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Subject: Everything Board Games Tiny Epic Quest Review rss

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Dane Trimble
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Payson
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Quick Look:
Designer: Scott Almes
Artists: Miguel Coimbra, Adam P. McIver, Benjamin Shulman
Publisher: Gamelyn Games
Year Published: 2017
No. of Players: 1-4
Ages: 14+
Playing Time: 30-60 minutes




Review:
Rules and Setup:

Each player sets up their player board by placing the max health marker above the 6 and the health marker on the 6. Place the max power marker at 3, and the power token on 3. Place 1 sword, 1 shield, and 1 staff on the left space indicated. Place the adventure card nearby. The magic board and round marker will be placed nearby with the tokens at their starting position.

Create the land map by placing non-castle cards in a cross pattern, adding the castle cards to the corners and then placing the remaining cards around the board as indicated in the rulebook. Green goblin tokens will be placed on each goblin spot with diamonds facing each other. Place three of your colored hero meeples on your castle color on the board. Place the item rack with treasure items on it and the dice nearby.




Starting in the Day phase, the first player will choose a type of movement and perform the action they moved to, and each player will perform the same movement. The actions include the following:
Fight a Goblin – Doing so will help you gain points according to the scoring chart and will help move your max health marker further.
Complete a Temple – Can move legendary items along their track or can be done to complete a quest.
Learn a Spell – This will help gain points on the scoring chart and will move the max power marker further on the track.
Visit a Mushroom Grotto – You will perform the action it reads.
Visit Castles – Allows you to gain a health or power. .
The First Player token is passed and a different movement is chosen. This will occur until four movements have been made.



During the Night phase, you can choose to adventure, roll the dice, and possibly get wounded or killed, or you can choose to rest and gather your finished quests. You will only be able to claim a temple when you get to the last step, only learn magic if the spell track is on the level needed, and only defeat a goblin if you get the red skull.

When rolling dice, you can be attacked by goblins, gain power, conjure magic, advance in a temple, or attack a goblin. If you die during the night, you will not complete any temples, defeat any goblins, or gain spells, so make sure you rest before a goblin finishes you off.

The game is played over five rounds. Points are scored by goblins defeated, quests completed, spells learned, and legendary items received.



Theme and Mechanics:
The gist of the story is that you need to go on an epic quest to kill goblins that are pouring into the mushroom grottos. You can help save the Mushroom Realm by defeating those goblins, learning ancient spells, raiding temples, and acquiring powerful items to complete quests. Mechanics include area movement (which feels a little like worker placement). During the Night phase, the game uses dice-rolling and press-your-luck mechanics, as well. The game is modular and plays differently every time. The mechanic of area movement by picking a type of movement pairs well with the theme of going on quests and saving the Mushroom Realm.








Artwork and Components:
The artwork looks very professional and helps to create an epic story with all its different areas to complete quests and explore. Gamelyn went all out on the components. The meeples are designed to actually hold the different magical items. The items fit well in their hands and don’t fall out. The item rack is made of cardboard, and after so many plays, the holes become bigger and the items don't stay on the rack as well with time. The box is very thick and can be used to roll dice in. I feel like even though the game is small in size, they really used the best components to bring the game to life. It feels like a board game and a toy put together.



The Good:
The game is modular and can change each time you play.
Those ITEMeeples are just amazing, and I’m sure we will see more of these in future games.
All the movement cards can be played strategically to move one of your heroes to a place you want to be at while restricting the movement of your opponents.
The idea of being able to get hurt while adventuring until you rest makes logical sense, but it also adds press-your-luck elements to the game.
There are several paths to victory.
The idea of having the magic track make adventuring harder as you keep adventuring is a great element to place a timer on the Night phase.

The Bad:
Once you play through a handful of games, the map becomes very well-known and similar throughout play, even though the cards are actually placed differently each time.
With only three quests being out at a time, when one is completed, a new one will appear and anyone can get lucky to be close to fulfilling that quest.

Final Thoughts:
I am not sure how I have never played a Tiny Epic game until now. This is the smallest box game that gives the biggest punch as far as gameplay is concerned. You might think the game will take 10-20 minutes to play, but really with all the complexity, it could take over an hour to play. After playing, the game just makes sense, and it’s easy to follow. I know it’s still the beginning of 2018, but for me, this is now my #1 game I’ve played in 2018. The game is tiny, but it is so epic, and I'm excited to see what they do next. I'm especially excited to see what's next for the ITEMeeples, because those are just so awesome and will need to be used and expanded on with future games.

Players Who Like:
This game would be recommended to those who like a Zelda-type theme.




I am giving Tiny Epic Quest 8 out of 10 super meeples.

See more reviews from Brody and EBG at http://www.everythingboardgames.com/p/reviews.html
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Rainer Fuchs
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Unfortunately, this game has fallen flat with everyone I played it with so far. Mostly -- and while I like the game I sympathize with this complaint -- while the artwork is visually appealing it makes it really hard to find anything on the board. The icons for the different spells are very similar, the temples are very similar, etc. In each game we spent endless amounts of wasted time locating stuff, and I could see how everyone was increasingly getting frustrated. Even after four or five games, it didn't seem to get much easier. Not hard to see how the artwork could be cleaned up to be perhaps less psychedelic but more readable. I'm sure for others that's not much of a problem because they are more apt at pattern recognition but I doubt TEQ will find a lot of playtime in my group for a reason that alas has nothing to do with the mechanics of the game.
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Mike Qunell
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The ITEMeeples are already being put to use again in Tiny Epic Zombies which is currently on Kickstarter. This time they are holding a lot of different weapons!
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Laszlo Korossy
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I love the Itemeeples. If they had been a gimmick, they would have been a great one; as implemented, however, it's hard to imagine the game without them -- it would be bogged down by character sheets or tokens or something worse. A great marriage of theme and mechanics!

My one hope is that they don't end up losing their traction with the items in the same way the rack did. The very first thing I did, by the way, after opening the box and admiring the contents, was to toss the rack.

mix579 wrote:
While the artwork is visually appealing it makes it really hard to find anything on the board. The icons for the different spells are very similar, the temples are very similar, etc. In each game we spent endless amounts of wasted time locating stuff, and I could see how everyone was increasingly getting frustrated.


What an interesting criticism! Only one review I read mentioned this, but that was only after one game. We enjoyed looking over the land map, taking it all in, planning out moves as if on a real and very intricate map. After the first game, we had most of it down. That review suggested that the art be simplified, which I think would be disastrous -- it would strike at the heart of the game's thematic immersion. However, if this IS an issue for certain players, I can imagine it being a very frustrating one, hurting their play experience in the same way that simplifying the art would hurt mine.
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Matthew Gabbert
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While player count didn't seem to make a huge difference during the Day phase, I greatly preferred the Night phase with two players over four. In fact, I don't know if I'd ever play it again with four.

The "board" is a little busy, but not too bad, but having so many tiny, light markers on the thin player boards can be a bit annoying. Just touching one often makes all the others shift out of place.
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Steve Wrenn
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What? You thought I'd have some interesting overtext?
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I do have to agree that the board can be very busy and it takes time to find stuff. While I still have the game and love it, that's not a baseless claim.

The item rack I never use, and the only reason I haven't thrown it away is in case I ever decide to get rid of it, it's still "complete."

Calling it "Zelda" lol, yup! I'm surprised Nintendo didn't sue them. They pushed back on that, but I say "they doth protest too much." As others have said, if you don't want it perceived as Zelda, then don't take ALL their iconography! I've never played the Zelda games, so I don't know every little detail, but I know enough, and I realize they did it!
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Brody Sheard
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Thanks for the comments thus far. If you toss your rack, what to you do with all the items? Do you just put them in a bag or something?
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Steve Wrenn
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What? You thought I'd have some interesting overtext?
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Yup. Didn't toss it, still keep it in the box, but it's too much time to put all the pieces on it, and as one person said, repeated use will loosen them in the holes, and I don't feel like having them drop out and onto the floor, especially away from home. I also doubt you'd be able to fully close the box with the pieces all in the rack.
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David Molina
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At first it can be hard to find things. After a few plays it got amazingly simple as far as I can tell. I end up playing this at least once a week, I try to get in about 2 games if I can. I have no problems finding stuff. Just need to look at the temples. Like the Spider spell (level 3) has the webs on it. The Lion is on the Lava temple. I feel like there is so much more go this game than a few plays will reveal. Once you get into the nuances the game really shines. This is easily my favorite TE game with Galaxies following right behind it. The setup can be kinda slow until you get use to it. I think it takes me about 3-4 minutes to set up a game now, its pretty fast as far as I'm concerned.
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Dane Trimble
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I don't keep them on the rack either. I use a bag.
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Laszlo Korossy
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I bagged the items in one bag together with the magic track marker and turn track marker, then bagged all the goblins together with the active player token. Those bags get opened every game. Then, I bagged each set of itemeeples separately and included in each bag a set of HP/energy markers, max HP/max energy markers, the appropriate spell track marker, and a set of the three legendary items. I can then open only as many players' baggies as I need for each session.

I bagged all the cards together and left the land map tiles and dice loose.
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Steve Wrenn
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What? You thought I'd have some interesting overtext?
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I tried separating it by player set (meeple, card, sword, etc), but found they wouldn't fit in the box that way.
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David Molina
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I made boxes for everything in mine. Lid rests slightly above the rim but it works for me!








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Laszlo Korossy
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KingJackalope wrote:
I made boxes for everything in mine.


WOW.

I know I shouldn't be impressed anymore by how crafty everyone seems to be on BGG, but... just, WOW.
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David Molina
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I like making paper boxes! lol my TEG boxes I’m particularly proud of too!
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Laszlo Korossy
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I saw someone who made a tiny box to hold UTEK cubes and still fit it into the ultra-tiny box. I wish I had tkat skill.
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Jack Bradbury
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Have people seen this?

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2520529
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