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Subject: I was going to boycott the NFL... rss

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Ben Foy
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Because they black-listed Kaepernick. I hate that because he could obviously help a team and what he did wasn't bad enough to justify this treatment. But after Trump's tweets...

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For me, it was the rampant domestic violence that is often ignored
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Oliver
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Seems to be a bad generalization of a large group of people. How many makes a rampant?
 
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OliverOil wrote:
Seems to be a bad generalization of a large group of people. How many makes a rampant?


More in response to the league's unwillingness to address it, and then doing so in an inconsistent manner once they were pressured into it.

Here is a list of arrests

https://www.usatoday.com/sports/nfl/arrests/

here is a list of players accused of sexual/physical assault over the past few years

https://broadly.vice.com/en_us/article/8qwpm4/2015-nfl-repor...

I think I saw that 200 players is 23% of of the league, so that makes about 870 players in the league. So the rate of being accused of assault is 44/870 = 5%

Just a quick search found 1,281,290 arrests among men in the US (from FBI data) for rape, forcible assault, and simple assault. The are about 110 million men 20+ in the US, so the general rate in the population is about 1%.

So, 5 times as much in the NFL as in the general population. Even if a large number of accusations are false, it is still likely going to outstrip the general population. Seems problematic to me.

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Oliver
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"Accused"
 
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Derry Salewski
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Their shitty app is a better reason to boycott
 
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Erik Henry
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I had not been watching much for the last couple of years mostly due to the blood-sport/CTE issues (although domestic violence figured in too). At least at the NFL level they get paid. But at the youth, high school, and college levels--all those kids dreaming of the NFL while destroying their brains--that was too much for me....But yeah, Trump had me glued to the TV Sunday.
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Seth Smith
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SpaceGhost wrote:
For me, it was the rampant domestic violence that is often ignored


I used to think MLB did it the right way but now that I'm thinking about it their handling of it makes me uncomfortable too.
 
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Dwayne Hendrickson
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Making football great again, is there NOTHING that Trump can't do?
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Christopher Yaure
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Similar to Erik, and following the decision of one of my sons, I stopped watching all levels of football due to the head injuries/CTE.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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"I'm against football, but because Trump is against football, I am watching it!"

That is, you let the President choose what you were going to do instead of acting rationally on your own beliefs.

Basically you're putty in his hands...
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Daniel Kearns
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BFoy wrote:
Because they black-listed Kaepernick. I hate that because he could obviously help a team and what he did wasn't bad enough to justify this treatment. But after Trump's tweets...



Don't worry tho, Kaep is still black-listed and the NFL is still one of the shittiest and most contemptible organizations in the US.

Check out this awesome clip of Shannon Sharpe in the link from GoSteelers below.

Re: My patience ran out for the NFL today
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Erik17 wrote:
I had not been watching much for the last couple of years mostly due to the blood-sport/CTE issues (although domestic violence figured in too). At least at the NFL level they get paid. But at the youth, high school, and college levels--all those kids dreaming of the NFL while destroying their brains--that was too much for me....But yeah, Trump had me glued to the TV Sunday.


That's such a big problem because the percentage of kids that make it to the next tier is so small -- it's like an extreme funnel. Some could argue (I wouldn't agree) that the risks of CTE issues are worth millions of dollars. However, when you realize the effective probability of getting to the NFL for any given youth football player is zero, and it only increases to 1.5% if you play in the NCAA, the risks really aren't worth it.

http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/research/estimated-proba...

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Chad
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BFoy wrote:
Because they black-listed Kaepernick. I hate that because he could obviously help a team and what he did wasn't bad enough to justify this treatment. But after Trump's tweets...



Not going to get into the political side of things (because they do matter - decisiveness in a locker room is bad, or the legitimacy of his protest - but there are very legitimate reasons why signing Kaepernick would not be a great idea.

1) His skills have declined since the heyday of the NFC Championship game

2) He requires a completely different offense than most other quarterbacks - one that does not necessarily align to what other players you have on the fields (this is the same issue that plagued Tim Tebow - he clearly had skill, but it required the entire team be built around his skill set)

3) He would prove at best a temporary fix - and could mire the team is semi-permanent rebuilding mode.

All this is to say - is it really worth it for a backup quarterback? especially when you can get any number of retreds who are as skilled/pretty dam close, dont have baggage and fall in line with the preferred QM type.


Oh, and FWIW, the only reason I have been paying any attention to the NFL the last couple of years is Fantasy, which I am somewhat forced to play in every year. Much prefer to do something outside or play a board game than lose an afternoon watching a game.
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John Hathorn
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SpaceGhost wrote:
I think I saw that 200 players is 23% of of the league, so that makes about 870 players in the league. So the rate of being accused of assault is 44/870 = 5%
There is no way that number is right. There are 32 teams in the NFL, each has 53 roster spots. Certainly, most teams don't carry 53 players all season, but even if we assume a low number of 40 there would be 1280 players in the league.
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Some statistics here. https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-rate-of-domestic-vi...

Although this is still lower than the national average, it’s extremely high relative to expectations. That 55.4 percent is more than four times worse than the league’s arrest rate for all offenses (13 percent), and domestic violence accounts for 48 percent of arrests for violent crimes among NFL players, compared to our estimated 21 percent nationally.

Moreover, relative to the income level (top 1 percent) and poverty rate (0 percent) of NFL players, the domestic violence arrest rate is downright extraordinary. According to a 2002 Bureau of Justice Statistics Report covering 1993 to 1998, the domestic victimization rate for women in households with income greater than $75,000 (3.3 per 100,000) was about 39 percent of the overall rate (8.4 per 100,000), and less than 20 percent of the rate for women ages 20 to 34. That report doesn’t include cross-tabs, and it’s a little out of date (more current data is harder to find because more recent BJS reports on the issue do not include income breakdowns), but that sub-20 percent relative victimization among high-income households is consistent with the NFL’s 13 percent relative arrest rate overall (arrest disparities between income levels are probably even greater than victimization rates).

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Bah - I stand corrected on the number of players -- might have been lack of sleep induced by two small children. Apologies.


As for the Fivethirtyeight study, I have read that is potentially a substantial underestimate due to how they filtered the data --- I'll try to find the link
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SpaceGhost wrote:
Bah - I stand corrected on the number of players -- might have been lack of sleep induced by two small children. Apologies.


As for the Fivethirtyeight study, I have read that is potentially a substantial underestimate due to how they filtered the data --- I'll try to find the link


Stats is definitely your area. If you can find the link, I'd find it interesting. The author in the piece I linked seemed a bit uncertain since he wasn't that experienced at crunching criminal data.

 
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https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/more-on-the-rate-of-dom...

Follow-up on the original 538 article. Last paragraph says a lot:

Quote:
On the other hand, if you assume that the NFL’s domestic violence arrest rate should be proportional to the overall arrest rate, you can see that the NFL has a “domestic violence problem,” whether the USA Today data is complete or not. This was essentially the scenario I was leading to in my initial article.


This is worth a read if you really care

http://scholarship.law.berkeley.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?arti...

Silly to think there isn't a problem
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I've often wondered how the post-concussion syndrome plays into the domestic abuse problem.
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And here is what really frustrates me -- the NFL goes out of its way to bend the league rules on domestic violence, depending on their own "investigation"

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/08/11/nfl-frequent...

Quote:
The NFL likes to point to its policy on domestic violence as a positive step after the Ray Rice debacle, but the NFL takes so many liberties with its policy that it really isn’t a “policy” at all.


It's hard to take the NFL serious when they don't take the punishment/suspension of violations of its rules of conducts serious.
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Ken
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SpaceGhost wrote:
I think I saw that 200 players is 23% of of the league, so that makes about 870 players in the league. So the rate of being accused of assault is 44/870 = 5%


This is off. There are 32 teams, each with a 55 man roster. That's 1,760 players.

But I don't think this is actually about the statistics. For decades, the NFL's position was to sweep these things under the rug in the interest of keeping a valuable asset, er, player on the field so that tickets and advertisements got sold to reach the maximum number of people possible. It's not until we started seeing more and more video that they finally took any steps to even look into the matter, let alone address it.

We shouldn't expect football players to be saints. We should expect the NFL to recognize the importance of helping their players adjust to entering the league, dealing with the media spotlight, handling all the money, and setting higher expectations for them to recognize their exposure. The NFL has long been more interested in protecting the brand than people.
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perfalbion wrote:
SpaceGhost wrote:
I think I saw that 200 players is 23% of of the league, so that makes about 870 players in the league. So the rate of being accused of assault is 44/870 = 5%


This is off. There are 32 teams, each with a 55 man roster. That's 1,760 players.

But I don't think this is actually about the statistics. For decades, the NFL's position was to sweep these things under the rug in the interest of keeping a valuable asset, er, player on the field so that tickets and advertisements got sold to reach the maximum number of people possible. It's not until we started seeing more and more video that they finally took any steps to even look into the matter, let alone address it.

We shouldn't expect football players to be saints. We should expect the NFL to recognize the importance of helping their players adjust to entering the league, dealing with the media spotlight, handling all the money, and setting higher expectations for them to recognize their exposure. The NFL has long been more interested in protecting the brand than people.


Of course, that attitude starts long before the NFL. You see that kind of protect the brand lax attitude in college football - e.g., Nick Saban and Taylor - https://www.cbssports.com/college-football/news/nick-saban-b...

And you see the lengths to which towns and high schools will go to cover up any number of things by players - see Steubenville.
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Christopher Yaure
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Colleges have long recognized that athletes, especially football players, represent a disproportionate number of violent acts on campus.
 
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Ben Foy
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Utrecht wrote:


All this is to say - is it really worth it for a backup quarterback? especially when you can get any number of retreds who are as skilled/pretty dam close, dont have baggage and fall in line with the preferred QM type.


There are numerous analysis on Kaepernick which suggest he is significantly better than 2-3 starters and most backups. But the damning thing is no team even brought him in for a workout. Plenty of teams have needs at QB and none of them looked at Kaepernick. That's a blacklist.

So there you have it. The NFL doesn't mind wife beaters. Will give a second chance to a player who interfered with a murder investigation. Or ran a dog fighting operation. Will forgive cheating or drug use. But kneel during the national anthem to support Black Lives Matter and you are gone (as soon as they can get out of your contract).
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