Alex S
United States
St. Louis
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I’ve been extra busy this past week getting a design ready for a prototype event this weekend but today I had the opportunity to try out Wasteland Express Delivery Service and wanted to tell you all about it!

Context


I’ve played Wasteland Express Delivery Service two times, now. I played it once solo for learning purposes and I’ve played it once with four players. Both games used the standard game setup with one specific objective and two random objectives. I should also note that I’m a really awesome arms dealer, but if I see raiders coming, I’m just running the other way. I never won a fight against them.

Rules & Game Mechanisms

As you might have guessed from the game’s name, Wasteland Express Delivery Service is at its core a pickup and deliver game. You’re basically moving around and either buying goods or fighting raiders and taking goods from them, and then going and selling those goods to make money. Money lets you upgrade your truck and buy even more resources to sell. Yet, that’s not how you win. To win you have to complete three objectives. The first objective is always buying three ‘artifacts’ and selling them at a specific location. The other objectives will be things such as digging for treasure, picking up a nuke and moving it to another location while being harassed by raiders, or going on a vision quest with each person having a different set of small objectives to complete. Generally, though, these objectives all boil down to having enough money, or gearing up your truck well enough (by having enough money). As a result you’re mostly deciding whether you want to gear your truck towards combat or large deliveries, depending on which objectives you’re trying to finish. There’s enough choices with variable objectives and map setups and options to upgrade your truck to still make doing so interesting.

The most interesting mechanism in the game is how the player actions work. You have a certain number of pickups, deliveries, and other outpost actions you can take in a five action round, with an unlimited amount of combat and movement. Additionally, you can immediately follow a movement action with most other actions, but if you don’t, you can move faster in subsequent movement actions. It caused the action selection to be a lot more puzzley, with a lot of the gameplay choices centering on how to use your actions efficiently.

Art, Theme, & Components

Oh boy did Pandasaurus games take the production of this game to another level. We’ve got miniatures for each player and plastic resource tokens that sit on the raider trucks and plastic inserts made by Game Trayz to hold all of the dozens of chipboard pieces. They’re all high quality and did I mention that everything is covered in art to bring home the Mad Max & Fallout style post apocalyptic setting? Because everything is covered with that. Just like in Mad Max, it might make some people a little uncomfortable, but they definitely delivered on the theme. The art is solid but the graphic design is especially impressive, bringing it together into a vibrant but dirty feel that’s still entirely functional for gameplay.

My first reaction to the Game Trayz being included in the base game was that it was a bit over the top and unnecessary, but even with them setup is rather long. Retrospectively, I don’t think I would want to deal with that without some sort of solid organizational system, and I imagine most people feel similarly. While they probably bump up the cost of the product a little, it avoids a pitfall of people having a bad time with the game just because of setup.

Strategy & Replayability

As I mentioned before, there are a couple of different main strategies to go for in this game. Between that and the number of different specific choices of what to build and when to build versus going for objectives, there’s definitely some amount of replayability. The game won’t feel the same every time. There is an eight game campaign mode, but the first half seems to be just the base game with specific objectives. The second half might make it more interesting, and if not, it at least offers some fluff to the gameplay, bringing the theme home that much more. I do think the gameplay might start to feel a bit samey after a half dozen plays or so, mostly because it doesn’t have the same depth of strategy as some heavier games, but there’s plenty of fun to be had with an awesome theme before one hits that point.

Final Thoughts

Wasteland Express Delivery Service
is a nice fun pickup and deliver game in an intensely produced package, bringing the full theme of the game home to the players. And frankly, if you’re playing this game it’s either because of the really cool theme, or it should be. But it’s not just a fun theme, there’s some good gameplay there with interesting choices to be made. It’s not my personal favorite theme ever, but it’s extremely well done. I’d say that if the theme hits home for you, definitely consider picking it up, because it definitely gives the opportunity to get immersed in a very cool setting.

Thanks for taking the time to read my review!
If you enjoyed it, please pass a thumb my way!
Check out www.epicherogames.com to find all my reviews in one place!
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Ryan Morency
United States
Waterford
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I have to agree about the setup. Without that tray system I don't think I would ever play the game again.
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Pandasaurus Games
United States
New York
New York
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Odinsfury wrote:
I have to agree about the setup. Without that tray system I don't think I would ever play the game again.


It's why it's there. We were playing a prototype at Origins 2016 and it took 45 minutes for us to set the game up. We all kind of looked at each other and knew we needed a solution.
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Alex S
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stooge wrote:
Odinsfury wrote:
I have to agree about the setup. Without that tray system I don't think I would ever play the game again.


It's why it's there. We were playing a prototype at Origins 2016 and it took 45 minutes for us to set the game up. We all kind of looked at each other and knew we needed a solution.


Like I said in the review, I definitely think it was the right choice even if I was skeptical at first glance.
 
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Randy Dickens II
United States
Canton
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The trays are one of the main reasons I purchased the game. The speed of setup/takedown means quite a bit to me. I hope you do this with other large games in the future.
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Christi K
United States
Puyallup
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Are the Game Trayz in the retail version as well?
 
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Matt Riddle
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Oxford
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clmdvd wrote:
Are the Game Trayz in the retail version as well?


Yes. There only ever was one version
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