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Subject: Life After the Strike - My Fallout Review rss

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Chad McCallum
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The mobile friendly version with pictures is available here: http://www.ofdiceandmen.ca/2017/12/17/Life-After-the-Strike-...

Fallout sucks.

Maybe it’s because of the hype that I set up for myself (although Man vs Meeple played no small part in that), or my experience with the very successful video game franchise of the same name. At the end of my first game there weren’t a lot of adjectives I could use to describe my experience other than “...this sucked”.

I owe you an explanation. Fallout is a recently released board game based on the video games of the same name, where players find themselves doing their best to survive and thrive in the wastelands of the United States of America. You’ll find yourself controlling a Super Mutant, Ghoul, Wastelander, Brotherhood member, or Vault member while you navigate the radiated landscape and avoiding various threats while trying to complete story-based objectives.

That doesn’t matter.

The game mostly revolves around a major narrative tied to one of the four scenarios that come in the base game, where players side with either of the scenario-specific factions in an attempt to ultimately control the wasteland through influence. The quests progress through a neat “story deck” where after resolving a particular chapter of the story you’re told to ‘stage’ certain numbered cards which provide the next chapter and options to progress.

That doesn’t matter.

Another unique part of the game is the level system. Much like the video games characters can progress through the S.P.E.C.I.A.L. system, gaining perks and tokens as they gain experience in the game through killing enemies and progressing through the various quests. As players gain experience the unique level system takes longer for players to level up, once again mimicking the video game experience.

That doesn’t matter.

Combat is another mechanic that is inspired its digital ancestor. When you fight an enemy you roll custom six-sided dice that resemble the V.A.T.S. system from the game, looking for symbols that match your target’s weak spot. Those same dice will hand out wounds representing your quarry fighting back during the struggle, and are also used for the various skill checks in the game.

That… well, you get the point.

The reason why none of these things actually matter is that there’s no player agency in this game. The whole reason most players play the Fallout video games is to forge their own path - you decide if you back the Institute or the Railroad, the Brotherhood or the Mutants. That entire concept, the whole reason players are motivated to forge their own path in the wasteland, is reduced to a random card draw.

The game revolves around “agenda cards”, all with various goals on them that award victory points for certain conditions. Conditions ranging from “explore most of the map” and “hit max level”, or, more commonly, rewarding you for the progress of one of the two scenario factions.

The first recommended scenario has you siding with either the Railroad or the Institute. Except, you don’t get to pick sides - you back which ever side you draw the card for. You, as a player, don’t get to make the fundamental choice that plays such a huge part in the video game franchise, but instead play according to whatever random card you pick up during the game. You’re no longer playing the game, rather you’re just doing your best to live up to the destiny a deck of 24 cards decided you should have.

This is particularly jarring when, playing as a huge lumbering Super Mutant, you’re required to tiptoe around Megaton to gather information. Even more so when you’re playing The Pitt scenario and you’re forced to side with the slavers.

You also don’t necessarily start with a faction alignment. You could get half way through the game, draw the card for the weaker faction, and suddenly everyone else is 3 points ahead of you in a 9 point game. Or, just as bad, you could draw the same faction alignment as them and suddenly you’re playing a semi-co-operative game but no one knows it. Randomly picking up a card that suddenly gives you half your points is a game-breaking design flaw.

Furthermore, the game almost mocks your lack of choice by making you role-play the encounter cards (cards your draw for random experiences in cities & bunkers) - you’re required to make a choice against a narrative without seeing the result, which is the exact opposite of how you’re expected to play the quest cards.

“Play without the Agendas!” the internet says in defense of their beloved IP board game. First off, we’re way past the point at which major releases of board games should require house rules out of the box. Secondly, there are so many other problems with this game.

Even if you could pick the path of the story, the paragraphs you read are just short enough to avoid painting enough of a narrative worth pursuing. Playing multiplayer? That quest goal that was just given to you in confidence by an NPC can be completed on the next turn by another player on the other side of the map. Enemies are little more than a hindrance that you kite around the map, killing when you need them. One quarter of the bunker narrative cards have to do with saving pets. The level system isn’t much more than a reroll tracker - if you have a letter that corresponds to a check, you get to reroll those three fancy custom dice. You get your letters via a random draw, not according to your achievements in the game - you draw two, pick one. The combat and resolution system is basically Yahtzee, except with only three dice, and less than three rerolls.

First PostHuman, now Fallout - I’m still waiting for a well-done post-apocalyptic board game. Let me know if you find one.
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If you think game's narrative doesn't matter, then you probably look for something different in a post-apocalyptic themed game and this game is clearly not for you. So I think you are wrong(because you are disliking the game because it not being the game YOU want, not because of bad mechanics, components, etc.) and this review doesn't matter.
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Chad McCallum
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I guess it's not the fact that the narrative itself doesn't matter, but your involvement in it doesn't matter, because you don't really have any choice in the matter. I can't make my Wastelander side with the Railroad if I don't get the appropriate Agenda card, or if I do side with them regardless of the agendas I draw I'm suddenly playing a different game, one that the designer(s) didn't intend.

The Agenda cards (as well as quite a few other aspects) is the mechanic that I'm arguing is objectively bad. There's ways to fix it (see all the threads in this game forum), but my argument is I shouldn't have to fix something out of the box.

But, like any other opinion on the internet, you don't have to agree with mine
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Brendan McGuire
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Thanks for the review!

I love the Fallout video game IP in all it's implementations (even the new Fallout 4 which is more a FPS than an RPG). When I heard of the boardgame, it was an instant buy in my mind. But then after seeing it played, it turned it into a wait and see that I couldn't quite put my finger on. It definitely looks like Fallout, but something about it didn't feel like Fallout. It still doesn't look like a bad game, but if you are going to slap an IP theme onto a game, then that theme better drip with the IP.

As far as other post-apocalyptic games. I have enjoyed Salvation Road and Saltlands. I'm also looking forward to Wasteland Express Delivery Service. I think this genre is starting to be the new zombies, which means we will see a lot of duds, but there will occasionally be that gem.
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Chad McCallum
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I do actually think the theme and narrative from the video game series is translated very well into the board game, but that one critical aspect - being able to pick which direction you want the story to go - is blatantly ignored. Most of the other negative aspects of the game could be overlooked but that one particular part (taking the role-playing out of the RPG) is such a jarring change from what fans of the original series would expect that I feel it ruins a game.

I haven't had a chance to try Saltlands but I was really interested in the kickstarter (can't remember why I didn't back it, probably backing something else at the time) and the artwork looks amazing. I'll have to see if anyone has a copy locally and take it for a spin!
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RTigger wrote:
I do actually think the theme and narrative from the video game series is translated very well into the board game, but that one critical aspect - being able to pick which direction you want the story to go - is blatantly ignored.
I'm with you there.

There seems to be a mini-trend in boardgaming right now of cramming RPG elements into boardgames, but done in such a way that you feel more like a spectator than an actual player of the game. I'm not a fan. Fallout is such a huge, sprawling, slowly unfolding experience that I almost wish there was a Mage Knight version of it, where you could get the combat & the adventure & the grinding & the long experience all in one game.

Because you're right, this game leaves you feeling like a spectator.
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Quote:
The first recommended scenario has you siding with either the Railroad or the Institute. Except, you don’t get to pick sides - you back which ever side you draw the card for. You, as a player, don’t get to make the fundamental choice that plays such a huge part in the video game franchise, but instead play according to whatever random card you pick up during the game. You’re no longer playing the game, rather you’re just doing your best to live up to the destiny a deck of 24 cards decided you should have.


Quote:
“Play without the Agendas!” the internet says in defense of their beloved IP board game. First off, we’re way past the point at which major releases of board games should require house rules out of the box. Secondly, there are so many other problems with this game.


Once upon a time there used to be this thing called imagination. With it, one was able to forge their own story given little context clues and tidbits of information. One would "fill in the gaps" so to speak.

I'll stop the sarcasm and get straight to the point: You simply can't expect a game trying to capture the ENTIRE scope of 2 full Fallout games (and the scope of the entire franchise) to be able to tell the story for you. A lot of people disagree about how well the questing/encounter system works. And I think for those people it's because they understand you aren't going to get a true RPG board game out of this title. While everything you mention is definitely subjective and valid, it also seems to be coming from a place of missed expectations.

I totally get what you're saying. Overall the Role playing and the freedom that all the video games provide is not present here. It's very much on rails, and for me that's fantastic. I think for a Fallout board game to actually capture the video game with at least 80% of the video games charm, you'd have to make the board game the size and scope of Gloomhaven.

In this case, FFG's goal was to release a board game that felt definitively like the modern Fallouts and market it to the crowds that like those same games. Hence the Game Stop "partnership."

So why does everything you say not turn me off of this game? Because my love of the Fallout video games is really more big picture. I love the aesthetic of the world design. I LOVE the concept of post apocalyptic wasteland especially when the style of everything has not evolved past the 50s. I love the creatures, monsters, and group cultures. I like the items, weapons, and armor, the character archtypes and most of all the ability to explore. Maybe you like this stuff too, but the direction of your review was very much based on the lack of rpg narrative in this board game. I can't disagree with you there, but I do think it won't matter so much if one goes into this game simply wanting to experience the Fallout world. And on top of that? experience the Fallout world with friends. Something that has never been possible cooperatively or semi-cooperatively in the video games.

---------------

As a bonus jest

Quote:
you’re required to make a choice against a narrative without seeing the result, which is the exact opposite of how you’re expected to play the quest cards.


Isn't that what we do everyday? Make choices against some random narrative without seeing the results first? I know I wouldn't have taken a particular road home yesterday if I knew there was going to be an accident that backed it up for a half hour.
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Aaron Day
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RTigger wrote:
The Agenda cards (as well as quite a few other aspects) is the mechanic that I'm arguing is objectively bad. There's ways to fix it (see all the threads in this game forum), but my argument is I shouldn't have to fix something out of the box.


You're missing the brilliant themeing here. All Bethesda Fallout games are dependent on the player community fixing them through the use of mods. FFG's Fallout game is the same. It's genius really.
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RTigger wrote:
The Agenda cards (as well as quite a few other aspects) is the mechanic that I'm arguing is objectively bad. There's ways to fix it (see all the threads in this game forum), but my argument is I shouldn't have to fix something out of the box.

But, like any other opinion on the internet, you don't have to agree with mine


Well, ok then. But I expect FFG to "fix" the agenda system with an expansion like what they did with Star Wars: Rebellion and its' expansion. Because of that and because of story you experience being the most important thing for me(winning is just a bonus) it doesn't bother me that much, but it can be different for you of course like you said.
 
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Chad McCallum
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Thanks for the well thought out reply! This is why I love posting my reviews on BGG, the potential for discussion is great.

I do agree with you, everything else about the Fallout universe is in this game. The production quality is top notch, the artwork matches the aesthetic of the video game, there's no mistaking this is a Fallout game. In that I think we both agree they did a stellar job.

As you said I think the aspects of the Fallout universe that I enjoy - the role-playing - was the aspect I was expecting to feel when playing this game, since it was such a huge part of the video game series. It's hard to imagine a role-playing game without the role-playing. For those who aren't looking for such an experience, there's a decent enough game here. I actually think the target audience for this game is "video gamers" rather than "board gamers", as you inferred was their reasoning behind the game stop partnership.

I do believe that without the faction-based Agenda cards (and some sort of adequate replacement) this could be a "good" game in this context. Not the best one in the space (like you said other games have set this bar quite high) but decent enough to share.

Regarding the jest, those encounter cards are almost exactly what I'd expect from the quest cards - here's your options, find out what happens after you trigger it. Much like real life The fact that they expect you to play it one way for quests and another for encounters was the upsetting part
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RTigger wrote:
Thanks for the well thought out reply! This is why I love posting my reviews on BGG, the potential for discussion is great.

I do agree with you, everything else about the Fallout universe is in this game. The production quality is top notch, the artwork matches the aesthetic of the video game, there's no mistaking this is a Fallout game. In that I think we both agree they did a stellar job.

As you said I think the aspects of the Fallout universe that I enjoy - the role-playing - was the aspect I was expecting to feel when playing this game, since it was such a huge part of the video game series. It's hard to imagine a role-playing game without the role-playing. For those who aren't looking for such an experience, there's a decent enough game here. I actually think the target audience for this game is "video gamers" rather than "board gamers", as you inferred was their reasoning behind the game stop partnership.

I do believe that without the faction-based Agenda cards (and some sort of adequate replacement) this could be a "good" game in this context. Not the best one in the space (like you said other games have set this bar quite high) but decent enough to share.

Regarding the jest, those encounter cards are almost exactly what I'd expect from the quest cards - here's your options, find out what happens after you trigger it. Much like real life The fact that they expect you to play it one way for quests and another for encounters was the upsetting part


Ultimately, I don't think you're in the wrong for expecting an RPG game. You are right, Fallout as a whole is very much built on being an RPG. Some video games in the series do this better then others of course, but as a whole, it is definitely a game that lets you role play and make decisions that affect the overall story.

But I don't think Fallout is trying to be an RPG game. In fact, some might say it is trying to be too much, but perhaps that's the nature of trying to cram a franchise the size of Fallout inside a cardboard box to entice video gamers (a potentially huge untapped market; by the way, I do wonder how that's working for them, strictly out of curiosity).

What you said here:

Quote:
It's hard to imagine a role-playing game without the role-playing. For those who aren't looking for such an experience, there's a decent enough game here.


I'd change it ever so slightly to:

"For those who don't need such an experience ..."

I think just as many people who pick the game up expecting an RPG are going to pick the game up expecting to be immersed in the Fallout world. I definitely fall in the second camp and you in the first. Thankfully, we can put aside those differences to logically discuss how FFG could make it a better game.

I for one hope for expansions!

Also whoever made the comment about how all Bethesda titles require users to fix it through mods. That is hilariously accurate.

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Given FFG's MO, I feel like they've done the usual "here's 80% of the game to make sure it'll do well, then we'll release the final 20% as an expansion" play. I can't see them not releasing expansions for the series, and hope that they take the time to twist the gameplay more towards the role-playing side (maybe even an official variant?) The monster tiles, starting encounter decks, and perks could definitely use more content!

+1 to the user-mods comment - that made me spit take my coffee
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Thanks for the review.

I've got 3 solo-games and 1 2-player game under my belt now, and my thoughts last night turned to whether or not this game is a "keep" or a "sell while it's hot and limited availability".

I love the choices in this game, but I agree with you that the freedom of choice feels pretty quickly removed based on agenda-card draws. The question, then, is this: am I uncomfortable because I want this game to be an open-world RPG that I can explore and choose freely for myself, or am I willing to accept that the game is making the thematic decisions for me (vis-a-vis the agenda draws) and the objective is really about making optimal choices, under a time constraint, to defeat all opponents (the other survivors and the Scenario factions).

My expectations were not met because I came into this game thinking of it as the RPG - choosing who I wanted my character to be and trying to win my own way. I think this game is really more about discovering who you are through the course of the game and making the best choices along the way, to both survive and ultimately to fulfill the destiny that the agenda cards lay out for your character.

When I let go of my expectations and accepted that my job was not to decide who I was but to find out who I was, I decided that I wanted to keep exploring the Wasteland.
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You nailed it with this review. I LOVE fallout and was super stoked to introduce the theme to a multiplayer setting. I'm beyond disappointed that this game will never see the light of day with my friends.
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I have played Fallout and Fallout:Las Vegas and I liked them a lot.
I loved speccing my character out and I would often replay the beginning few hours of the game over and over just trying to optimize my stats and how they interacted with the equipment.

RPG immersion aside here ... my question is ...

Is the game fun?
Are there interesting decisions and suspenseful moments?
Do you leave the game wanting to play it again the next time
your group meets up?
 
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Chad McCallum
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I can't imagine this is a surprise to you after reading my review, but the answer to all of those questions for me is No.

Perhaps my group isn't the target audience for this game (as discussed in an earlier comment, it may be geared towards those less familiar with board games), but I didn't have fun because of the lack of interesting decisions - in most cases it only makes sense to make the decision that benefits your agenda cards, so there really isn't any decision to be made. The only uncertainty in the game comes from inconsequential encounter cards and the combat dice, and I wouldn't describe either of those as "suspenseful".

That said, if you liked Fallout for the theme and the character specs, there might be enough of a game here for you to enjoy it. My main source of fun for the video game series was making decisions that affected the railroad / institute / brotherhood / etc., and that aspect is already done for you in this game.
 
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Shelby Babb
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Defenders of the Last Stand, maybe?
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Ezequiel Vieira
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Outlive?
 
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Waste Knights !
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JL San Miguel
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Have a go at...

1 - Fallen Land: A Post Apocalyptic Board Game

2 - Waste Knights

...

Neon Dawn ? (Xia in the wastelands? whistle )

Maybe
Bright Future, Defenders of the last stand, Outlive,...


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Howard Massey
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Yes, a good list.
Variable complexities & game times.

Will have to look into Aftermath .
It's new to me.
 
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As a huge fan of all the fallout video games ( fallout 1 and fallout 3 are my favorites), on first impression I agree there's something un-fallout about the agenda design. The emphasis on factions in general too. When I read the game's objective is gaining influence to "control the wasteland" I knew it was going to feel different from the games.

In the older video games siding with a faction is a side thing you do as part of a larger story. Maybe you join the brotherhood to get some power armor but you still need to Find the GECK/water chip, Find your Dad/baby, or that etc.. dominating the wasteland with a faction wasn't required unless you wanted to do that. You're free to make choices.

Granted in Fallout 3 you're steamrolled into joining the BOS, but it was tied into your character's personal mission. I suppose the game is more like Fallout 3 in that regard - getting born into a certain faction agenda

I still enjoy this game a lot aside from that though it's just a different flavor than the video games
 
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Brett Leeson
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FWIW I think your review is dead on. The game so far reminds me, oddly enough, of nothing more than the end of Mass Effect 3. Bear with me here; the developers hyped the way all of your choices would play into the final ending, they gave an interview where they stressed that your decisions would matter, and that the end of that game - the trilogy, really - would be more than just a matter of picking A, B, or C.

And then you literally push one of 3 buttons to select your ending, nothing you'd done in the previous 2 games mattered, and only a handful of your choices in that game were reflected in some brief snippets inserted into the final cut scene. After this trilogy of meaningful decisions, the ending robbed you of your agency as a player and was a huge letdown.

I had a bit of deja vu as we played the Fallout board game - a franchise that I love a lot - and I think you nailed many of the reasons why, right on the head.

The combat system is elegant. The leveling system is genius. The cards, the board, just ooze theme and setting. And in the end, none of that really matters.

The very first main quest card you get hints at some of the problems to come. I don't think this is much of a spoiler but I guess potential spoiler warning if you haven't played the game or read any of the previews yet...

I don't have it in front of me but the first main quest card you come across gives you a choice like:
Spoiler (click to reveal)
1. Help the Institute - kill any human enemy
or
2. Help the Railroad - hike halfway across the map to Diamond City.


The problem is, ANY player meeting that first criteria, under any circumstances, before you manage to complete the second one, advances it in favor of that faction. It felt nearly impossible to manage the second option before the first one happened, and that set the tone for the game.

That faction quickly jumped out to the lead, and that made a problematic issue with the game even worse. I drew a Railroad agenda card as my starting one. That was fine; having played Fallout 4 I would have leaned that direction anyway, but the first main quest card is seriously tilted, as mentioned above, in favor of the Institute.

So it's entirely possible in this game to wind up in a situation where, narratively, you want to back one faction, but mechanically you're stuck backing the other faction by luck of the draw, but also mechanically certain quest step requirements are much easier to complete for the faction you don't have cards for, and you never manage to draw any cards that back the faction the game seems to favor.

I would have to go back and look at them and try to judge how many are weighted one way or the other, or how many seem more or less even, but the first one, basically 'anyone in the game kills any Human enemy, OR, travel halfway across the map, whichever comes first' starts things off on a pretty uneven foot.

It would be one thing if the game focused more heavily on the more random objective type agenda cards (finish your SPECIAL track, hoard 15+ caps), giving you different things to achieve while letting you back whatever faction you preferred. But fully 2/3 or 3/4 of the agenda cards are faction specific, and one player drawing a couple of those that favor whatever faction jumps out early can hugely tilt the game in their favor.

I just don't care for the way it handles your agency with regards to factions at all. It's the one very UN-Fallout feeling thing in the game; being pushed mechanically to support one faction over another, and then sometimes feeling punished for a choice that wasn't yours to make in the first place.

And that's not even touching on the ending of the game, which I'll get into separately.
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