Trevor Kuehl
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After ~10 plays with five different groups, I'm starting to feel like the only way to be competitive in this game is to specialize in one type of building. In almost every game, the player that has won has had buildings of only one or two colors maximum.

I realize that this is part of the structure of the game since you need to go to a specific sector to activate buildings. However, I feel like there are valuable actions in all sectors and it's disappointing that the game does not allow you to utilize all of them in a single game and still play optimally. It also means that whichever specialist player has the least competition in their sector has a huge advantage.

Anyone else have experience with this? Is there any way to win against, or at least slow down a specialist player?
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Jonathan Franklin
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Have a look at the Megastructures file here if you are looking for more from EE

https://www.boardgamegeek.com/filepage/148218/megastructures...

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Michael
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tjkuehl wrote:
Anyone else have experience with this? Is there any way to win against, or at least slow down a specialist player?


I don't mean to sound patronizing--this may be obvious to everyone already. Here are a few things that have helped me, when used together...

1. Get out in front on the U.N. track early, and stay there--make the other players chase you, not the other way around;
2. Watch the Achievement tiles for ones that will fit well into your strategy; collect no fewer than five, and work to earn the maximum (5) points from most or all of them;
3. Put a couple more workers into play fairly early--both to give you more options per round, and also to mitigate against "losing" one or two to Event cards later in the game;
4. Use at least two different types/colors of buildings, with mutually-reinforcing actions that create an engine that generates the resources you need to repeatedly move up the U.N. track (see #1), reduce pollution, purchase a power plant (up to five, especially those that do not pollute), stockpile a resource for which you will receive points at the end of the game (e.g., from an Achievement tile--see above), or trade for something else (e.g., more energy for Achievement tiles)--you want to be able to activate buildings in your tableau as often as possible; and
5. Pay attention to what other players' goals are, or appear to be, and consider taking actions that simultaneously are both beneficial to you and make it harder for the others to meet their goals as quickly.

The only other thing I can offer is that "sometimes the bear eats you." I win from time to time, but my spouse and kids just as often pound me into the ground in this game. That's why it's fun.
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Jonathan Franklin
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Michael, I totally agree with the four that are applicable to playing a single color strategy. I agree that a main color and a splash of something else can certainly work, but an engine built on two colors still only fires half your buildings per turn, so you really need them to work together exceptionally well.

To respond to the OP, if I see someone going single color, I try to make the really desirable spots in that color extremely expensive by adding extra zaps under the worker (more than I need to do to take the action) There seems to be a frenzy of building buying that tapers off later in the game. Since each color as two generally really good spots, you can more easily hurt the monocolor player by being a jerk than you can the multicolor player.
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Michael
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grandslam wrote:
Michael, I totally agree with the four that are applicable to playing a single color strategy. I agree that a main color and a splash of something else can certainly work, but an engine built on two colors still only fires half your buildings per turn, so you really need them to work together exceptionally well.

To respond to the OP, if I see someone going single color, I try to make the really desirable spots in that color extremely expensive by adding extra zaps under the worker (more than I need to do to take the action) There seems to be a frenzy of building buying that tapers off later in the game. Since each color as two generally really good spots, you can more easily hurt the monocolor player by being a jerk than you can the multicolor player.


Makes sense; thanks!

I don't mind pursuing a two-color strategy, as long as I can activate both colors every round. Having two options available has saved me a couple of times when another player (or two) choose "inopportune" times to pursue the same actions that I wanted to use.
 
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Luke Laurie
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I have played the game, of course, hundreds of times. The most significant factor in what makes a successful approach in a game of Energy Empire is how players respond to each other and to the available choices. There are some general strategic principles, but ignoring those situational tactical choices puts you in the position of making suboptimal moves, and potentially leaving them for your opponents.

In my last game, I won handily with a score of 107 using all three colors, and doing pretty good, but not excelling in every area. decent points on achievements, one away from the top of the UN, 4 pollution in my environment, but no more than three cards of each color.

You might want to try the beta online version to play against diverse opponents to see more diverse approaches.
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Michael
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Thank you!
 
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Luke Laurie
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Btw- that’s awesome that you’ve already played ten times. I haven’t played most games in my collection ten times!
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Björn Hansson
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Bromma
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In all my games I have never seen the "one color" strategy win. Two colors on the other hand works great. You need the flexibility.
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Clayton Weaver

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Missouri
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taragalinas wrote:
In all my games I have never seen the "one color" strategy win. Two colors on the other hand works great. You need the flexibility.
Its about 50/50 in my games between 'one color' and 'two colors'

The flexibility of two colors is certainly a lot easier to manage in terms of blocking other players and avoiding the other players blocking you.
 
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David A
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I think the intent of reaching a balance of the colors is the "perfect" scenario since any action *should* result in the ability to activate several effects. The challenge there is getting that perfect mix and set-up to happen. It's very difficult to achieve. I actually have won once with three-colors, but it was close and I certainly didn't reach that perfect mix, or even a good balance.

All that said, I've found I have most luck and best performance with a two color approach.

As with an earlier post, I've yet to see a one-color approach win a game.
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