Recommend
13 
 Thumb up
 Hide
36 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Gaming with Kids

Subject: The homeschooling thread rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Bryan
United States
Hellertown
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Hello there
badge
Hello there
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Are there any other homeschoolers out there on BGG? I'm curious to see what games you may use to help enhance the learning process. Lately I've been trying to seek out games that go along with what my daughter is learning (currently 2nd grade).

Currently my daughter is learning about the U.S. and the states. The Scrambled States of America is helping a lot with learning the capitals and the locations of the states.

For zoology (her science curriculum for this year) we've been playing Evolution:Climate, although that's less purely educational, but does sort of teach a bit as far as survival mechanisms that animals have.

Once upon a time works pretty well for some creative writing type thinking as well.

We've also been having fun with Brain Quest SMART Game as it's basically just a general trivia game.

Outside of learning specific games, I think gaming in generally has greatly helped my daughter in all sorts of areas like math, reading, comprehension, problem solving, etc.

Those are the big ones that I'm using right now that I can think of.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Lacombe
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We homeschool. Ours are only 5 1/2 and 2 1/2 right now, but we plan to continue indefinitely.

My oldest enjoys Scrambled States, as well as all of the following:

Finca [this one has been the biggest surprise; played without the donkeys or bonus actions / bonus scoring tiles, he completely groks it and can play reasonably competently. Very good game for counting / planning / look-ahead]

Ticket to Ride: First Journey (U.S.) [this plays well, if a bit straight-forward, as a juniorized version of the big game; it's not necessarily a geography slam dunk,, though, really... except for learning the names / general location of some of the big US cities]

Tiki Topple [I actually think the game itself needs some help, but it's fun and quick and has good multi-turn goal-oriented play]

Kingdomino [not quite there yet with multiplication in the scoring, obviously, but your 2nd grader would likely be able to handle it]

Catan: Junior [this is a really good juniorized version of the big game, but the strategy is a little lost on him beyond just set collection]

Through the Desert [he's almoooost there on being able to play this one effectively; lots here to grow into, lots of depth for simple rules]
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan
United States
Hellertown
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Hello there
badge
Hello there
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
NateStraight wrote:

Ticket to Ride: First Journey (U.S.) [this plays well, if a bit straight-forward, as a juniorized version of the big game; it's not necessarily a geography slam dunk,, though, really... except for learning the names / general location of some of the big US cities]


I have the nordic countries version of ticket to ride that I got around christmas last year since the theme fit. Even I learned something trying to figure out how to pronounce those places haha. I do really need to get some different maps for this one.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls

Lacombe
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't actually have a good sense for how early Zendo would be something a kid could handle, but I think you should give it a look. It's a logical inference toolkit in a box.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Warrender
United States
Averill Park
New York
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
One neat thing we've found as homeschoolers is that you have the flexibility to customize your curriculum to your kids' interests, and so finding ways to build lessons around games they already like is just a natural thing.

Our family's favorite has always been Chinatown, so one time I put together a math lesson on estimating the future value of a deal.

Catan is of course a natural for learning about probability.

When we did a lesson about Egypt and specifically the construction of monuments, we played through Cleopatra and the Society of Architects.

Numbers League: Adventures in Addiplication was the only ostensibly 'educational' game we picked up but the gameplay was so fun that it was frequently requested outside of 'school hours'.

As I'm sure you'll learn, gaming (especially having the kids sit in with adult game groups) is just a great way for kids to develop their skills in manners, respect, patience, taking turns, etc -- all those socialization skills that non-homeschoolers are so concerned that we're failing to provide for our kids!

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
The Hoagland Family
United States
Mount Holly
New Jersey
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
When our kids were homeschooled, they loved everything in the 10 Days in... series. We also had a lovely set of math games called Knockout and Muggins which were very adaptable to different ages. Also Rummy Roots was a lot of fun. We used to use Rory's Story Cubes as writing prompts. I’m sure there were many more, but these are the ones I remember off the top of my head.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
d Michel
United States
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
+1 for the 10 Days In series, they are excellent for teaching geography.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
howl hollow howl
United States
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
We homeschooled our daughter since 1st grade; next year we'll send her to public school for 9th grade onwards.

We never incorporated gaming much into homeschool. We did use a lot of puzzle-type curriculum for logical thinking, so games like Ubongo were often used for homeschool breaks. In her early years, we used games like Lost Cities and Take it Easy! for practicing mental arithmetic... but that was a very minor (and fun!) supplement to more structured mental arithmetic drills.

Edit: We follow a fairly structured classical-style curriculum-centered approach to our homeschooling, and my answer reflects that. In my experience, you'll get a bigger difference in answers between unschoolers and classical homeschoolers than between us and school-taught families.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eddie Mun
United States
Mentor
Ohio
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We homeschool our 14 and 12 year old daughters and 8 year old son. Though there are lots of learning opportunities in games, I think that the soft skills that they learn will be the ones that serve them best. Though our kids are very social, homeschooling limits their normal exposure to lots of situations (both good and bad) that they need to learn how to work through. Gaming often helps create opportunities for social maturity. Like how to work as a team, how to be a good sport, how to encourage others, how to deal with loss, disappointment, or frustration, etc.

I have lot of games I could list, but no matter what games you play, look for opportunities to work on skills that they will need for the real world.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Nowak
United States
Greenville
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
You have paid retail for the last time.
badge
The human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children's games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up. - GKC
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Btw there is more than one homeschooling microbadge, and you can see all the users that “purchased” them to see just how many of us there are on bgg.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
lampeter
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I am also homeschooling my second grader. I also have a kindergartener and a couple more on deck.

Some classic games I have played with my eldest:

Scopa (addition)
Briscola
Oware
Gin Rummy
Cribbage (I will be teaching this soon- awesome for addition and skip counting)
Stratego
Risk
Battleship (working with a grid)

Games I have pulled out specifically for their educational value:

Outfoxed (logic/deduction-- she likes to play solo)
Edge of Extinction (A game about ecosystem building that uses real photos. The starter decks are real regions from the US, many of them national parks.)
Kingdomino (skip counting/multiplication)
Kingdoms (also for math- I haven't introduced it yet though)
Scrambled States
Timeline (We are doing ancient history this year, so I pulled out just those cards to play a mini- game)

I plan to pull out some other games just to add flavor. I find games to be great extensions of a topic to generate excitement about it.

Scarab Lords (Egypt-ish)
Municipium (Rome)
Santorini (Greece)
Birds of a Feather (birds)

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Ramsey

North Dakota
msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
Several good ones have already been mentioned. I'll give another vote for Kingdomino.

Also: we use Splendor to teach a little bit of thinking ahead/planing.

Potion Explosion is also good for that (but probably not quite as good)--the benefit is it looks like a total toy and is a really fun, tactile, game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jordan Hillis
United States
Glendale
Arizona
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
eddiemun wrote:
Gaming often helps create opportunities for social maturity. Like how to work as a team, how to be a good sport, how to encourage others, how to deal with loss, disappointment, or frustration, etc.


I agree with Eddie, I play games with my homeschooled kiddos more for the practical applications he listed rather than having the games tie into what they are learning at the time.

Right now we've been playing Brandon the Brave, a simple tile laying game but they get to think about where the best place to put each new tile is that will help them lay down their tiles before everyone else.

I'm pleasantly surprised to see this many homeschoolers on BGG
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Amy Martinez
United States
Saint Charles
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We used homeschooling for our three children. Games are great at teaching logical thinking . Really just playing games together gives your children many skills.

Zeus On The Loose
Maya madness
Can't stop
Blokus
Chess
Clue
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've never thought about using board games to supplement our homeschooling. I'm definitely keeping and eye on this thread. We are currently homeschooling a kinder gardener and 2nd grader. Both love playing games.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Rakstad
United States
Normal
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Homeschooling 4 of our 6 children. Though the oldest two are more independent now.

Don't know that we use games much in the teaching, but they certainly enjoy gaming. Our favorites right now are

Terraforming Mars
Great Dinosaur Rush
Agricola (family edition)

Also, Timeline is a cool game for history.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ryan Byrd
United States
Griffin
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Home schooling since they were born (now 13, 11, 8, 4). We have used Wildcraft! for herbs (my wife is an herbologist), Very Silly Sentences for the younger ones, and another one that eludes me right now. This third one is a large map of the world (on our wall). The kids travel around and go on an adventure where they spend time learning history, culture, economics, etc. It is played throughout the school year and can tie in most anything. There is a binder that goes with it, if I remember right. Unfortunately, my kids never really latched onto it, but it is really cool and versatile. I will ask my wife for the name. It is a really good home school tool, if used right. I think it starts with a "C".

We also have Global Pursuit, but it is pretty out dated.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
LSU LSU
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We home school ours (6, 4 and almost 2). I love games and have essentially plotted to encourage my kids to love games since they were born (I want future opponents whistle). I gave my eldest her first game (Go Away Monster) when she was 18 months and each of my kids get's a game from daddy on their birthday and at Christmas.

But the point of playing the games is to have fun as a family, learn how to win and lose graciously, and develop some skills. If they aren't enjoying it then it doesn't make sense. It's not an activity you can force with kids.

We've gradually added to our game list. A few examples of games my oldest two have enjoyed:

- Busy, Busy, Airport, which is a fun little game based on the Richard Scarry book.
- Busytown, which is a great find it game also based on Scarry's books.
- Lots of card games (Old Maid, War, etc.)
- Castle Panic - great cooperative for families
- Fire Island - great cooperative for kids. This is probably a little lighter than Castle Panic but I introduced them in reverse order not knowing any better about the complexity of the games and assuming my kids would like the castle/monster theme better.
- King of Tokyo - they both loves this and my 4 year old can beat her older sister sometimes which is a nice plus. We played without the cards at first and added them in later.
- Gobblet (an abstract that my 4 year old loves and will destroy you in)

My oldest also loves:
- Ticket to Ride (for my oldest). Now that she's reading her game opportunities have expanded a lot.
- Splendor - I no longer give myself a handicap. She can beat me straight up.
- Indigo (for my oldest). This is basically an abstract tile-path laying game. My oldest loves trying to redirect the stones away from me and I love that it makes her think several moves ahead.
- Small World (my oldest saw this on the shelf and asked to play it. I introduced it slowly (a few rounds, only a race power) and then expanded.
- X-Wing Miniatures. Same idea - we started with one ship each and no special abilities and then added things in slowly.
- Castles of the Mad King Ludwig. My oldest saw the box on the shelf and asked to try it. She hasn't won yet but she's getting very good at pricing buildings to maximize her benefit. It's probably something kids would normally need to be a little older to play, but she's played so many games that it made sense to her pretty quickly.

We're doing a unit-study program this year that started with Egypt so a few weeks in I introduced my oldest to:
- Archaeology - which she loves and has gotten quite good at. This is also nice to reinforce math. Lots of counting at the end. 15 + 30 + 4 + 45 type stuff.
- Imhotep - I thought this might be a bit too much but she's latched on to it well. She loves sending my full boat to a location she thinks I won't benefit from.

Puzzle games: Think fun has a great line of "games" that are really solo-puzzles. We have two:
- Rush Hour Jr. You have a grid with cars on it and can only move the cars forwards and backward. You have to do so to help the ice cream truck escape. There are forty puzzles in increasing difficulty.
- Lazer maze. Similar idea. 40 puzzles that require you to place mirrors and splitters to send a laser into between one and three rocket ships.

These are fabulous "quiet time" games and IMO great birthday presents.

So I'm not sure that you can always use a game to reinforce a home school concept, but I am pretty well convinced that games are great family activities that encourage students to learn.

Later on when we do American history I'll try to introduce her to some lighter Martin Wallace war games. She's enjoyed watching me set up solo GMT games but playing those with her is a long way off.

We haven't used the 10 Days Series yet (because I think it's out of print) but I played it recently at a game night and I'm quite sure that my kids would love it and that it would help with geography. So if you can get your hands on one of them I'd recommend it.

Edit: don't be afraid to simplify a rule set to help kids get into a game that you think they would find interesting. You can always add rules in later. We've also played more difficult games with functionally open hands at first. It's actually still how we play castle panic just because it's physically hard for my kids to hold all the cards in hand. Kids have no problem saying, "I've got it now daddy" when they don't need advice anymore.

Edited again to add notes on a couple of games.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
LSU LSU
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I noticed a few people say they used Rory's Story cubes for writing prompts. Would you mind saying a bit about how you do that?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan
United States
Hellertown
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Hello there
badge
Hello there
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
LSUtigers wrote:
I noticed a few people say they used Rory's Story cubes for writing prompts. Would you mind saying a bit about how you do that?


You have 9 dice that you roll, all with different images on them. Whatever story elements come up on the dice have to be included into a story. I don't have Rory's Story Cubes yet, but I do something similar with the cards from Once upon a time. I've thought about getting the story cubes, but they're similar enough that I don't think it's really neccessary. Part of me does still want them though. I also have Tell Tale (The disney princess version) which is a similar kind of thing. Maybe I'll spring for the story cubes this christmas (they're pretty cheap after all). They'll probably be better for my almost 4 year old as opposed to cards that she can beat up.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
LSU LSU
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Iridium192 wrote:
LSUtigers wrote:
I noticed a few people say they used Rory's Story cubes for writing prompts. Would you mind saying a bit about how you do that?


You have 9 dice that you roll, all with different images on them. Whatever story elements come up on the dice have to be included into a story. I don't have Rory's Story Cubes yet, but I do something similar with the cards from Once upon a time. I've thought about getting the story cubes, but they're similar enough that I don't think it's really neccessary. Part of me does still want them though. I also have Tell Tale (The disney princess version) which is a similar kind of thing. Maybe I'll spring for the story cubes this christmas (they're pretty cheap after all). They'll probably be better for my almost 4 year old as opposed to cards that she can beat up.


Thanks. That's really helpful. Sounds like something to look up as a stocking stuffer.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ryan Byrd
United States
Griffin
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I looked at the game with the world map. It is called Caravans. It is not in the BGG data base, and I am having trouble finding it on the internet, but I will keep looking.

Edit: I think this is it. This site has lots of other HS related "games".

http://www.teachinteract.com/c/product.web?nocache@0+s@PTtIc...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joel Veihmeyer
United States
Baltimore
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmb
Games that have performed better than the average game educationally:

As mentioned Story Cubes are a great tool both from a writing prompt standpoint and as an improv/drama/storytelling etc. tool.

Shut the Box is fantastic for young children learning to add/subtract single digits. I'm pretty sure each of my kids skipped several months of math practice by logging a few hours playing this with me. Even the oldest still enjoys it as a filler.

Ticket to Ride (and map expansions) for geography. As long as you don't mind teaching cities in their native languages for foreign countries, Ticket to Ride really helps you get a grasp of where different cities are as you have to check/choose destination cards. I personally have a better grasp of European geography (and spelling) now.

Set, 24, scrabble/bananagrams/upwords, quiddler, hangman, boggle, etc. can all be played as is or modified to work on a theme (e.g. setup boggle with a specific board to include "ch" twice if you're working on "ch" that week, grown ups should only use words they want the kids to learn, etc.).

As awful as it is as a game, Monopoly is still solid educationally. Add, subtract, multiply, divide, percentages, buying & selling, auctions/bidding, bankruptcy, interest, impacts of capitalism & monopolies on prices, how to flip a table, etc.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven Davies
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
badge
Koneko: A PvP worker placement game set in a very Feline Feudal Japan........
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
You could try messaging Tom Vasel directly. He homeschools all 742 of his children.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Infinger
msg tools
roarmalf wrote:
how to flip a table, etc.


That got a laugh, thank you.
We have a 10-year-old we have homeschooled since second grade. I have always been an avid board gamer, PnP RPG gamer, and PC nerd. My advice to any homeschooling parents would be to incorporate as many boardgames as you can find into their lives. I work full-time and my wife does the actual homeschooling but I choose games for the evening several times a week that we play. Each game from Battleship to "The Captain is Dead" all teach something and every session is a new chance for a "discussion" about the games theme and thus a chance to teach them something new. Board games create conversations which is something that is not always easy to generate with children. My son learned quite a bit about POWs in WW2 while he was arresting all my escapees over and over playing Colditz Escape the Castle... favorite moment... "Don't cut that fence daddy, I have shoot-to-kill and don't want to shoot you" I cut and ran banking on him rolling low to average... He shot me, then said it was in-the-leg. He also learns all about the Titanic (and cannibals) playing "Titanic sink the ship". We play dungeon press your luck games, Fluxx (Batman, Pirate, Zombie, Star, and of course Monty Python), Starwars Dice, etc, etc. One day we will be playing Risk and then on to Axis and Allies.
I understand some squeamish parents may reject some themes and that is your job with your parenting beliefs as well, luckily there are basically an endless supply of board games out and being created daily.

He will play his first PnP RP game this year, most likely in WEG Star Wars 1ed which I own all the books and modules in (or Warhammer Fantasy, likewise)... I will save Rolemaster for when I want him severing limbs...

On a nonboard game note "Stack the states" is a good app to learn states, capitals, and state-related trivia.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.