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Subject: Broke my book rss

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Dan Probert
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So I had previously heard that to safely break in a new hard cover book you are supposed to run the back of a butter knife through the page creases. I've been using my book for a few days and noted that some pages laid flat easier than others and tried this method. I accidentally tore a couple of pages out of the intro. And before you ask, I was indeed using the back of a rounded knife.

Afterwards I looked online and found this: https://lifehacker.com/break-in-a-hardcover-book-without-rui... Basically what I did only sans knife.

I'm thinking of taking it to a book binder and seeing what they can do, any other ideas?

Fortunately I ordered a spare book with the Kickstarter but I would still like to repair this one.
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that Matt
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Book binder is a good way to go. (I'm not sure what benefit the knife was claimed to provide, but it sounds like serious overkill.)
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Klutz
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Might be cheaper to just order a new book from the KD:M store when they become available (assuming they do).

And if you do that, you could carefully cut out the most used pages from your broken book and have them laminated. Then you can reference the showdown pages for each monster, the injury charts, etc. without putting wear and tear on your new rule book!

That's something I want to try and do, I'm just not sure how I'll go about "scanning" said pages properly without cutting them out.
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John Middleton
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I've never heard of using a butter knife.

All hardcover books I buy that have sewn signatures, get broken in properly.


You stand it up right on the spine, let the two covers down to either side and move inwards, laying a page or two down from each end, and running your hand along the seam. Keep going till you have done the whole book.


This is especially important on thick hardcovers, like bound graphic novels or reference books.


For that matter, I also put plastic library covers from Demco on my dust jackets.



As far as repairs, get some good book tape, from Demco maybe, and repair it that way. A page torn from a signature in gonna be tough to fix any other way.
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Orion Free
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Sounds like you rolled a 2 on the book-flattening event
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Dan Probert
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orionstein wrote:
Sounds like you rolled a 2 on the book-flattening event

I rolled a 3. On a 2 it bursts into flame and on a 1 I die to blood loss from paper cuts.
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James J

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I've been an avid reader my whole and this is the first I've ever heard about breaking in a book. As much use as I hope this manual will get, I'll have to try this.
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John Middleton
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japester1 wrote:
I've been an avid reader my whole and this is the first I've ever heard about breaking in a book. As much use as I hope this manual will get, I'll have to try this.


Go into a rare book store or a bookbinders and just casually throw something open to about page 200 and watch what they do.


 
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James J

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DegenerateElite wrote:
japester1 wrote:
I've been an avid reader my whole and this is the first I've ever heard about breaking in a book. As much use as I hope this manual will get, I'll have to try this.


Go into a rare book store or a bookbinders and just casually throw something open to about page 200 and watch what they do.




Can't say I've ever seen a bookbinder location, much less been in one. But I've been in many book stores, including ones that sell rare/older books (I spent my early years in NYC). Never heard this mentioned. Was never cautioned as I browsed books. Never heard a single book collecting friend mention this.

I'll certainly keep it in mind for the future, but I find it odd that I've never been exposed to this info before. That's all. Maybe I'm just naturally careful with books. I doubt anyone who has an interest in rare books would ever "casually throw open" any of them.
 
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Dan Probert
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So I opened my second book and broke it in by hand this time. I did two passes using the above method. First time I held the middle pages up in the air second time I laid them flat. I tried a couple different ways and what seemed to work best was running the flat of my thumbnail over the page creases.

Everything seemed to have worked out perfectly with a couple le of minor exceptions. The first and last page are glued slightly differently so I had some issues getting them creased. They each have about a centimeter glued to the next pages. I also got some ink on my thumbs but there was no smearing on the pages.

All in all, took a while but it looks like everything went fine. I'll report back if I encounter any other issues.
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KevBelisle wrote:
I'm just not sure how I'll go about "scanning" said pages properly without cutting them out.


There's basically no way to "properly" scan a book on a simple flatbed without destroying it. To get clean scans, you have to basically break the spine, to the point that you might as well unbind the book and separate it. At that point, you might as well scan the whole thing.

Of course, if you have Google's archival book scanners, then you can get a much nicer scan, but that's the difference between being a regular person and being Google.
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John Middleton
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Chaorain wrote:
So I opened my second book and broke it in by hand this time. I did two passes using the above method. First time I held the middle pages up in the air second time I laid them flat. I tried a couple different ways and what seemed to work best was running the flat of my thumbnail over the page creases.

Everything seemed to have worked out perfectly with a couple le of minor exceptions. The first and last page are glued slightly differently so I had some issues getting them creased. They each have about a centimeter glued to the next pages. I also got some ink on my thumbs but there was no smearing on the pages.

All in all, took a while but it looks like everything went fine. I'll report back if I encounter any other issues.



When you do this breaking in, you only need slight pressure from your hand along the seams. You are not trying to crease anything or force it to lay flat.

The goal is to separate the pages in an orderly fashion so that the cloth binder, the headband, inside the spine curves properly when the book is opened. This will prevent signatures from loosening with use and prevent the outer spine itself from getting creases, like old paperbacks do. You are breaking in the flexible back so that it curves nicely and doesn't just break at an angle.

You hardly need any pressure at all to do this.

Granted with a thin book like the KDM rules, the benefits can be negligible, but it does not hurt to do it. The biggest issue with KDM is the longitudinal pages that stress the signatures.

 
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John Middleton
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GrauGeist wrote:
KevBelisle wrote:
I'm just not sure how I'll go about "scanning" said pages properly without cutting them out.


There's basically no way to "properly" scan a book on a simple flatbed without destroying it. To get clean scans, you have to basically break the spine, to the point that you might as well unbind the book and separate it. At that point, you might as well scan the whole thing.

Of course, if you have Google's archival book scanners, then you can get a much nicer scan, but that's the difference between being a regular person and being Google.


A proper library will have book scanners that prevent this. I've even seen triangular shaped ones at archives before.

Talk to them about using one, especially a University library.
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