Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Western Legends» Forums » General

Subject: What sort of player interaction is there? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
PK Levine
United States
Rossville
GA
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A lot of games that bill themselves as "sandbox" can feel like multiplayer solitaire, with everyone just off pursuing their own paths to victory points. Firefly is a good example; great game, but not a lot of interaction. It sounds like that isn't the case with Western Legends, but I'd like to know more.

Can someone tell me about how much of the following there is in the game, with specific examples?

1. Direct PVP (e.g., my character shoots yours and take their gold).

2. Take That (e.g., I play an event card and your character loses their gold).

3. Goal Denial (e.g., my character took the bounty you were going for).

4. Temporary co-op/truce (e.g., let's work together on this one goal and split the rewards, then go back to fighting each other).
13 
 Thumb up
0.13
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Burke (The Chubby Meeple)
United States
Noblesville
Indiana
flag msg tools
publisher
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pkitty wrote:
A lot of games that bill themselves as "sandbox" can feel like multiplayer solitaire, with everyone just off pursuing their own paths to victory points. Firefly is a good example; great game, but not a lot of interaction. It sounds like that isn't the case with Western Legends, but I'd like to know more.

Can someone tell me about how much of the following there is in the game, with specific examples?

1. Direct PVP (e.g., my character shoots yours and take their gold).

2. Take That (e.g., I play an event card and your character loses their gold).

3. Goal Denial (e.g., my character took the bounty you were going for).

4. Temporary co-op/truce (e.g., let's work together on this one goal and split the rewards, then go back to fighting each other).


Western Legends is very high in terms of player interaction. There is no feeling of multiple solo games happening simultaneously. There is quite a bit of direct PvP. You can fight other players in three different ways. You can duel them for Legendary Points (LP - the game’s victory points). You can rob them and steal gold or money from them. Or, if they are Wanted and you are a Marshal, you can arrest them. When arrested a Wanted player loses all of their Wanted points, half of their money, half of their gold, and any cattle they’d picked up. The Wanted players vs Marshal players is paramount to the game. If Marshal players don’t arrest the Wanted players, the Wanted players will run away with the score and end the game fairly quickly. Having players choose to be on one side of the law or the other (and being able to change sides as the game progresses) creates a natural tension and a necessity for PvP. The arresting Wanted players is also the core of the Take That of the game. Because the players can change sides throughout the game, it’s entirely possible - and likely - that temporary alliances will form. And, while there’s no Goal Denial in the terms you mentioned, a Wanted player getting arrested can have a difficult time obtaining goals. Playing Wanted is a very high-risk, high-reward strategy.
14 
 Thumb up
0.30
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Travis R. Chance
United States
Fishers
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This game is SO interactive. That's the standout element in this as opposed to many of its peers in the genre that are more so pick-up-and-deliver games with some other options in the mix.

To answer your inquiries:

1. Direct PVP (e.g., my character shoots yours and take their gold).

There's poker, there's three different type of fights: duel, rob, arrest. There's story cards that function like public objectives in a way.

2. Take That (e.g., I play an event card and your character loses their gold).

I would not say "take that" as the game is more thoughtful than that. You can rob another player, stealing half their gold or money. You can bust a whiskey bottle over someone's head. You can snake bandits from people. Lots of little tricky card bonuses that create that "you sonuva..." moments. A few characters are more antagonistic--like Billy, who steals a card or $10 from a player when he ends his movement in a space with other players. Annie Oakley makes players choose to discard a card or take a wound at the beginning of a fight. There's a poker card called Wallop where you punch someone, give em a wound, and then get to see what's in their hand after--great tool for fighting right after.

3. Goal Denial (e.g., my character took the bounty you were going for).

Players have personal goals, wherein you can't knowingly deny, but the story cards are half event cards/half public objectives. There is absolutely ways to interfere with plans. For example, rob someone en route to deposit gold or the cabaret. Wanted players can take out bandits to deny marshals of Marshal points.

4. Temporary co-op/truce (e.g., let's work together on this one goal and split the rewards, then go back to fighting each other).

This is one of my favorite aspects of the game. Wanted players set the pace of the game, so naturally they have a target on their back. Marshals have fewer ways to move up their track, but arresting a Wanted player is a great way to stop their scoring AND get your own.

But it's more than just good guys vs bad guys. Marshals have to compete to get bandits from each other AND Wanted players. The MOST Wanted player at the end of the game scores 3VP, while the rest only get 1. There's a subtle manipulation of the Sheriff by all sides. Wanted players can move the Sheriff toward another outlaw to secure being most Wanted. Marshal players can deny another Marshal the option to make an arrest.

I agree that this term is often misleading, but I truly believe this game lives up to the moniker. You have like 18 options on your turn, and within those there are branching decisions. It's really pretty impressive.
18 
 Thumb up
0.35
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
PK Levine
United States
Rossville
GA
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the very informative replies! To be clear, I wasn't trying to imply that a good game needs all four of those things (heck, some of my favorite games have none of them), but I just wanted to know how things broke down in terms of those categories. I'm really looking forward to this Kickstarter and I've already subscribed to the Facebook Event page so I'll be reminded when it kicks off.
9 
 Thumb up
0.07
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Travis R. Chance
United States
Fishers
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pkitty wrote:
Thanks for the very informative replies! To be clear, I wasn't trying to imply that a good game needs all four of those things (heck, some of my favorite games have none of them), but I just wanted to know how things broke down in terms of those categories. I'm really looking forward to this Kickstarter and I've already subscribed to the Facebook Event page so I'll be reminded when it kicks off.


Didn't take that way at all! Very happy to answer any questions you have. I totally agree: games can be painted as something that is not necessarily accurate. I never even though of Firefly as sandbox, but after you mentioned it I could see someone saying so. In my mind there is Xia, there is Merchants and Marauders, and there is Western Legends.
7 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Koff
United States
Wilmington
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
Check out my "What's Next?" blog.
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Kolossal wrote:
For example, rob someone en route to deposit gold or the cabaret.

You're not really going to use the word "cabaret" in the game are you? In the Wild West it's called a saloon.
5 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Travis R. Chance
United States
Fishers
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We have both. And cabaret was used in the era—huge time for immigration in the US, wherein cultures were mixing and shaping the time.

The saloon is for gambling in the game. The cabaret is where you spend money for points.
5 
 Thumb up
0.30
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben Phelan
United States
Lake Waukomis
Missouri
flag msg tools
You should definitely do watch the How to Play video on this. It will show you exactly what you want to know.
7 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Burke (The Chubby Meeple)
United States
Noblesville
Indiana
flag msg tools
publisher
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The How to Play video can be found here:

https://boardgamegeek.com/video/162281
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Koff
United States
Wilmington
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
Check out my "What's Next?" blog.
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Kolossal wrote:
We have both. And cabaret was used in the era—huge time for immigration in the US, wherein cultures were mixing and shaping the time.

The saloon is for gambling in the game. The cabaret is where you spend money for points.

Got it, thanks. The game looks like a winner, good luck with the KS campaign.
6 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Travis R. Chance
United States
Fishers
Indiana
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Not a problem! I had the same reaction when I first received the game. But, through our extensive research, it proved to be correct. Thanks for commenting!
5 
 Thumb up
0.27
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.