Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
10 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Chit Chat

Subject: Need some on-line movie-watching advice [Hivemind] rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
If I was truly the product of “Intelligent Design,” I’m pretty sure my fingers would be smaller or my nose would be bigger.
United States
Kansas City
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
I think that all right-thinking people in this country are sick and tired of being told that ordinary, decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am.
Avatar
mbmb
Our family has a Friday night ritual we’ve followed for nearly ten years: homemade pizza followed by a movie. We rotate whose pick it is each week. Occasionally my kids will find a movie that they want to watch, but it’s not available on Vudu (our pay-per-movie supplier of choice). Tonight my daughter wants to watch Six-String Samurai, which is not on Vudu, but which is on ‘bmovies’, a free on-line service. We do not have Roku or any other way to store a downloaded movie.

We have a wireless DVD player (Sony BDP-S3700 (which I do not recommend, BTW)) connected to a refurbished Westinghouse DWM48F1G1. I am wondering if it’s possible to either connect the TV directly to the Internet via our home wireless network, or get the DVD player to connect to the Internet so we can watch movies from someplace other than the “approved” list of services on the player. Would Chromecast or something similar allow this?

The player has a front USB port and the option to use the TV as a second screen, so would a direct USB wire from my laptop to the player work as well?

I am open to suggestions, especially ones that cost very little. I guess I’m asking what would be the least expensive method to connect the DVD player directly to the Internet so we can search for on-line movie sources?

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Jones
United States
Wilsonville
Oregon
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Not as "tech" as I used to be, so here is my guess...

This is your TV manual:
http://westinghouseelectronics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/1...
This is your player manual:
https://docs.sony.com/release//Manual_4579663131.pdf

The short answer here is that I don't think you can directly connect the player to the internet. Per the manual, your player only knows how to retrieve data via DLNA. I'm not really sure how you are getting Vudu to work unless there is software for that built in to the TV or the player.

What I think you would have to do is turn another PC in your house into a DLNA server and have the DVD player feed off of that. The descriptions of DLNA make it sound as though it is meant to stream stored media and not streaming media, but if you type "DLNA server" into Google, there is some software that will do this for you. I don't know how easy it really is to make this work.

That said, you do have three HDMI ports and a VGA port on the back of your television. It is rare for laptops to not be able to connect to one of these two connectors provided you have the right cable. Its probably easier to connect a laptop (if you have one) directly into your TV than to try to setup a relay between your player and another computer. Added bonus here is that if you want to pay for a wireless mouse & keyboard, you can play computer games on your giant tele, which I have done and is fun.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
If I was truly the product of “Intelligent Design,” I’m pretty sure my fingers would be smaller or my nose would be bigger.
United States
Kansas City
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
I think that all right-thinking people in this country are sick and tired of being told that ordinary, decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am.
Avatar
mbmb
davypi wrote:
Not as "tech" as I used to be, so here is my guess...

This is your TV manual:
http://westinghouseelectronics.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/1...
This is your player manual:
https://docs.sony.com/release//Manual_4579663131.pdf

[snip]

I'm not really sure how you are getting Vudu to work unless there is software for that built in to the TV or the player.


It has built-in software for Netflix, Vudu, Hulu, YouTube, Playstation, Crackle, Pandora, Slacker radio, and a bunch of other applications. In fact, it refers to all of them as "apps" in the on-screen dialogs.


Quote:
What I think you would have to do is turn another PC in your house into a DLNA server and have the DVD player feed off of that. The descriptions of DLNA make it sound as though it is meant to stream stored media and not streaming media, but if you type "DLNA server" into Google, there is some software that will do this for you. I don't know how easy it really is to make this work.


I saw that section in the manual and believe you are correct. I will check with Google to see what's available/workable.

Quote:
That said, you do have three HDMI ports and a VGA port on the back of your television. It is rare for laptops to not be able to connect to one of these two connectors provided you have the right cable. Its probably easier to connect a laptop (if you have one) directly into your TV than to try to setup a relay between your player and another computer.


Looking at pp. 21-22 of the manual, it indicates that I can use the player to "mirror" the screen of a mobile device. My wife and kids have enabled their phones to control YouTube videos via the player, so I was wondering if I can connect my laptop via either the home network or by an HDMI cable to do the same. Then I can use my laptop to stream a movie and have the big TV mirror my screen.

But maybe going directly to the TV would be the better route. I know the sound system is connected to the TV out plugs, so my stereo plays whatever the TV is showing. I think we have a spare HDMI cable, so I will check the TV source inputs and experiment with that.

EDIT: In fact, using the cable might be the better option, because otherwise the wireless network will be sending the movie to my laptop at the same time as it's trying to send the data from my laptop to the player. Using a cable directly to the TV will cut down on interference, and hopefully prevent buffering problems, which is always really annoying while watching a movie.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mystery McMysteryface
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Low cost option: Inter-library loan of DVDs.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
If I was truly the product of “Intelligent Design,” I’m pretty sure my fingers would be smaller or my nose would be bigger.
United States
Kansas City
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
I think that all right-thinking people in this country are sick and tired of being told that ordinary, decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am.
Avatar
mbmb
EgorjLileli wrote:
Low cost option: Inter-library loan of DVDs.


We've done that in the past, but found that Vudu movies, at anywhere from $3 to $5 each, give us a pretty good variety, and we can watch them right then without having to wait for the DVD to get to our nearest library branch. Our kids are now old enough that they no longer qualify for the kid rate at theaters, so all four of us can watch a Vudu movie for less than the cost of one adult ticket.

Now we're branching out and trying to watch free movies that stream on-line. I just bought an HDMI cable to directly connect my laptop to the TV, so we'll see how that works.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
♬♪♪ ♫ ♩ ♫♫♪ ♩♬♪ ♫
Australia
MURRUMBEENA
Victoria
flag msg tools
badge
All reality is a game. Physics at its most fundamental, the very fabric of our universe, results directly from the interaction of certain fairly simple rules, and chance... (Iain Banks)
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I tried Chromecast and it was buggy - 50% of shows suffered lag or connection problems. I'm pretty sure the issue was lack of buffer storage and an ADSL connection with constantly varying speeds ("dynamic", they call it: "f@cked", I call it).

So, $60 for a good quality HDMI cable. Laptop to TV, select input #3 on the TV remote and it is awesome.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Challie Coppel
United States
Huntsville
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
we usually chromecast from the laptop but will if we are having too many issues hook the computer directly to the television.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
If I was truly the product of “Intelligent Design,” I’m pretty sure my fingers would be smaller or my nose would be bigger.
United States
Kansas City
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
I think that all right-thinking people in this country are sick and tired of being told that ordinary, decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I’m certainly not, and I’m sick and tired of being told that I am.
Avatar
mbmb
We ended up taking the easy way out: "Six-string Samurai" was available complete on YouTube, so we watched it there.

I got the HDMI cable set up correctly, but the 'bmovie.com' website was awful laggy, mostly due to it trying to download ads. (Thankfully my machine is pretty well packed with anti-malware programs.) If I'd had enough room on my laptop I would have downloaded it, but I wasn't sure how much space it needed. I suspect all the on-line "free" movie sites are the same way.

So, I will need to do some experimentation to find a good movie site for the things we want to watch that aren't available on Vudu or other online movie channels.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Jones
United States
Round Rock
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
An Amazon Fire Stick is $40 normally and you can get it for $25 buck when it's on sale (like right now). Plug it in and you can use Vudu, Netflix, Hulu, a bunch of other streaming apps and Amazon on demand movies. Amazon Prime too if you have it.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Xander Fulton
United States
Astoria
Oregon
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
claymore_57 wrote:
We ended up taking the easy way out: "Six-string Samurai" was available complete on YouTube, so we watched it there.

I got the HDMI cable set up correctly, but the 'bmovie.com' website was awful laggy, mostly due to it trying to download ads. (Thankfully my machine is pretty well packed with anti-malware programs.) If I'd had enough room on my laptop I would have downloaded it, but I wasn't sure how much space it needed. I suspect all the on-line "free" movie sites are the same way.

So, I will need to do some experimentation to find a good movie site for the things we want to watch that aren't available on Vudu or other online movie channels.


Yeah, we've been pretty disappointed in any "free" movie streaming site. They all suck. Youtube is the 'least bad' option, but it's library of 'classic' content is...uhhh...not present. Even PBS throws up the occasional ad to some external site that seems to cause the whole player to seize up. It's a very special kind of ridiculous!

So we basically do Amazon Prime (useful for basically everything here in BFE, the video library is just a bonus, but it does include a TON of classic movies...we're diving into the 'Colonel March of Scotland Yard' series with Boris Karloff) + Hulu (basically for network TV - 'Agents of SHIELD', 'Modern Family', etc) + Netflix (everything else - movies, mostly). Then all that from a simple media center PC plugged into the TV via HDMI.

And, of course, one of the upsides of living on the edge of civilization. We actually still have a video rental store! They do a great job getting anything that comes out on Blu-Ray day-of-release, so that's...just awesome, really. When back in the city, this was the only item we really did different, in that we used RedBox, but...for real, an actual video store with helpful/informative staff is just SO much better!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.