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Subject: Part IV: Winter 41 rss

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Steven Fuller
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December 1941

The snow began to fall and the Germans were forced to dig in around Moscow. They had failed to take the city and the Soviet Union still existed. Its army, however, had been shattered, Ukraine had been captured and the Wehrmacht had made it way to the gates of the Soviet capital.

All across Europe the fascist powers reigned victorious. Now, locked in a life-or-death struggle with their communist rivals, the flames of war began to spread to the extremities. In the Middle East, where an Iraqi Uprising a month prior had succeeded and destroyed the quick British attempt to put it down, German ambassadors were concluding negotiations with Turkey. In the north, Finland had also begun its own war against the Soviets, stopping short of Leningrad but allowing German units from Norway to march eastward.

The Soviet Union was still very much in danger. It was being strangled along its entire western border, its command capacity was dangerously low, and it lacked the majority of its armoured and calvary forces. British supplies had been forced to cease due to the loss of Iraq; and its production, though receiving a boost as it pushed to total war, was still less than its Axis opponents.

Stavka now faced a difficult choice. A counteroffensive had been discussed but the current situation and lack of sufficient HQs meant any attack would be unable to achieve a breakthrough. The entry of Turkey into the war put most of the cadre-strength units on their border in immediate danger. As such Stalin ordered units from Stalingrad to the Don River, replacing units that were railed south to Batumi. The Moscow defensive line was also reorganized, with reserve units making their way to the front.

Hitler sensed the weakness of the Soviet Union. His armies mopped up Soviet remnants in the Moscow forest and he ordered his reserves up to the front, where they filled in any weak points and amassed at key positions around the capital. It was evident by the build-up that Germany was still sure it could win. Yet there was no significant fighting that bleak December, as millions of men stood waiting in the cold and snow for the bloody trials to come.

January 1942

The New Year heralded the coming of the third year of the war and the end was nowhere in sight. Both Germany and Britain seemed unassailable, but elsewhere the majority of the belligerents forces were tied down. His Majesty’s forces had taken Tobruk and Benghazi but now found their rear threatened by Iraq and Turkey. British ME allocation had not been increased because the decision had been made before Turkish entry, but it still far surpassed Axis allocation and a lucky convoy managed to bring the materials to form a mechanized cadre in Suez. It was hoping that scratch forces could be assembled to deal with Iraq as the rest of the Western Desert Force would focus on securing Libya.

In the larger scope of things, the previous month had seen a serious of geopolitical changes. Turkey, and more significantly, Japan, had joined the the war on the Axis side, but the Allies had also gained a new and powerful ally in the form of the United States of America. The majority of the globe was engaged in a battle for world domination.

Seeing the opportunity to exploit Soviet strategic paralysis, Hitler ordered a blitz attack on Moscow. As German units entered the capital, they came face-to-face with elite Siberian troops. In the ensuing battle the Siberians inflicted tremendous casualties on the attacking German forces, at a ratio of 9:1. Stalin was exuberant, now the chance for a counter-attack had come. In his own blitz attack on Moscow, the Red Army succeeded in destroying 3 units of the German army, with only a panzer cadre surviving but managing to withdraw. Moscow had been saved, but the Germans were not a beaten force.

February-March 1942

A period of quiet descended around Moscow as both sides had expended the majority of their efforts. Fighting continued on the fridges; with the Turkish army attacking across the the mountains, destroying a Soviet army. In the North Front, German units from Finland began to push forward, destroying armies and threatening to break through into the north.

Divisions and Armies on both sides were being reinforced as quickly as possible. The Soviet Union focused on expanding its command capacity. The Red Army was no longer on its last legs; but it was not yet strong enough to attack. Britain, in the Middle East, found itself lacking supplies to clear out Libya while simultaneously deal with Turkish and Iraqi participation. The entire map was on fire. Would anyone be extinguished in 1942?
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Steven Fuller
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Re: Part IV: Winter 41 (THE END)
UPDATE:

Since most of the Middle East was lost; we compared total PPS at the Production of April; and the Axis was exactly double the PP of the Allies. Due to mud; it was impossible to launch a counter-offensive to take back PP and the game was called (to the sadness of both players).

It was only the next day we realized we forgot to count basic production into the equation, which would have added a difference of 24 points to the Allies (oops! too much beer maybe).

Sad end.

The Lesson here is ALWAYS PUT A UNIT IN BASRA.

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Steve Hojnacki
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Amazing luck getting the '1' to get Iraq Uprising. Also when did Greece fall in your campaign I missed that in the report?
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Declan Breen
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Great write up and a great system, the game shines in campaign mode.
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Steven Fuller
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I'm not quite sure when Greece fell. It was a slog for the Germans. Naval invasion would have worked but instead they tried to advance along the main routes and that's always a long haul.
 
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