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Subject: The homeschooling thread rss

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Bryan
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Steve Broadfoot wrote:
You could try messaging Tom Vasel directly. He homeschools all 742 of his children.

I know Vasel has a billion kids, but I didn't realize that he homeschools. I knew I liked that guy.
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Bryan
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Grendal1971 wrote:
roarmalf wrote:
how to flip a table, etc.

That got a laugh, thank you.
We have a 10-year-old we have homeschooled since second grade. I have always been an avid board gamer, PnP RPG gamer, and PC nerd. My advice to any homeschooling parents would be to incorporate as many boardgames as you can find into their lives. I work full-time and my wife does the actual homeschooling but I choose games for the evening several times a week that we play. Each game from Battleship to "The Captain is Dead" all teach something and every session is a new chance for a "discussion" about the games theme and thus a chance to teach them something new. Board games create conversations which is something that is not always easy to generate with children. My son learned quite a bit about POWs in WW2 while he was arresting all my escapees over and over playing Colditz Escape the Castle... favorite moment... "Don't cut that fence daddy, I have shoot-to-kill and don't want to shoot you" I cut and ran banking on him rolling low to average... He shot me, then said it was in-the-leg. He also learns all about the Titanic (and cannibals) playing "Titanic sink the ship". We play dungeon press your luck games, Fluxx (Batman, Pirate, Zombie, Star, and of course Monty Python), Starwars Dice, etc, etc. One day we will be playing Risk and then on to Axis and Allies.
I understand some squeamish parents may reject some themes and that is your job with your parenting beliefs as well, luckily there are basically an endless supply of board games out and being created daily.

He will play his first PnP RP game this year, most likely in WEG Star Wars 1ed which I own all the books and modules in (or Warhammer Fantasy, likewise)... I will save Rolemaster for when I want him severing limbs...

On a nonboard game note "Stack the states" is a good app to learn states, capitals, and state-related trivia.

You may be interested in No Thank You, Evil!. It's the best kid themed RPG I've found. I started writing my own scenarios for the system. I especially like making dungeon doors that can only be opened by solving math puzzles.
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Stuart Holttum
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I'm wondering whether incorporating games into learning is necessarily a good idea? Is there not a danger that "games" will become another part of the schooling process, and thus begin to NOT be seen as a means of relaxation? Could "games as learning" lead eventually to those children NOT being gamers, because games become associated more with "learning" than "relaxation"?

I appreciate it can go both ways - but I'm thinking of the number of people in my acquaintance who haven't cracked a book for relaxation since they left schooling, because the reading experience was "tainted" for them.
 
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Bryan
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Stu Holttum wrote:
I'm wondering whether incorporating games into learning is necessarily a good idea? Is there not a danger that "games" will become another part of the schooling process, and thus begin to NOT be seen as a means of relaxation? Could "games as learning" lead eventually to those children NOT being gamers, because games become associated more with "learning" than "relaxation"?

I appreciate it can go both ways - but I'm thinking of the number of people in my acquaintance who haven't cracked a book for relaxation since they left schooling, because the reading experience was "tainted" for them.

The point of homeschooling for me is so that it doesn't go that way. Learning in itself is fun. This is something I didn't figure out until I was an adult. School made learning a chore because of the way that it was presented. I was a terrible student. As an adult I love learning about physics and math. It's a hobby for me. This is coming from someone that hated school, I didn't do my homework, I slept in class, I was an awful student. The key is to present the learning in a way that isn't dull, a way that isn't boring, and a way that is fun. We can open our eyes, look around, and say isn't it amazing. Look at all of the wonders around you, and be amazed by the beauty of it all. The school system that we have is designed to crush children's desire to learn. While all of her friends hate school, my daughter loves to learn and read. Also, the games aren't a core mechanic of the learning process. It's more like we're playing for fun and we can go "hey, remember how what you learned today kind of relates to this. Isn't that cool?" It's a subtle reinforcement. The stigma that learning isn't a part of relaxation is one that we need to crush as a society. Kids shouldn't be hating learning. There's so much that is fascinating and amazing all around us, and learning about it is fun, as long as you approach it in the right way. Homeschooling gives you the opportunity to give your child the learning experience they deserve, where they actually want to learn. Trying to push kids into a one size fits all box of drills, tests, social expectations, and monotony just doesn't work in my opinion.

/end rant haha.
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Stuart Holttum
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Iridium192 wrote:
Learning in itself is fun....

I'm not sure I disagree with much of that - learning can indeed be fun - but is ALL learning fun? Learning about things you find interesting can be, sure....doing anything you find interesting can be fun, and I am - generally - in agreement that an interesting lesson is better than a boring lesson.

I do sometimes wonder, though.....are the children whose every experience throughout childhood is a fun, positive one, going to be adequately prepared for the next 50 years of work? While many are lucky to be in jobs they love, for every one that makes it there are those who have to take the dull jobs.

Is there, possibly, a case that tailoring everything to a child's preferences; making every experience a wonderful and positive one; is going to lead to serious disappointment in their first job as mailroom-boy?

(or maybe I just had a bad day at work! )
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Bryan
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Stu Holttum wrote:
Iridium192 wrote:
Learning in itself is fun....

I'm not sure I disagree with much of that - learning can indeed be fun - but is ALL learning fun? Learning about things you find interesting can be, sure....doing anything you find interesting can be fun, and I am - generally - in agreement that an interesting lesson is better than a boring lesson.

I do sometimes wonder, though.....are the children whose every experience throughout childhood is a fun, positive one, going to be adequately prepared for the next 50 years of work? While many are lucky to be in jobs they love, for every one that makes it there are those who have to take the dull jobs.

Is there, possibly, a case that tailoring everything to a child's preferences; making every experience a wonderful and positive one; is going to lead to serious disappointment in their first job as mailroom-boy?

(or maybe I just had a bad day at work! )

You have to find the balance to not make your child a spoiled brat. There are still going to be things in their lives that they aren't going to want to do. They're still doing chores, they're still cleaning, they're still doing tasks they may not deem as fun, and there will likely still be topics that they have to learn that they are less interested in. I don't think that sitting children behind desks all day really prepares them any better for the work force. Children are children, not mini adults. The key is to teach them passion, and purpose. Why am I doing this awful job? Well it's actually not because the system is designed to bring me down, and I'm not just a victim to the man. In reality this job contributes a vital role to society. Without this job people would be missing this service. I'm contributing, and I'm gaining the resources to pursue my own interests and provide for my family. No matter how trivial, this matters. If you don't spend your life being crushed by a system that likes to crush your spirits, I think it's easier to reach these sorts of ways of thinking. You'll also be much more successful if you're much more intelligent.
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Ms. Shug
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I agree with Bryan. We've been homeschooling for a couple years now and I know a ton of homeschoolers. Presentation is key. Some kids love that "school at home" approach, but many kids do not. I imagine even if games were pushed as something they must do for educational purposes, that could suck the fun out of it. The cool thing with games is that usually, they aren't aware that they are learning. So, as a parent who went to public school, I have to fight my impulse to announce and just start doing stuff, or present things in a more casual, "hey, let's try this..." excited way. FYI--if you are interested, there's a fantastic facebook group about teaching with games. I'd say the majority of us are homeschoolers. It's called gameschool community. It's becoming hugely popular. As someone who has been gaming for years it's suddenly strange for me to have non-gamers know what I'm talking about. laugh
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Ms. Shug
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Also, would you all happen to know, is there a dedicated homeschool group on BGG? I'm not on here as much as I used to be and I haven't done a search. There are a number of us in the FB group who are continually pointing others to BGG. Would be nice if they had a friendly place to land. You know how daunting BGG can be for newcomers.
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Bryan
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quirogal wrote:
Also, would you all happen to know, is there a dedicated homeschool group on BGG? I'm not on here as much as I used to be and I haven't done a search. There are a number of us in the FB group who are continually pointing others to BGG. Would be nice if they had a friendly place to land. You know how daunting BGG can be for newcomers.

I actually just registered a guild on BGG with the intention of trying to make it a thing haha. I didn't see anything that existed for it yet. I haven't done anything with it yet. Here it is.
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Ms. Shug
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Iridium192 wrote:
quirogal wrote:
Also, would you all happen to know, is there a dedicated homeschool group on BGG? I'm not on here as much as I used to be and I haven't done a search. There are a number of us in the FB group who are continually pointing others to BGG. Would be nice if they had a friendly place to land. You know how daunting BGG can be for newcomers.

I actually just registered a guild on BGG with the intention of trying to make it a thing haha. I didn't see anything that existed for it yet. I haven't done anything with it yet. Here it is.


Cool! Just joined it. We are a party of 3 now! laugh

Thanks, Bryan.
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Peter Schott
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Just saw the guild announcement and figured I'd join in, though we do the "University Model" homeschooling - 2-3 days at a school, the rest at home. Full-time homeschooling would probably result in lots of head-butting around here. The days in-school are packed. The days at home are done at our pace, though usually done early to get them out of the way. Probably similar in concept to co-ops, but with the option for an accredited HS diploma.

As for the gaming part - we keep those separate, even if they do supplement the learning in some ways. Forcing a game as part of the curriculum would probably lead more to it not being fun. As it stands now, the oldest still likes to try out new games from time to time. The youngest just wants someone to play with.
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Mark Fredrickson
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lampeter wrote:

Municipium (Rome)

I felt compelled to necro-bump this virtually unknown Reiner Knizia game. Well done!

I find this game oddly compelling, despite the dead eye Romans on the cover. Probably the fact that your meeples can wear laurel wreaths.

Ave, Imperator, morituri te salutant.
 
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