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Subject: My attempt to reword and rearrange the rules rss

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Ola S.
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Judging by the number of rules questions, it seems that the official rules, as written, may be hard to follow. Because I thought it would be an interesting challenge, I tried to reword and rearrange the rules, putting references to the full game throughout instead of shunting them to the last page.

Note that these rules aren't official, and that they might differ in details from the game as devised by Ben Stanley.

If you see things that could be fixed or clarified, tell me.




FULL VS. SIMPLIFIED RULES

There are two versions of the game: the full version, and a simplified version. A player who thinks the full game is too daunting may try the simplified version to get a taste of the game.

The main difference between the games is this: In the simplified game, each square may only contain one piece, like in Chess. In the full game, a square may contain any number of stacked pieces, as long as all those pieces are on the same side.

SET-UP

Place the game board such that each player has a green land area next to them, with the blue water area in between.

Each player takes one yellow "king" piece and 15 other pieces. In the standard setup, the pieces are divided evenly: each player gets three of each kind. (Other setups are possible, see Recommended Variants.)

One player turns the pieces so they have the little spots facing up, the other player turns them with the spots facing down.

Each player's 16 pieces are placed in front of them, at the upper and lower edges of the board. (Later in the game, pieces will be removed from the board; removed pieces are put to the left or right of the board, and are not available to either player.)

The next step is to decide who goes first. This can be done, for instance, by flipping one of the king pieces like a coin; the other player calls "spot" or "blank". Or by playing a game of Alchemy (rules available on BoardGameGeek).

The game is now ready to begin. On their first turn, each player places their king on one of the two rows closest to themselves. They then continue to alternate turns until the game ends.

OBJECTIVE

The goal of the game is to remove the opponent's king from the board.

YELLOW (king)

The king cannot move, except as part of a stack. When a player's king is removed from the game for any reason, that player has lost.

The king's special ability is to bring other pieces into play. When this ability is used, the piece is placed on any of the eight squares surrounding the king, or on the king itself. Bombs may also be placed on or next to friendly elementals.

In the simplified game, elementals may also be deployed next to friendly elementals.

Pieces may not be deployed on top of the opponent's pieces.

In the simplified game, the king's summoning ability is always limited to one piece per turn. In the full game, the king is limited to one piece per turn at first. If a player controls three regions, that player's king may summon up to two pieces per turn. With six regions controlled, the limit is raised to three. ("Controlling" a region means being the only player who has pieces in that region.)

ELEMENTAL UNITS

The elemental units are the workhorses of the game. On a turn, an elemental may move up to a certain number of squares in any of the eight orthogonal and diagonal directions. The intervening squares may contain friendly pieces, but not hostile ones.

An elemental may land on a hostile piece or stack, and then remove it from the game; this is called "capturing".

The four types of elementals have their own characteristics:

GREEN (land unit)

The green pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn. Unlike blues and whites, greens can change directions in the middle of a turn, and may return to their starting square (effectively passing a turn).

They must always remain on land, except when stacked with other types of pieces. When used as the transport in a stack, the starting square may be on water, but the intervening and stopping squares must be on land. There is an exception (full game only): water squares containing friendly pieces may be traversed as easily as land.

They can conduct land-to-water assaults: if an enemy on a water square next to land could've been reached if the square was land, the blue piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

BLUE (water unit)

The green pieces may move up to three spaces in a turn, in a straight line.

They must always remain on water, except when stacked with other types of pieces. When used as the transport in a stack, the starting square may be on land, but the intervening and destination squares must be on water. There is an exception (full game only): land squares containing friendly pieces may be traversed as easily as water.

They can conduct water-to-land assaults: if an enemy on a land square next to water could've been reached if the square was water, the blue piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

WHITE (air unit)

The white pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn, in a straight line.

These are all-rounder units: they're not as fast as blues, nor do they maneuver as easily as the greens, but they can traverse any kind of territory.

RED (fire unit)

The red pieces may only move one space in a turn. They can traverse any kind of territory.

Whenever a player moves their red piece, after the move, any hostile pieces next to it are repelled from the red piece, one square in a straight line.

If the repel causes any piece to be pushed off the board, or pushed into a space it cannot occupy (unsupported green into water, unsupported blue into land, or any piece into a piece it cannot stack with), or pushed despite being immobile (kings/bombs not stacked with an elemental), that piece is removed from the game. (Any bombs thus removed are detonated on the beginning square.)

BLACK (bomb)

The black pieces are bombs. They cannot be moved after being placed, except as part of a stack.

When a bomb is activated by a player, it is removed from the game.

Whenever a bomb is removed from the game for any reason, it explodes! All pieces on that square and on the eight surrounding squares are also removed from the game.

STACKS

In the full game, there may be more than one friendly piece on the same square. This is called a "stack". A stack or part of a stack can move as one piece, and has all the powers of its component pieces, with some restrictions. (There's no upper limit to how big stacks can be, but in practice, stacks that are bigger than five pieces are too much trouble to be worth it.)

When a player decides to use a stack, there are up to three phases of the turn:

1. Activate powers

If the yellow piece (king) is on the beginning square, it may summon one (or two or three, if enough regions are controlled) pieces. This may be done before moving, or instead of a move.

If a black piece (bomb) is on the beginning square, it may be detonated, destroying the stack and everything on the eight adjacent squares.

2. Move, optionally capture

One of the elemental pieces in the stack (or part of stack) to be moved is chosen as a "transport". The stack moves as a whole while complying with the transport's restrictions.

The stack may land on an opposing piece to capture it, or use the transport's special capture ability, if it has one.

A stack may move through friendly pieces, but may not pick up or drop off any pieces in intervening squares.

If a red piece is moved, even if it's not the transport, its repel ability is activated immediately after the move.

3. Activate powers after move

If a yellow or black piece is on the destination square, its powers may be used as before the move; however, the king may not summon pieces both before and after the move.

END OF GAME

A player wins if the other player has their king removed from the game, or if the other player resigns. The game is drawn if both players agree, if both kings are destroyed at the same time, if it's impossible for either player to win, or if the same position (including the same piece reserves) repeats three times.

OFFICIAL VARIANTS

Different armies: Instead of playing with three of each unit type, a player may use any combination of units to compose their 15-piece force. For extra flexibility when composing forces, consider purchasing an extra set of pieces from Nestorgames.

Battle Bay: This is an alternate game board available from Nestorgames as part of the Symbol² expansion. It is seven by seven squares, like the default board, but the three regions on the left side are all land, on the right side all water. This opens up for quite different tactics.

Hexagonal Warfare: This is an alternate game board available from Nestorgames as part of the Symbol² expansion. Unlike the other two boards, it is composed of hexagons. Pieces move in any of the six directions. This board is very cramped (37 hexes, instead of 49 squares).

OTHER VARIANTS

Unlimited reinforcements: Each player only gets eight pieces, in addition to the king. When a piece is removed from the game, it is returned to its owner, who may put it back into play on another turn.

Turncoats: When a piece is removed from the game, it is flipped over and put into the inventory of the opposing player, who may put it back into play on his side - a bit like Shogi.

Region control tiebreaker: When a draw occurs, rather than simply letting the game remain unsettled, the winner is the one who controls the most regions.
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Daniel Piovezan
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A praiseworthy effort! I was thinking of doing that myself, but I wouldn't have the time right now, and I'm still waiting for a few answers.

But I didn't even bother reading the whole thing, simply because I don't agree with the premise of describing the two rulesets together. What I would do instead, is to make them two complete independent things. Maybe worrying only about the full rules first - making a simplified ruleset from that should be easy, then.
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Ola S.
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OK. I'll split them up and see if that works better:




SIMPLIFIED RULES FOR SYMBOL

SET-UP

Place the game board such that each player has a green land area next to them, with the blue water area in between. The board is divided into seven by seven squares, which are grouped by thick lines into nine regions, six land regions and three water regions.

Each player takes one yellow "king" piece and 15 other pieces, three of each kind (green, blue, white, red, and black).

Each player's 16 pieces are placed next to the board, on each player's side of the board. (Later in the game, pieces will be removed from the board; removed pieces are put to the left or right of the board, and are not available to either player.)

The next step is to decide who goes first. This can be done, for instance, by flipping one of the king pieces like a coin; the other player calls "spot" or "blank". Or by playing a game of Alchemy (rules available on BoardGameGeek).

The player that goes first turns their pieces so the spot sides are up. The other players turns them spot side down.

The game is now ready to begin. On their first turn, each player places their king on one of the two rows closest to themselves. They then continue to alternate turns until the game ends.

OBJECTIVE

The goal of the game is to remove the opponent's king from the board.

YELLOW (king)

The king cannot move. When a player's king is removed from the game for any reason, that player has lost.

The king's special ability is to bring other pieces into play. When this ability is used, the piece is placed on any of the eight squares surrounding the king, or on any of the eight squares surrounding any friendly elemental piece.

Pieces may not be deployed on top of other pieces.

The king may only summon one piece per turn.

ELEMENTAL UNITS

The elemental units are the workhorses of the game. On a turn, an elemental may move up to a certain number of squares in any of the eight orthogonal and diagonal directions. The intervening squares may contain friendly pieces, but not hostile ones.

An elemental may land on a hostile piece, and then remove it from the game; this is called "capturing". They may not move to squares containing friendly pieces.

The four types of elementals have their own characteristics:

GREEN (land unit)

The green pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn. Unlike blues and whites, greens can change directions in the middle of a turn, and may return to their starting square (effectively passing a turn).

They must always remain on land.

They can conduct land-to-water assaults: if an enemy on a water square next to land could've been reached if the square was land, the green piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

BLUE (water unit)

The blue pieces may move up to three spaces in a turn, in a straight line.

They must always remain on water.

They can conduct water-to-land assaults: if an enemy on a land square next to water could've been reached if the square was water, the blue piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

WHITE (air unit)

The white pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn, in a straight line.

These are all-rounder units: they're not as fast as blues, nor do they maneuver as easily as the greens, but they can traverse any kind of territory.

RED (fire unit)

The red pieces may only move one space in a turn. They can traverse any kind of territory.

Whenever a player moves their red piece, after the move, any hostile pieces next to it are repelled from the red piece, one square in a straight line.

If the repel causes any piece to be pushed off the board, or pushed into a space it cannot occupy (green piece into water, blue piece into land, or any piece into another piece), or pushed despite being immobile (kings or bombs), that piece is removed from the game. (Any bombs thus removed are detonated before the pushed pieces are moved.)

BLACK (bomb)

The black pieces are bombs. They cannot be moved after being placed.

When a bomb is activated by a player, it is removed from the game.

Whenever a bomb is removed from the game for any reason, it explodes! All pieces on the eight surrounding squares are also removed from the game.

END OF GAME

A player wins if the other player has their king removed from the game, or if the other player resigns. The game is drawn if both players agree, if both kings are destroyed at the same time, if it's impossible for either player to win, or if the same position (including the same piece reserves) repeats three times.



RULES FOR SYMBOL

SET-UP

Place the game board such that each player has a green land area next to them, with the blue water area in between. The board is divided into seven by seven squares, which are grouped by thick lines into nine regions, six land regions and three water regions.

Each player takes one yellow "king" piece and 15 other pieces. In the standard setup, the pieces are divided evenly: each player gets three of each kind. (Other setups are possible, see Recommended Variants.)

Each player's 16 pieces are placed next to the board, on each player's side of the board. (Later in the game, pieces will be removed from the board; removed pieces are put to the left or right of the board, and are not available to either player.)

The next step is to decide who goes first. This can be done, for instance, by flipping one of the king pieces like a coin; the other player calls "spot" or "blank". Or by playing a game of Alchemy (rules available on BoardGameGeek).

The player that goes first turns their pieces so the spot sides are up. The other players turns them spot side down.

The game is now ready to begin. On their first turn, each player places their king on one of the two rows closest to themselves. They then continue to alternate turns until the game ends.

OBJECTIVE

The goal of the game is to remove the opponent's king from the board.

YELLOW (king)

The king cannot move, except as part of a stack. When a player's king is removed from the game for any reason, that player has lost.

The king's special ability is to bring other pieces into play. When this ability is used, the piece is placed on any of the eight squares surrounding the king, or on the king itself. Bombs may also be placed on or next to friendly elementals. (This counts as the king's action, not the other piece's action.)

Pieces may not be deployed on top of the opponent's pieces.

At first, the king is limited to one piece per turn. If a player controls three regions, that player's king may summon up to two pieces per turn. With six regions controlled, the limit is raised to three. ("Controlling" a region means being the only player who has pieces in that region.)

When deploying multiple pieces, they can be placed on the same square, or on different squares.

ELEMENTAL UNITS

The elemental units are the workhorses of the game. On a turn, an elemental may move up to a certain number of squares in any of the eight orthogonal and diagonal directions. The intervening squares may contain friendly pieces, but not hostile ones.

An elemental may land on a hostile piece or stack, and then remove it from the game; this is called "capturing", and ends the movement. They may move to squares containing friendly pieces; see the section on stacks.

The four types of elementals have their own characteristics:

GREEN (land unit)

The green pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn. Unlike blues and whites, greens can change directions in the middle of a turn, and may return to their starting square (effectively passing a turn).

They must always remain on land, except when stacked with other types of pieces. When used as the transport in a stack, the starting square may be on water, but the intervening and stopping squares must be on land. However, water squares containing friendly pieces may be traversed as easily as land.

They can conduct land-to-water assaults: if an enemy on a water square next to land could've been reached if the square was land, the green piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

BLUE (water unit)

The blue pieces may move up to three spaces in a turn, in a straight line.

They must always remain on water, except when stacked with other types of pieces. When used as the transport in a stack, the starting square may be on land, but the intervening and destination squares must be on water. However, land squares containing friendly pieces may be traversed as easily as water.

They can conduct water-to-land assaults: if an enemy on a land square next to water could've been reached if the square was water, the blue piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

WHITE (air unit)

The white pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn, in a straight line.

These are all-rounder units: they're not as fast as blues, nor do they maneuver as easily as the greens, but they can traverse any kind of territory.

RED (fire unit)

The red pieces may only move one space in a turn. They can traverse any kind of territory.

Whenever a player moves their red piece, after the move, any hostile pieces next to it are repelled from the red piece, one square in a straight line.

If the repel causes any piece to be pushed off the board, or pushed into a space it cannot occupy (unsupported green into water, unsupported blue into land, or any piece into a hostile piece), or pushed despite being immobile (kings/bombs not stacked with an elemental), that piece is removed from the game. (Any bombs thus removed are detonated before the pushed pieces are moved.)

A piece pushed into a friendly piece forms a stack.

BLACK (bomb)

The black pieces are bombs. They cannot be moved after being placed, except as part of a stack.

When a bomb is activated by its owner, it is removed from the game.

Whenever a bomb is removed from the game for any reason, it explodes! All pieces on that square and on the eight surrounding squares are also removed from the game. This can cause a chain reaction, if any of the surrounding squares contains a bomb.

STACKS

There may be more than one friendly piece on the same square. This is called a "stack". A stack or part of a stack can move as one piece, and has all the powers of its component pieces, with some restrictions. (There's no upper limit to how big stacks can be, but in practice, stacks that are bigger than five pieces are too much trouble to be worth it.)

When a player decides to use a stack, there are three potential phases of the turn:

1. Activate powers

If the yellow piece (king) is on the beginning square, it may summon one (or two or three, if enough regions are controlled) pieces. This may be done before moving, or instead of a move.

If a black piece (bomb) is on the beginning square, it may be detonated, destroying the stack and everything on the eight adjacent squares.

2. Move, optionally capture

One of the elemental pieces in the stack (or part of stack) to be moved is chosen as a "transport". The stack moves as a whole while complying with the transport's restrictions.

The stack may land on an opposing piece to capture it, or use the transport's special capture ability, if it has one.

A stack may move through friendly pieces, but may not pick up or drop off any pieces in intervening squares.

If a red piece is moved, even if it's not the transport, its repel ability is activated immediately after the move. (This does not apply to a red piece which is already sitting on the target square.)

3. Activate powers after move

If a yellow or black piece is on the destination square, its powers may be used as before the move; however, powers may not be used both before and after the move.

END OF GAME

A player wins if the other player has their king removed from the game, or if the other player resigns. The game is drawn if both players agree, if both kings are destroyed at the same time, if it's impossible for either player to win, or if the same position (including the same piece reserves) repeats three times.

OFFICIAL VARIANTS

Different armies: Instead of playing with three of each unit type, a player may use any combination of units to compose their 15-piece force. For extra flexibility when composing forces, consider purchasing an extra set of pieces from Nestorgames.

Battle Bay: This is an alternate game board available from Nestorgames as part of the Symbol² expansion. It is seven by seven squares, like the default board, but the three regions on the left side are all land, on the right side all water. This opens up for quite different tactics.

Hexagonal Warfare: This is an alternate game board available from Nestorgames as part of the Symbol² expansion. Unlike the other two boards, it is composed of hexagons. Pieces move in any of the six directions. This board is very cramped (37 hexes, instead of 49 squares).

OTHER VARIANTS

Unlimited reinforcements: Each player only gets eight pieces, in addition to the king. When a piece is removed from the game, it is returned to its owner, who may put it back into play on another turn.

Turncoats: When a piece is captured by the opponent, it is flipped over and put into the inventory of the opposing player, who may put it back into play on his side - a bit like Shogi. (This may or may not include pieces destroyed through other means than capture.)

Region control tiebreaker: When a draw occurs, rather than simply letting the game remain unsettled, the winner is the one who controls the most regions.
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Daniel Piovezan
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Ahm, in that case, I won't be reading the simplified rules right now, ok? I'll leave them for when we're done with the full rules.

Quote:
One player turns the pieces so they have the little spots facing up, the other player turns them with the spots facing down.
(...)
The next step is to decide who goes first.

The Nestor rules state that the player with the spots facing up goes first. But it's correct that that's only done after players have (optionally) assembled their armies.

Quote:
Each player's 16 pieces are placed in front of them, at the upper and lower edges of the board. (Later in the game, pieces will be removed from the board; removed pieces are put to the left or right of the board, and are not available to either player.)

This could be interpreted as placing pieces on the cells closest to the players, not outside of the board.

Quote:
The king's special ability is to bring other pieces into play. When this ability is used, the piece is placed on any of the eight squares surrounding the king, or on the king itself. Bombs may also be placed on or next to friendly elementals.

So, in order to deploy a bomb, regardless of where, that's a king's action, right? If so, it should be made clear. Cause, say the king is in stack A. If I deploy a bomb on stack B, I can't move stack B, but I can move stack A.

Quote:
Pieces may not be deployed on top of the opponent's pieces.

I don't think that's true for the full rules.

Quote:
At first, the king is limited to deploying one piece per turn. If a player controls three regions, that player's king may summon up to two pieces per turn. With six regions controlled, the limit is raised to three. ("Controlling" a region means being the only player who has pieces in that region.)

May I add: the deployed pieces don't have to go all on the same square.

It doesn't describe what a region is, and this might not be the best place to do so. Maybe you could add another section, in the very beginning, describing board and pieces?

Quote:
An elemental may land on a hostile piece or stack, and then remove it from the game; this is called "capturing".

Capturing a piece ends the movement.

Quote:
The green pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn. Unlike blues and whites, greens can change directions in the middle of a turn, and may return to their starting square (effectively passing a turn).

Yeah, this raises questions. On another thread, it is stated that you may move a red piece 0 squares, using its effect. The whole question of passing needs to be addressed.

Quote:
They must always remain on land, except when stacked with other types of pieces. When used as the transport in a stack, the starting square may be on water, but the intervening and stopping squares must be on land. However, water squares containing friendly pieces may be traversed as easily as land.

I think this is really good!

Quote:
They can conduct land-to-water assaults: if an enemy on a water square next to land could've been reached if the square was land, the blue green piece can [move up next to it and] capture the enemy.

Seems good enough. Not idiot-proof*, but it would be with an example picture.

*it's ok for me to use the expression "idiot-proof", cause usually I'm the idiot.

Quote:
BLUE (water unit)

The green blue pieces may move up to three spaces in a turn, in a straight line.


Quote:
If the repel causes any piece to be pushed off the board, or pushed into a space it cannot occupy (unsupported green into water, unsupported blue into land, or any piece into a hostile piece), or pushed despite being immobile (kings/bombs not stacked with an elemental), that piece is removed from the game. (Any bombs thus removed are detonated on the beginning square.)

The original version of the rules (I mean the most recent ones posted by the designer) state that a pushed bomb is detonated BEFORE any other piece is pushed. That would remove the pushing red piece, but I assume the other pieces are pushed anyway. I'd like Ben to confirm that.

It should also say that an enemy piece pushed onto a piece or stack belonging to that same player becomes part of that stack.

The rules suggest that a piece pushed onto a hostile bomb is simply removed, without triggering that bomb. That seems counter-intuitive to me, so I'd like Ben to confirm that too.

Quote:
When a bomb is activated by a player, it is removed from the game.

This suggests that any player can activate any bomb, not just the ones belonging to him.

Quote:
Whenever a bomb is removed from the game for any reason, it explodes! All pieces on that square and on the eight surrounding squares are also removed from the game.

And there's chain reactions!

Quote:
STACKS
(...)

About that whole section: I couldn't have done better.

Quote:
If a red piece is moved, even if it's not the transport, its repel ability is activated immediately after the move.

That's what I think makes sense. But I'd like to be sure that a red piece sitting in the target square before the move wouldn't trigger the effect as well.

Quote:
A player wins if the other player has their king removed from the game, or if the other player resigns. The game is drawn if both players agree, if both kings are destroyed at the same time, if it's impossible for either player to win, or if the same position (including the same piece reserves) repeats three times.

Why do you mention piece reserves?

Quote:
Turncoats: When a piece is removed from the game, it is flipped over and put into the inventory of the opposing player, who may put it back into play on his side - a bit like Shogi.

So every piece just changes sides? Regardless of whose action caused the piece to be removed?

You've done some great work here, Ola, really.
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Ola S.
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Thank you! I'll add most of your fixes and clarifications to the full version right away, letting the combined version languish for a bit.

Some notes:

Quote:
Quote:
Pieces may not be deployed on top of the opponent's pieces.

I don't think that's true for the full rules.


From the Nestorgames PDF, page 4: "A player cannot reinforce by adding a new piece directly on top of an opponent's piece."

Quote:
Quote:
The green pieces may move up to two spaces in a turn. Unlike blues and whites, greens can change directions in the middle of a turn, and may return to their starting square (effectively passing a turn).

Yeah, this raises questions. On another thread, it is stated that you may move a red piece 0 squares, using its effect. The whole question of passing needs to be addressed.


I'm afraid I'm not entirely sure how to handle this situation. It would seem to be easiest to define red's repel effect so that it mandatorily happens after moving (including a green move back to the same square) but can't be activated while standing still; so that it's an inherent part of moving a red, rather than a power which is mandatory some times and voluntary some other times, which seems overly fiddly to me. But yes, we would need word from Ben Stanley on this one.

Quote:
Quote:
If the repel causes any piece to be pushed off the board, or pushed into a space it cannot occupy (unsupported green into water, unsupported blue into land, or any piece into a hostile piece), or pushed despite being immobile (kings/bombs not stacked with an elemental), that piece is removed from the game. (Any bombs thus removed are detonated on the beginning square.)

The original version of the rules (I mean the most recent ones posted by the designer) state that a pushed bomb is detonated BEFORE any other piece is pushed. That would remove the pushing red piece, but I assume the other pieces are pushed anyway. I'd like Ben to confirm that.


I'm not sure where to find this most recent version. Do you have a link?

Quote:
The rules suggest that a piece pushed onto a hostile bomb is simply removed, without triggering that bomb. That seems counter-intuitive to me, so I'd like Ben to confirm that too.


In general, given a more and a less fiddly option, I go for the less fiddly one: "any piece pushed into a hostile piece is removed" versus "any piece pushed into a hostile piece is removed, and if that hostile piece is a bomb it's detonated".

Quote:
Quote:
A player wins if the other player has their king removed from the game, or if the other player resigns. The game is drawn if both players agree, if both kings are destroyed at the same time, if it's impossible for either player to win, or if the same position (including the same piece reserves) repeats three times.

Why do you mention piece reserves?


Because I don't think having the same pieces on the board but with different piece reserves counts as the same position.

Hypothetical example: A king on the bottom row summons a green piece on the second row, and an opposing blue piece on the third row captures it without moving. This happens three times in a row. Does that count as a threefold repetition? I don't think so.

For the rest, I'll add in clarifications. Thank you for your kind words.
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Daniel Piovezan
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negat1ve wrote:
Quote:
Quote:
Pieces may not be deployed on top of the opponent's pieces.

I don't think that's true for the full rules.


From the Nestorgames PDF, page 4: "A player cannot reinforce by adding a new piece directly on top of an opponent's piece."

Oh, you're right, I totally misread that.

negat1ve wrote:
I'm not sure where to find this most recent version. Do you have a link?

Why, of course, it's right here.

negat1ve wrote:
Quote:
Quote:
A player wins if the other player has their king removed from the game, or if the other player resigns. The game is drawn if both players agree, if both kings are destroyed at the same time, if it's impossible for either player to win, or if the same position (including the same piece reserves) repeats three times.

Why do you mention piece reserves?


Because I don't think having the same pieces on the board but with different piece reserves counts as the same position.

Hypothetical example: A king on the bottom row summons a green piece on the second row, and an opposing blue piece on the third row captures it without moving. This happens three times in a row. Does that count as a threefold repetition? I don't think so.

Ooh, that makes total sense. I think you could add that example to the rules.

negat1ve wrote:
For the rest, I'll add in clarifications. Thank you for your kind words.

You're welcome!
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