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Subject: Analysis paralysis from not shuffling? rss

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Curtis Himel
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Strongly considering picking Aeon's End up, but have a concern about the non-shuffling aspect. Does that lead to prolonged analysis paralysis where you're trying to plan several moves ahead and thinking about how you're stacking your deck? If not, what keeps that from happening?

Thanks!
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The Way
Vietnam
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Personally I don't put much thought beyond the obvious pairings. It is something you can put effort into, but ultimately it isn't as big a deal as it seems it could be. It affords you a sense of how the future turns will go more than actually controlling them. I prefer large decks, so card order isn't as key.

Then again I'm not that good, so take what I say with a grain of salt.
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In most cases, the two are the same - planning your future turns involves setting up your discard as best as you can. There's always the possibility of analysis paralysis, but I've primarily avoided overthinking the discard setup with a few different methods, mostly tactical decisions and one via house-rule.

1. For beginners, it's generally enough to understand that whatever you place at the bottom of your deck is what will appear first. You won't always want to put your strongest cards there, but it's good enough to get you through the early steps of the game.

2. If you are starting to do more fancy setups, most of the time it's sufficient to just count cards by multiples of 5. That indicates when a hand will start and end. You can usually set up your incoming cards enough by doing so. It's not perfect, since if you don't draw a hard of 5, if you end up drawing additional cards, or so on, this might interfere with the pattern - however, this ends up being 'good enough' for most circumstances.

3. My group plays with the house rule that as long as it's known information, you're allowed to look through your deck if you're doing so for a clear purpose. Everybody's deck is perfect information, and we use it to keep people from bogging down the game by needing to commit their discards to memory.

It's a real concern, but my group's never had too many issues with it - and we have some people who take 5-minute turns with more complex games.
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Chris Edwards
United States
Lansdowne
Pennsylvania
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To add a little bit to what the previous responders said...

Most of the time, the largest decision you're able to make about the order of your deck is actually a fairly simple decision at the end of your turn, something like this:
Would I rather draw this relic sooner (to use its effect) or this gem (to have more spending power)? It's usually not a difficult decision to make, and it's not going to happen every turn. It's not even a big factor every game.

There aren't many effects in the game that let you draw extra cards, so you'll rarely have very many cards (or a large variety of cards) going into your discard pile at one time.

I was slightly worried about the same thing, being AP-prone myself, and I haven't found it to be problematic at all. Definitely don't let your concern deter you from buying the game! It's awesome!
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Crazed Survivor
France
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You're really overthinking it if you're trying to memorize the exact order of all the cards in your deck, and you don't need to. Just know that you need this and that together and you're good. In case you have the opportunity to draw then discard the answer is almost always yes anyway unless it would make your discard pile disappear and you need it for some reason.
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Ben Kyo
Japan
Osaka
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Of course, if you want to optimise, you have to take into account the situations and draw numbers that can result in your carefully paired cards being split between draws. This did bug me when I played, but in the end I decided that the degree of planning and card tracking involved simply wasn't worth it. We lost, but almost certainly because of more fundamental errors and/or bad luck in the nemesis and turn order draws.

I'm not inclined to play again, but if I were, this aspect of the game would bug me. Perfect information is not always a good thing.
 
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Hedyn Brand
Norway
Oslo
Lethargy
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I try to cluster cards which go well together for the situation, but I don't pay much attention beyond that. If I'm preparing for a salvo of damage on the nemesis I try to order them that way, and some of the time I just try to interleave cards of different types. Not spending many seconds on thinking it through though
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Julian Wasson
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Washington
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I was worried about this, too. It's one of the reasons I put off picking it up for so long. I thought it would be fiddly and introduce too much to track.

But after playing several games, I've realized that my fears were completely unfounded. This game doesn't particularly lend itself to AP. I've got several AP-prone friends, and one of my partners experiences stress when exposed to many of the factors that contribute to AP, and they've all played it with zero difficulty.

Some of that is the limited control you have over it. Spells are cast at the start of your turn and go immediately into your discard and when you purchase cards they go immediately into your discard. So really you're just ordering the Gems and Relics you played this turn, and it's often a very straightforward choice.

The other half is that you never discard cards you didn't play so if your draw comes up wonky and a critical combo gets split across draws, you can always just sit on it for a turn and they'll sync right back up. I'll intentionally do this on early shuffles to force the earliest possible sync for important combos (Diamond Clusters are a good example).
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Anon Y. Mous
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Most of the deck ordering stuff becomes second nature eventually. Decks also generally stay smallish, since resources are pretty tight you really can't afford to be buying a bunch of unnecessary cards, so it's not too overwhelming to keep track of. What really matters for deck order is timing your buys. If you buy a combo piece, you want to buy it on the same turn that you play the other piece of the combo to be able to get them together. This might mean you should buy the first piece with higher-value gems so you can draw those together, and so on. You can do a lot of planning with it, but it's not about memorizing the deck.
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Dizdi
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Not at all!
Aeon's End is one of the most Action Movie deckbuilding games I have played.
Furious and fast turns with small upkeep during the Nemesis phase.
I have played it only with 2 players 7 times now.
It is relaxing and keeps a good pacing. There is no AP like in Big Book of Madness(which I also love).
Go and buy the 2nd edition! Recommended!
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