one for another person for money. And what their answers may have been. I guess I should have posed it as a thread question of it's own in hindsight.

I was just curious, that's all. Sorry for confusion.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
@elfboy

Ah I see now what you meant!
While I have no experience in regards to whether people are willing to pay for a shiny and high-quality Print&Play game, I'm actually quite sure that this is the case.

If the digital assets look really good on their own and the mechanisms are fun, I think it would seem valuable enough to many people to actually put some effort into printing this game with high quality.

But for now this is just my wishful thinking.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aitor
Spain
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hyperhead wrote:
Print & Play was another option but you can't really guarantee a good visual quality since not everybody has a good printer at home. Also the sturdiness of the pieces would be crap since it will probably be printed on regular paper.


People with bad home printers can go to a professional copy store.

If you sleeve a paper card with a premium sleeve, along with a real poker card in the back, the resulting cards are superb quality, and the crafting cost will still be lower than the price of a physical boardgame.


If you are considering P&P, there are lots of copyleft image repositories that you can use, usually targeted to videogame developers.

However, using those assets typically will force you to license your game under a free or freeish license (GPL, Creative Commons...), or even prevent you from monetizing your own game (as with the "Non-Commercial" clause of some Creative Commons licenses).

However, as board game designing is not very profitable anyways, a freeware copyleft license is actually a good way of publishing your vanity project. You don't earn money but you also don't undergo any financial risks.

The only downside is that, as the art is already drawn, you have to think backwards: instead of developing your game first and finding art aftertwards, you have to find a good asset pool and then design a game around it.

I have done this with my game Super Voxel Raiders

Also, if you decide to pursue the non-profit route from the very beginning, you will have a chance of finding quality volunteering artists. Finding and coordinating them will still take a long time, but it is a real possibility. This way you can develop your game first and ask for art later.

I have done this with my game Vera Discordia

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Felix
Germany
flag msg tools
@Aitor

Thank you for your input!

I'll actually do all the artwork myself, the style is already decided on. It will be really bright and bold and cartoony. Here is a character I already fleshed out more deeply. He's called Darkbite or "The Dark Bite". Hopefully the awfully punny reference reveals itself.



1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pablo Schulman
Brazil
Belo Horizonte
Minas Gerais
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There is The Game Crafter, which is a print on demand service. And for cards you can use DriveThruCards.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.