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Subject: Private sharing - copyright laws rss

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Hey there,

I want to know more about private sharing regarding copyright laws.
For example, if someone ask for a copy of a manual (from a board game for example) that doesn't have it anymore and I share him privately (no public share) that copy from my owned game it is considered legal?

Thanks!
 
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Trevor Taylor
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Really, if you're worried about protecting yourself, you should be consulting a lawyer rather than a forum.

Saying that though, you have to consider what is enforceable and worth enforcing. You sharing a copy of a rule book of a friend who lost it is not...

-Losing the IP owner sales
-Making you a profit on their work
-Damaging their brand

So it's unlikely, even if you were somehow discovered, that they would complain.

More to the point though. It's rare that a company does not have a free digital download of rule books these days (Unless it's a core rule book for an RPG which is of course a different matter as you pay for this book).
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Thank you for your quick response.
I'm more interested in old board games that are out of print.
About sharing: I was thinking to share privately this info with someone (a friend, a user from this forum etc) that doesn't have it but he needs it to play the game.
 
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Trevor Taylor
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calebosboardys wrote:
Thank you for your quick response.
I'm more interested in old board games that are out of print.
About sharing: I was thinking to share privately this info with someone (a friend, a user from this forum etc) that doesn't have it but he needs it to play the game.


Well, OOP can be even simpler. If they aren't selling it anymore, it's unlikely to cost them in any way so even less likely to offend the IP holder.

Also possible, if something is old enough and you can prove the IP holder has long since stopped protecting their IP. You could possibly do what you like with it. This is similar to why companies seem to cruelly snuff out un-authorised free projects. It's because if they can be proven to have stopped protecting their IP, they could lose the right to do so when it is costing them money.
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brian hunt
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I dont think sharing with a friend should cause an issue and is within your copyright laws as you are the owner of said copy. Now if this friend prints hundreds of copies of this manual and sells them online that is another thing.
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By the way brian hunt,

If that person make copies of my copy and share them on the internet even if I explain him not to do so can I be held accountable for his actions?
My mission is to help others in needs but at the same time I want to stay in the legal area.

Thanks!
 
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Trevor Taylor
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paintballinrn wrote:
I dont think sharing with a friend should cause an issue and is within your copyright laws as you are the owner of said copy. Now if this friend prints hundreds of copies of this manual and sells them online that is another thing.


This is inaccurate sound advice (for most countries). The overall sentiment is likely correct. But in almost every instance, you do NOT have the legal right to copy a rule book and share it with others. It's just unlikely you'll get in trouble for doing it.
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Paul DeStefano
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negatrev wrote:
paintballinrn wrote:
I dont think sharing with a friend should cause an issue and is within your copyright laws as you are the owner of said copy. Now if this friend prints hundreds of copies of this manual and sells them online that is another thing.


This is inaccurate sound advice (for most countries). The overall sentiment is likely correct. But in almost every instance, you do NOT have the legal right to copy a rule book and share it with others. It's just unlikely you'll get in trouble for doing it.


It's really this. In most places.

No one will ever find out. But it's not quite legal. Doesn't matter if you don't make a dime.

Here's one theoretical why:

If 100 friends privately make copies for their friends an no one knows, when someone tries to resurrect the game as a kickstarter and 100 people don't need the new version because they have copies already, the kickstarter fails. A company is not reborn. While you made no money and stole nothing, someone's project falls apart and they don't make anything.

It's a silly hypothetical, but it is the essence of why you're not SUPPOSED to do it.
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Quote:
If 100 friends privately make copies for their friends an no one knows, when someone tries to resurrect the game as a kickstarter and 100 people don't need the new version because they have copies already, the kickstarter fails. A company is not reborn. While you made no money and stole nothing, someone's project falls apart and they don't make anything.


It's debatable here from my point of view:
- if someone already have the old one, he will not buy the new one for different motives: money because of the high price or already have it and he doesn't want the new experience or other motives.
- if he's a collector and supporter he will surely buy it.

About sharing stuff I was thinking about something small and to few people.

For example: I see very frequently requests about manuals or something missing and the others will help using P.M. as a method for sharing something privately.

So in your case is understanding (100 people it's something) but in this case I don't think sharing a manual to 1 people or few will damage in some way the production of a new version.

But it's understandable what you are saying about the legal area.

Thank you all for your responses!
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Jennifer Schlickbernd
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https://www.nap.edu/read/9601/chapter/6#129

Found on Google on the first page of the question.
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Bryan Thunkd
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calebosboardys wrote:
I share him privately
You'll likely never get caught, and even if you did they may or may not care... but technically you don't have the right to share copyrighted material for any reason. You're typically allowed to make a backup for personal use, but are restricted from sharing copies.
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Jason Larabell
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The important aspects of fair use to remember are: If you legally own a copy you legally can possess a backup (a duplicate made from an original). Source the backup is obtained from is not explicit in the law. Publicly shared depends on the type of work (as far as I know only television programming has been ruled on in this regard). If there is provable monetary loss to the copyright holder it definitely would be violating the law. Copyright holder can give you permission to do stuff with their work. So any time you aren't certain if you can do something contact said holder and ask permission to do said something.
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NoFunAtAll
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... Don't start stirring the pot and start looking for trouble please... We don't want any of those copyright debacles we've had in videogaming to come over to this hobby as well now do we?
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Do you know what's sad?

Board games that are out of print (more years old) and you can't share something to help others.

For example, someone bought a board game for cheap and the manual (or something else) is missing and you have it completed but because of the copyright laws you can't help him.

If a board game is rare and old the chances to find what you need are small...

But laws are laws and that's why they are created to protect the IP holder and to respect them.

Anyway, thank you everyone for your comments

Best regards,
Calebos
 
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Anon Y. Mous
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calebosboardys wrote:
But laws are laws and that's why they are created to protect the IP holder and to respect them.


Copyright laws are pretty broken and horribly twisted from their original purpose. If a game is out of print, the copyright isn't helping promote the progress of science or useful arts, it's effectively destroying a culturally relevant work. Copyrights outlasting the availability of a work are the modern equivalent of the burning of the Library of Alexandria.
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Trent Boardgamer
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calebosboardys wrote:
Hey there,

I want to know more about private sharing regarding copyright laws.
For example, if someone ask for a copy of a manual (from a board game for example) that doesn't have it anymore and I share him privately (no public share) that copy from my owned game it is considered legal?

Thanks!


It breaches copyright on face value. If you want a good guideline on this, pretty much all the universities/colleges post guidelines for when and how you can replicate copyrighted books and to what degree without breaching copyright.

As Trevor suggested though, short of posting you are doing this on the internet and it blowing up into some issue, I can't imagine the copyright holder is going to track you down to take legal action.

Here is a link http://www.student.uwa.edu.au/learning/resources/ace/respect... to one of the major universities guidelines. They enforce the international standard for copyright. In regards to software, be aware that the US has stricter rules than the international standards.
 
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