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Subject: Translation of Americanese rss

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Wendell
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This was amusing...

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David Molnar
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Except for teenagers, for whom the entire first column is replaced by "fine."
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J J
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Does that apply Americans in general, or just some group? Is this just another example of the Valley Girl, for example?
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Dallas Tucker
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My wife and I think it is fairly accurate, though it varies person to person. I don't know if it is limited to particular areas. My wife is from the west coast and I am from the east coast, and I also have family in the south and northeast.
 
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Adrian Hague
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So 'awesomely fine' would be an oxymoron?
 
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James Thompson
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I'm not sure we'd be allowed to post the Aussie version haha
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fightcitymayor
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JasonJ0 wrote:
Does that apply Americans in general, or just some group? Is this just another example of the Valley Girl, for example?
In general.
Even in the 21st century (where social media has done so much to degrade our language & dull our communication) there is still a large culture of propriety, where people are expected to "play nice" in public. Then after the other person leaves, or you get back to your car, then you say what you really think/feel.

I blame our collective British heritage for this particular strain of fake affability.
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Wendell
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JasonJ0 wrote:
Does that apply Americans in general, or just some group? Is this just another example of the Valley Girl, for example?


In general, I'd say. But it's also just meant to be a bit of fun; there's an element of truth to it but it's exaggerated here for humorous affect.
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¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
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I can add this one:

Texans

You = you
Y'all = you
All y'all = all of you

Also, from the comments:

Californians

No, yeah = yes
Yeah, no = no
No, yeah, forsure = 100% definitely

I suspect the Aussies have a version of that last one.

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Larry Haskell
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In New England, particularly Maine and New Hampshire the following g distinction is made:

turned around = “I took a wrong turn.”

turned around some = “I took a wrong turn and spent a couple hours finding my way back.”

some turned around = “I spent the night in the woods.”
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Edward Sexby
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wifwendell wrote:
JasonJ0 wrote:
Does that apply Americans in general, or just some group? Is this just another example of the Valley Girl, for example?


In general, I'd say. But it's also just meant to be a bit of fun; there's an element of truth to it but it's exaggerated here for humorous affect.


Argh! Now I have that Frank Zappa song in my head...

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J J
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Edward Sexby wrote:
Argh! Now I have that Frank Zappa song in my head...


Huh. I had no intention of doing a good deed today, but there you go, the strange quirks of fate...
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MABBY wrote:
I can add this one:

Texans

You = you
Y'all = you
All y'all = all of you

Also, from the comments:

Californians

No, yeah = yes
Yeah, no = no
No, yeah, forsure = 100% definitely

I suspect the Aussies have a version of that last one.



I've read a theory that suggests Australians crave affirmation. We have a long history of it. Possibly to do with convict stuff, or at least a need to prove ourselves given we are at the arse end of anywhere.

Anyway, the theory would explain "yeah, nah" etc. "Yeah, nah" means no. Literally it means "I understand you but I disagree/am answering negatively". The "Yeah" is politeness, deference. "Please don't hate me even though I'm about to disagree".

The same applies to the rising intonation at the end of statements. The same as a question, but not a question. The theory says it IS a question - it's like the person is asking, "do you accept my statement? Feel free to interject and disagree...."

Where it all falls down is that Californians do both these things.
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Cris Whetstone
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casualcasual wrote:
MABBY wrote:
I can add this one:

Texans

You = you
Y'all = you
All y'all = all of you

Also, from the comments:

Californians

No, yeah = yes
Yeah, no = no
No, yeah, forsure = 100% definitely

I suspect the Aussies have a version of that last one.



I've read a theory that suggests Australians crave affirmation. We have a long history of it. Possibly to do with convict stuff, or at least a need to prove ourselves given we are at the arse end of anywhere.

Anyway, the theory would explain "yeah, nah" etc. "Yeah, nah" means no. Literally it means "I understand you but I disagree/am answering negatively". The "Yeah" is politeness, deference. "Please don't hate me even though I'm about to disagree".

The same applies to the rising intonation at the end of statements. The same as a question, but not a question. The theory says it IS a question - it's like the person is asking, "do you accept my statement? Feel free to interject and disagree...."

Where it all falls down is that Californians do both these things.


While we do have our own special way of saying certain things here in CA, I can't really agree with your second statement about intonations. I don't hear widespread use of that rising end of statement usage here.

I know what you are saying and there are certain people that do do that. I get the feeling its a subset of a generation type of thing. Or maybe within certain wider spread communities related by online content in some way. Not sure but I don't feel like it's a Californian thing in the least.

The stuff in MABBY's post is completely true. I began using it without noticing some years ago in casual speech.


On the thread subject the most notable recent change in usage is for 'literally' of course which has now come to mean "there is something I want to emphasize that I want you to be surprised by".
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Scott Lewis
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JasonJ0 wrote:
Does that apply Americans in general, or just some group? Is this just another example of the Valley Girl, for example?

For Valley Girls, just add the word "Like" before each word on the left.

"Like, Fine", "Like, my friend", etc
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WetRock wrote:


While we do have our own special way of saying certain things here in CA, I can't really agree with your second statement about intonations. I don't hear widespread use of that rising end of statement usage here.

I know what you are saying and there are certain people that do do that. I get the feeling its a subset of a generation type of thing. Or maybe within certain wider spread communities related by online content in some way. Not sure but I don't feel like it's a Californian thing in the least.





Should point out that not all Australians do it and I'm aware it's not all Californians by any stretch. Not sure about the online content part though because I'm pretty sure I remember hearing it, like 20 years ago. Anyway, my point was more that while the theory is one resting it's weird that it happens in another context.
 
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James Thompson
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casualcasual wrote:
Should point out that not all Australians do it and I'm aware it's not all Californians by any stretch. Not sure about the online content part though because I'm pretty sure I remember hearing it, like 20 years ago. Anyway, my point was more that while the theory is one resting it's weird that it happens in another context.

Yeah nah, most of us do aye haha
 
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