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Subject: A game to reduce gerrymandering rss

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Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
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Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
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Interesting idea here (click thru to read; it's short).

 
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Andre
United States
Connecticut
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Interesting concept, but possibly more difficult in execution. How often is it done? And how does one not create mass confusion, when you might be part of District A one voting cycle, and B on another?



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Agent J
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Coldwater
Michigan
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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I always forget what ward I'm in until I get to election day and I rush around trying to figure out where the boundaries are. It would be great to have it be different every time, so long as there was an easy resource that would let me look it up.
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Alaren
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I'm not sure how "let's make gerrymandering even more complicated" satisfies the descriptor "reduce[s] gerrymandering."

The mathematical goals of gerrymandering are cracking (ensuring comfortable but not large majorities in one's own districts) and packing (ensuring supermajorities for your opponent in their districts, as close to 100% as you can get).

The first move to make in this game would be to give your opponent a choice between freezing one of a few districts where they have a supermajority, and freezing one of several districts where they have a large minority. If they take the supermajority district, they lose (at least some of) the ability to make the same move against you in the next turn, so their best move is to freeze a district as close to 50/50 as possible, to maximize their packing/cracking abilities on their own turn.

Quote:
In the end, neither player has an inordinate chance to pack districts with an unequal voting balance.


Except that whoever goes last gets to decide the makeup of two districts rather than one, and since the optimal play style leading up to that final move seems to favor 50/50, whoever goes last likely gets to control two districts instead of one, albeit perhaps at very slim majorities (provided previous play has hewn as closely as possible to 50/50 splits).

Since everyone can do this fairly basic math, then, the strategies that present themselves take on a "press your luck" mechanic where you try to get your opponent to freeze a semi-packed district. They would be foolish to freeze a 90%+ district if you offered one, but what about 80%? Or 70%? Below about 70% but above 55% it starts to look like an easy choice to accept, but if you take such an easy choice more than once it could cost you big in the end (again, depending on play order and who goes first and how many turns there are).

So the "problem" of gerrymandering remains, only now it's been further obfuscated both by the increased complexity and by the illusion of negotiation and cooperation in the process--because of course the two "players" will be the two major parties in a bifurcated system that functions to suppress third- and fourth- options.

Hard pass.
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