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Subject: How do you measure hex-size? rss

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Pelle Nilsson
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When saying that a hexagon (in this case on a hex-grid map, although I guess it would be the same for hex-tiles) and you say that they are x mm (or y inches) in "size" is that the length between two opposing flat sides or is it the diameter (distance between two opposite corners)? I often read that a wargame map has a 1-inch grid for instance, and sometimes the size of hex-tiles are given for games.

I found this image in an old bgg thread (here) that illustrates the two different ways (ignoring the third way, measuring one of the six sides, since that seems very much less useful and I am pretty sure no one measure that way):



Looking at an old bug in my hexmap generator I suddenly become uncertain what behavior designers expect.

https://github.com/lifelike/hexmapextension/issues/1
 
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Pelle Nilsson
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Now that I think about it I could solve this by just giving the user the choice between all three ways of specifying it.
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Jeremy Lennert
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I'm not sure what's conventional in wargame measurements, but if it helps with your terminology, the orthogonal distance between two opposing sides is equal to twice the apothem.

(I don't know of a handy word for double-the-apothem, like diameter is double-the-radius.)

It's also equal to the center-to-center distance of two adjacent hexes.
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wayne mathias
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From side to far side of hex (or if you prefer, from center of hex to center of adjacent hex, which is the same distance).
(if you added the third set of lines those diamond shapes would become pairs of equilateral triangles - or they would if I had not placed them by hand instead of having a script generate them for mathematical precision)
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marc lecours
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The standard in gaming is the distance between opposing parallel sides.

This is also equal to the distance between the centers of two adjacent hexagons.
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Russ Williams
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I usually see it meaning the distance between opposite sides, rather than opposite corners.

(And I agree that the third interpretation (i.e. the length of one side) seems the least common.)
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James Clarke
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In engineering, the correct terminology for defining hexagon sizes is AF (Across Flats) or AC (Across Corners).

Thus in the example pictured above, one way of expressing the hexagon size is 79.224mm AF.
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Sight Reader
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I too have a hex size, but mine is a bigger and more powerful one than yours, and my hex size works.
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wayne mathias
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Really? Is this the place to bring up whose butt on the desk is bigger? (I keep my butt in my chair, but I have a small desk for my laptop).

Back to the main topic, center of hex to center of hex is the size measurement.
 
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James Clarke
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gxnpt wrote:
Back to the main topic, center of hex to center of hex is the size measurement.


Which is equivalent to the AF measurement.

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wayne mathias
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True. But since we are speaking of a uniform meshwork of hexes as opposed to an individual hex it is the measurement method that makes the most sense and the one used by gamers.

It is also the most useful positioning measurement for programming a mesh layout of hexes from a single hex image since you just use it and it/2 in the calculations.

Let's see, any more nits around here to pick at ................? Or did I get the last one just now? They do seem to be getting mighty small and hard to see now, even as nits go.

 
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Pelle Nilsson
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Thanks everyone! To my surprise everyone is in agreement, at least if we end the thread here, so no point in supporting the other interpretations. AF it is.
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James Campbell
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rubberchicken wrote:
The standard in gaming is the distance between opposing parallel sides.

This is also equal to the distance between the centers of two adjacent hexagons.


100% this. Measuring from corner to corner (or the length of one side) does not tend to work well. Manufacturers that I've contacted all use the distance between parallel sides (center to center) for hexes, just as they use for squares or rectangles.
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Derek H
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Highland Cow wrote:

In engineering, the correct terminology for defining hexagon sizes is AF (Across Flats) or AC (Across Corners).

Thus in the example pictured above, one way of expressing the hexagon size is 79.224mm AF.

Do you think the engineers would be upset if that terminology was extended to include AE (Across Edges) - so, in the example, above 45.74 AE.
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