Adam Ruzzo
United States
Manchester
Connecticut
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My friend seems to see an interpretation of the rules (due to the wording of an example on page 32) that suggests that the exploitation distance is a maximum number of total hexes into which the attacking force (as a whole) can enter, rather than applying to each individual unit. Specifically this example:

"Example: A Russian one-step ground unit suffers a Dr3 0/1 result. It
Retreats three hexes and then is eliminated. The Exploitation Distance
is 3. The attacking force can be placed in up to three hexes – that is,
the defending hex and two other hexes."

Example if his interpretation is correct: You had 2 exploiting units with a distance of 3 hexes. First unit enters the defending hex and then moves 2 other hexes. The second unit enters the defending hex, and then *must follow the previous unit* because the previous unit already used all exploitation distance.

The test of the rules seems pretty clear to me, that the exploitation distance is applied to each exploiting unit, and the movements of one do not affect the other.
 
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Marc Hanna
United States
Eastbourne, England (Yankee go home!)
Florida
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Hi Adam, you are right, each exploiter moves on its own as long as first hex entered is defender's vacated hex; there is no language forcing other defenders to follow in such a manner. All exploiters are limited by their own movement allowances and enemy ZOCs unless negated by the presence of friendly units.
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