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Subject: A bunch of questions rss

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Christian Heckmann
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Hi, played my first game of Zimby Mojo tonight and it garnered... let's say "mixed" results. I could see quite a bit of potential, but some pretty slow players managed to drag the game down pretty badly. There were also quite a few rules uncertainties and while I think that the first problem could be aleviated by getting better acquainted with the game (or not playing it with such slowpokes ), the rules-problems remain. So here's everything that was unclear:

- Single tribe columns... Can they be broken up? Can single zimbies leave a column and join another one? There are some sentences in the rules that suggest that single tribe columns can not be broken up, but they are rather ambiguous. So can I move single zimbies out of a column?

- While we're at it, can zombies form a column? We had a situation where two zombies would have landed on the same space after shambling.

- The rulebook talks about one tribe joining another tribe's (or multiple tribes') column, but what if a multi-tribe-column wants to join with a single tribe column? Who has to give their consent to that?

- What happens if a multi tribe column tries to enter a tribal board? Do the zimbies of the player who may enter said board leave the column and the rest of the column stays right in front of the tribal boards entrance? Not sure something like that would ever happen, but the question came up.

- What exactly does ownership of an item do in a multi tribe column? We ruled that only whoever owned an item could leave a column and bring that item along, but I couldn't find anything explanatory about that in the rules.

- The flow of combat kind of eludes me. I kind of get the concept of the stack (as I should, since I am studying computer science ), but I can't really make sense about how it works in practice. We had multiple situations where timing of effects turned into a real problem. I think I get that witcheries and rituals can be used as interrupts at any time and there should be common courtesy about letting people do something retrospectively, but in additon to that... It's perhaps easiest for me to visualize my problems with a few examples from our game.
The first one was combat between two columns of zimbies. The attacker declared combat, the defender used a witchery to eliminate all of the attacker's zimbies. Is combat cancelled? Should dice have been rolled the instant that combat was declared and the witchery should have happened afterwards? How exactly should such a situation play out? Even if dice had been rolled, what happens if one column eliminates all opponents after dice have been rolled but still loses the combat (because they rolled a 1 or so and the opponent rolled a 6, so the opponent still beats them even without added strength from zimbies)?
Also is cannibalizing pushed onto the stack? There was another situation where one player attacked another, cannibalized a zimby and then a witchery was played that moved the attacking column out of combat range. Does the zimby still get cannibalized? Is combat conducted? Or is everything cancelled outright?
There was another situation where a battle ended in a draw and a player played a witchery that allowed him to hurt his opponent if they were tied for combat strength. What if the other player had afterwards put a ritual or witchery on the stack that would have given him additional brutality? Would the other witchery have been rendered useless, since there wouldn't be a tie for power anymore once it'd be resolved?

- Also how does killing thugs really work? The rules say that a killed thug is expelled to a barracks tile and later enters through a random portal again. So if you kill a thug, you put him on a barracks tile and flip him face down, right? Then during the first phase of the next round, he's turned face up again. Then during the next thug phase, he teleports to a random portal? Does he also move or is that his movement for the turn? And does a face up thug on a barracks tile count as "in play" and therefore raises the brutality of the cannibal king?

- The cannibal king doesn't attack columns that are just standing around in his inner sanctum, does he?

- Also attacking doesn't cost mojo, does it? Yet it is called an "aggressive push" in the rules and if you win a combat, you move into the enemy column's space, right?

- There was a witchery that referred to "non tile spaces" or somesuch (I forgot the exact wording, I didn't have that one in hand). What exactly does that mean? That you can move through spaces without tiles?

- The rules say that you can cannibalize zimbies out of turn. What if you're part of a multi tribe column that gets attacked? Can you cannibalize a zimby to increase the column's brutality? Can you only do so if you're the biggest tribe in the column?

- Concerning the potent shamans variant... So a mojo token provides two points of mojo if flipped. Can you split those two points or preserve one of those or something like that? We had two different situations where this turned out to be pretty vital and we ruled differently on both of those. The first one was one player playing a one mojo ritual out of turn during a combat where she was defending. She used a mojo token for that, so she overpayed. After that battle, she wanted to play another one mojo ritual in reaction to something else, but we ruled that since it wasn't her turn and both "actions" weren't directly connected to one another, she had forfeited the second point of mojo. Afterwards, another player during his turn entered combat, used a mojo token to cast a one mojo ritual and after winning the combat wanted to use the second point of mojo provided by that token to move the column that had just won the combat. We ruled this as legal, since those were two consecutive actions during that player's active turn. Was that rule-conformal?

- Teleportation was a bit problematic, too. So whatever walks onto a portal is immediately teleported? Are zombies who shamble onto a portal teleported? Thugs? Are zombies and thugs killed if they stand on a portal and a player teleports a column of zimbies from his tribal board onto that portal?

- Also how many zimbies can you teleport with a single mojo? Can you form a column of three zimbies on your tribal board and teleport that column for a single point of mojo?

Those are all of the questions I can think of right now. Looking forward quite a bit to the answers
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Jim Felli
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First and foremost, thank you for taking the time to play Zimby Mojo. As the designer, I cannot thank you enough for trying my game. Now, I'll do my best to answer your questions!

Harblnger wrote:
Single tribe columns... Can they be broken up? Can single zimbies leave a column and join another one? There are some sentences in the rules that suggest that single tribe columns can not be broken up, but they are rather ambiguous. So can I move single zimbies out of a column?


Yes. Suppose you have a multi-tribe column with 3 of your zimbies in it... you can move one by itself, a column of 2, or a column of 3. The zimbies you move are treated as normal creatures on that tile and move as you choose based on the mojo you use. So, you could pay a mojo and move a column of 2 of your zimbies out of the column and 4 tiles away, thereby leaving 1 zimby in the original column so that you control that column on your turn.

Harblnger wrote:
While we're at it, can zombies form a column? We had a situation where two zombies would have landed on the same space after shambling.


No. It specifically states in the rule book that zombies cannot form columns.

Harblnger wrote:
The rulebook talks about one tribe joining another tribe's (or multiple tribes') column, but what if a multi-tribe-column wants to join with a single tribe column? Who has to give their consent to that?


All the tribes involved must give consent. If tribe A and B are in a column and meet a single column of tribe C and want to join together, then A and B must both give their consent to let C join them and C must give their consent to join.

Harblnger wrote:
What happens if a multi tribe column tries to enter a tribal board? Do the zimbies of the player who may enter said board leave the column and the rest of the column stays right in front of the tribal boards entrance? Not sure something like that would ever happen, but the question came up.


Can't happen. Only zimbies of tribe A may enter tribe A's tribal board. They would have to leave the rest of the column on the main board.

Harblnger wrote:
What exactly does ownership of an item do in a multi tribe column? We ruled that only whoever owned an item could leave a column and bring that item along, but I couldn't find anything explanatory about that in the rules.


Whichever tribe holds the item may leave with the item. If tribe A holds the item and there are 3 zimbies of tribe A, then player A has control of the item and can give it to 1 zimby, or a column of 2 zimbies, or a column of 3 zimbies and have them run away with it.

Harblnger wrote:
The attacker declared combat, the defender used a witchery to eliminate all of the attacker's zimbies. Is combat cancelled? Should dice have been rolled the instant that combat was declared and the witchery should have happened afterwards? How exactly should such a situation play out?


The declaration of combat is made and the witchery goes on the stack. If another witchery is not placed on top of it, the witchery resolves and all the attacker's zimbies are eliminated. Combat is over, as there are not two (or more) combatants. On the other hand, if combat rolls are made before the witchery is cast, then the combat rolls go on the stack and will resolve regardless of whether or not one combatant has been removed from the fray.

Harblnger wrote:
Even if dice had been rolled, what happens if one column eliminates all opponents after dice have been rolled but still loses the combat (because they rolled a 1 or so and the opponent rolled a 6, so the opponent still beats them even without added strength from zimbies)?


Combat rolls go on the stack. So, if tribe A rolls a 6 and tribe B rolls a 1, then 5 wounds are going onto tribe B... unless a witchery is placed on the stack after combat rolls are made and before they resolve. So, if combat rolls are made and tribe B unsummons tribe itself before the rolls are resolved, then there is no tribe B there to take the wounds when the combat rolls resolve. If combat rolls are made and tribe A is unsummoned, then tribe B is still there when wounds resolve and takes the 5 wounds.

Harblnger wrote:
Also is cannibalizing pushed onto the stack? There was another situation where one player attacked another, cannibalized a zimby and then a witchery was played that moved the attacking column out of combat range. Does the zimby still get cannibalized? Is combat conducted? Or is everything cancelled outright?


It states in the rules that cannibalism must be performed prior to the attack. So, yes, the cannibalism takes place. Now, if combat rolls have been made and then a witchery is pushed onto the stack before those rolls resolve that moves a combatant out of combat range, then there is no combatant there to receive or deliver the wounds consequent to combat.

Harblnger wrote:
There was another situation where a battle ended in a draw and a player played a witchery that allowed him to hurt his opponent if they were tied for combat strength. What if the other player had afterwards put a ritual or witchery on the stack that would have given him additional brutality? Would the other witchery have been rendered useless, since there wouldn't be a tie for power anymore once it'd be resolved?


Say you have a draw -- equal combat rolls. Suppose player A uses Blow Guns to do a wound to player B's zimby and kills it. In response, player B uses Jagged Cleavers to give that zimby +2 brutality. The resolution of the stack is: 1) player B's zimby gets +2 brutality, 2) player A's Blow Guns kills player B's zimby, 3) combat rolls are resolved with player B's zimby getting +2 brutality (and possibly killing player A's zimby).

Harblnger wrote:
Also how does killing thugs really work? The rules say that a killed thug is expelled to a barracks tile and later enters through a random portal again. So if you kill a thug, you put him on a barracks tile and flip him face down, right?


Right. It is now out of play.

Harblnger wrote:
Then during the first phase of the next round, he's turned face up again. Then during the next thug phase, he teleports to a random portal? Does he also move or is that his movement for the turn?


Yes, he moves. He enters the main board at the portal and moves immediately.

Harblnger wrote:
And does a face up thug on a barracks tile count as "in play" and therefore raises the brutality of the cannibal king?


No. The thug must be on the main board to count as "in play."

Harblnger wrote:
The cannibal king doesn't attack columns that are just standing around in his inner sanctum, does he?


No.

Harblnger wrote:
Also attacking doesn't cost mojo, does it? Yet it is called an "aggressive push" in the rules and if you win a combat, you move into the enemy column's space, right?


Correct. Attacking does not cost mojo. If the attacking creature wins the combat, it must enter the tile occupied by the defeated creature as part of combat resolution.

Harblnger wrote:
There was a witchery that referred to "non tile spaces" or somesuch (I forgot the exact wording, I didn't have that one in hand). What exactly does that mean? That you can move through spaces without tiles?


I suspect that you are referring to "Go All Ghosty" which lets you move through walls. Those would be the "non-tile spaces" as they are not tiles into which creatures may normally move.

Harblnger wrote:
The rules say that you can cannibalize zimbies out of turn. What if you're part of a multi tribe column that gets attacked? Can you cannibalize a zimby to increase the column's brutality? Can you only do so if you're the biggest tribe in the column?


Neither. Is specifically states in the rules that only single-tribe columns may engage in cannibalism.

Harblnger wrote:
Concerning the potent shamans variant... So a mojo token provides two points of mojo if flipped. Can you split those two points or preserve one of those or something like that? We had two different situations where this turned out to be pretty vital and we ruled differently on both of those. The first one was one player playing a one mojo ritual out of turn during a combat where she was defending. She used a mojo token for that, so she overpayed. After that battle, she wanted to play another one mojo ritual in reaction to something else, but we ruled that since it wasn't her turn and both "actions" weren't directly connected to one another, she had forfeited the second point of mojo. Afterwards, another player during his turn entered combat, used a mojo token to cast a one mojo ritual and after winning the combat wanted to use the second point of mojo provided by that token to move the column that had just won the combat. We ruled this as legal, since those were two consecutive actions during that player's active turn. Was that rule-conformal?


I typically leave this to House Rules. Our House Rule is that both mojo must be part of the same stack.

Harblnger wrote:
Teleportation was a bit problematic, too. So whatever walks onto a portal is immediately teleported? Are zombies who shamble onto a portal teleported?


Yes.

Harblnger wrote:
Thugs?


Yes.

Harblnger wrote:
Are zombies and thugs killed if they stand on a portal and a player teleports a column of zimbies from his tribal board onto that portal?


Zombies are killed (as their "home board" is the Far Shore); thugs are sent face-down to barracks tiles.

Harblnger wrote:
Also how many zimbies can you teleport with a single mojo? Can you form a column of three zimbies on your tribal board and teleport that column for a single point of mojo?


Yes. You can teleport a single creature for 1 mojo and a legal column is a single creature. So, you could send out a column of 1, 2, or 3 zimbies. In fact, you use 1 mojo to send out a column of 2 zimbies and then use another 2 mojo to send each of those zimbies off 4 tiles in different directions

Harblnger wrote:
Those are all of the questions I can think of right now. Looking forward quite a bit to the answers


Thank you so much for the questions! I hope that these answers have helped you and that you will give Zimby Mojo another go!
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Christian Heckmann
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Thanks Jim, that clarifies a few things Sorry for asking those questions that are already answered in the rules themselves, the formatting of the rules just went a bit over my head in general
Quote:
No. It specifically states in the rule book that zombies cannot form columns.

So in that case, the second zombie would just shamble one less space but still move in the same direction?
Quote:
The declaration of combat is made and the witchery goes on the stack. If another witchery is not placed on top of it, the witchery resolves and all the attacker's zimbies are eliminated. Combat is over, as there are not two (or more) combatants. On the other hand, if combat rolls are made before the witchery is cast, then the combat rolls go on the stack and will resolve regardless of whether or not one combatant has been removed from the fray.

...

Combat rolls go on the stack. So, if tribe A rolls a 6 and tribe B rolls a 1, then 5 wounds are going onto tribe B... unless a witchery is placed on the stack after combat rolls are made and before they resolve. So, if combat rolls are made and tribe B unsummons tribe itself before the rolls are resolved, then there is no tribe B there to take the wounds when the combat rolls resolve. If combat rolls are made and tribe A is unsummoned, then tribe B is still there when wounds resolve and takes the 5 wounds.

...

It states in the rules that cannibalism must be performed prior to the attack. So, yes, the cannibalism takes place. Now, if combat rolls have been made and then a witchery is pushed onto the stack before those rolls resolve that moves a combatant out of combat range, then there is no combatant there to receive or deliver the wounds consequent to combat.

...

Say you have a draw -- equal combat rolls. Suppose player A uses Blow Guns to do a wound to player B's zimby and kills it. In response, player B uses Jagged Cleavers to give that zimby +2 brutality. The resolution of the stack is: 1) player B's zimby gets +2 brutality, 2) player A's Blow Guns kills player B's zimby, 3) combat rolls are resolved with player B's zimby getting +2 brutality (and possibly killing player A's zimby).

Those answers irritate me even further So combat is cancelled if one combatant moves away before everything resolves but is not cancelled if one combatant is eliminated beforehand if dice have already been rolled? Also a brutality-enhancing witchery or ritual still works even after the zimby benefitting from it has been removed? So if a zimby with one brutality that has been given two more points of brutality through witchery is removed from combat before it resolves, how many points of brutality does he add to the roll? None? Two? Three? I'm confused
Quote:
I suspect that you are referring to "Go All Ghosty" which lets you move through walls. Those would be the "non-tile spaces" as they are not tiles into which creatures may normally move.

Do you have to pay movement points for the non-existant spaces you would move through or can you just move from one side of a wall to the other side by paying a single movement point?

Thanks for clarifying anyway and thanks for your further answers in advance whistle
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Jim Felli
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Harblnger wrote:
Quote:
No. It specifically states in the rule book that zombies cannot form columns.

So in that case, the second zombie would just shamble one less space but still move in the same direction?


Yes, unless the zombie was from another tribe, in which case it would attack. (I've heard some folks have House Ruled that a zombie will only attack living creatures during its shamble phase but a shaman can force their zombie to attack another tribe's zombie on their turn, which is thematically pretty neat.)


Harblnger wrote:
So combat is cancelled if one combatant moves away before everything resolves but is not cancelled if one combatant is eliminated beforehand if dice have already been rolled? Also a brutality-enhancing witchery or ritual still works even after the zimby benefitting from it has been removed? So if a zimby with one brutality that has been given two more points of brutality through witchery is removed from combat before it resolves, how many points of brutality does he add to the roll? None? Two? Three? I'm confused


I apologize for the confusion: I should have been more clear. Wounds are unavoidable once they have been assigned on the stack (but may still be preventable). The order of events and four possible scroll stacks during combat will look something like this:

[A. Pre-combat scroll use]
PAUSE, start combat
Combat Rolls are made
[B. witcheries may be cast]
[B. any witcheries cast resolve on the stack]
Combat Rolls resolve
Wounds are calculated (who should take how many)
[C. witcheries may be cast]
[C. any witcheries cast resolve on the stack]
Wounds are assigned (who will take how many)
[D. witcheries may be cast]
[D. any witcheries cast resolve on the stack]
Wounds are delivered

Players have the option of creating stacks of witcheries at A, B, C, D. Witcheries that affect combat rolls or brutality that take place during B will resolve before the combat rolls resolve and therefore affect the targeted creature's combat roll. So, if a +2 brutality witchery is cast in the B stack, that creature will get a +2 to their combat roll. Combat rolls allow you to see how those rolls will resolve without witchery interference. Combat rolls resolve into the final, modified rolls that yield the wounds. Think in D&D terms: your To Hit roll might be 14 (combat roll) but then you add your +2 for strength and your +1 for your weapon and your actual To Hit roll is 14+2+1=17 (combat roll resolves).

Any witcheries that remove a combatant from harm's way prior to wounds being assigned (C stack) saves that combatant from being assigned those wounds (and, therefore, from taking them). Any combatant removed from harm's way after being assigned wounds but prior to taking (D stack) is still going to take wounds unless those wounds are somehow prevented from landing (e.g., Lil' Bits o' Armor). That's why the scroll cards use the term "prevent" when talking about incoming wounds.

Harblnger wrote:
Do you have to pay movement points for the non-existant spaces you would move through or can you just move from one side of a wall to the other side by paying a single movement point?


Yes. You use mojo to impel your zimbies to move, regardless of whether that movement is through air or walls (e.g., using "Go All Ghosty"). When moving while "ghosty," pay for your movement (e.g., 4 tiles) and count "non-tile spaces" as tiles of movement when you move through them (each section of about the same size as a normal movement tile would count as a tile for movement purposes). You must pay mojo to move your zimbies, they simply have the ability to walk through walls, doors, and impassable areas.

I hope you find these answers a bit more useful.
 
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Christian Heckmann
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Yeah, that helps, although I'm still not a hundred percent clear about when a combat might be cancelled altogether... Here's how I understand it now, based on your sequence:

If at point A witcheries or rituals cause one column to be obliterated or moved out of combat range, combat is cancelled altogether.

If at point B witcheries or rituals cause one column to be obliterated or moved out of combat range, the number rolled still counts but no brutality is added to it?

If at point C or D yada yada yada, the loser still gets dealt the wounds, even if he destoryed the other column via witchery,

Especially the second case is still unclear to me. Apart from that, is that about right?
 
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Harblnger wrote:
If at point A witcheries or rituals cause one column to be obliterated or moved out of combat range, combat is cancelled altogether.


Correct. There are no longer two parties to exchange blows.

Harblnger wrote:
If at point B witcheries or rituals cause one column to be obliterated or moved out of combat range, the number rolled still counts but no brutality is added to it?


The combat rolls were made prior to the stack forming in response to the combat rolls, so brutality is still added based on column composition (e.g., +2 brutality for a single-tribe zimby column of size 2). However, if a creature is moved before the combat rolls are resolved, it is no longer there to be assigned wounds and will therefore take none. Any wounds it delivered via its combat roll, however, are still assignable to the remaining combatant.

Harblnger wrote:
If at point C or D yada yada yada, the loser still gets dealt the wounds, even if he destoryed the other column via witchery


Correct. As long as the creature sustaining the wounds is there when wounds are assigned and the wounds are assigned to them, they take the the wounds (unless they use a scroll to mitigate them).
 
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Okay, so brutality is added at the same time the die is rolled? So even if I kill opposing zimbies after the roll, nothing changes about the opponents combat score? And if a column is moved (or destroyed) before combat resolution it can inflict wounds but can't suffer wounds (so mutual destruction is possible)? Got it, that helps a lot.
 
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