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Mythic Battles: Pantheon» Forums » Variants

Subject: RPG Mythic battles rss

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mak logan
Greece
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I really like the core game and the miniatures. I am thinking about obtaining the rpg pdf. I cannot find much information for the rpg book. Except from some vague opinions, there is nothing that can make me understand how it is played.
1. So can the owners of rpg book share their thoughts, how it is played, can it be played solo?
2. The set up of a game?
3. Is there a need for pen and paper?
4. There is need for maps?
5. I don' t have experience with roleplaying, so there is a need for gamemaster?
Thanks to everyone who can post useful informations
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Samuel Delerme
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Hello
I bought the RPG and played it with my daughter.

1) It is a surprisingly fine RPG if your main objective is to play and experience epic adventures.
I think it is on the "easy to learn" side of RPG but, generally, RPGs are much, much easier to learn by participating in a session with a game master. But I think you can learn how to play just byreading the book and watching any RPG session on youtube.
It cannot be played solo, you need at leeast a gamemaster and one player (but, unlike a lot of RPGs, it is just fine with just one player)

2) by the set up, if you mean the background, it is the same as the boardgame, an epic ancient Greece where heroes and monster are loose (you can even play one of the heroes).

3) yes, you do need both, since you have a character sheet to fill. Everything else can be done with pens and paper or with a computer (but pen and paper is usually simpler)

4) no, you don't need maps, especially if you play with just one player. With more, using an erasable board or one of the many programs there are can be useful.

5) You do need at least one game master, one player. You can use the dice from the boardgame or simple six-sided dice.

Hope it helps.
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mak logan
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You were very helpful. Thanks. So one plays the bad guy(gamemaster) or he is just the narrator?
 
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Shelby Babb
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ODYNH wrote:
You were very helpful. Thanks. So one plays the bad guy(gamemaster) or he is just the narrator?


Typically the players have one character each that is theirs (a PC). The Gamemaster (GM) controls all the non-player characters (NPCs) along with the environment, as well as acting as narrator of... pretty much everything that isn't controlled by the players.

Dice are used as impartial randomizers, with PCs and NPCs having modifiers to help sway the results in their favor. However, the GM also will inevitably have to make impartial judgment calls when something happens that the rules don't cover. Because going past the rules, off script, into new territory, is what sets a true table top RPG apart from pretty much every other genre of game out there.

Now, having said all that, there's literally decades worth of different games doing different things, and (sometimes passionate) debate on which way to have fun playing them is "correct".
 
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Ângelo Cossa
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ODYNH wrote:
You were very helpful. Thanks. So one plays the bad guy(gamemaster) or he is just the narrator?


Well, i think you need to look at an rpg session on you tube, or play one session of any RPG to get the idea, so you know what to expect.

In a RPG the Game master is like a judge, he creates the adventure and narrate to the players play (so yes, he is a narrator), some people even say the game master don't play, and is boring to be, i disagree, i liked to be a GM. Anyways play any RPG session before you buy the book, that's the Advice.
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mak logan
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Much appreciated. So, the rpg uses all the miniatures from the game? I guess monsters as antagonists,heroes as player's choice. But Divinities and troops where all these it? They are good, bad, NPCs?
 
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Shelby Babb
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ODYNH wrote:
Much appreciated. So, the rpg uses all the miniatures from the game? I guess monsters as antagonists,heroes as player's choice. But Divinities and troops where all these it? They are good, bad, NPCs?


Not all RPGs use minis. But ultimately, the minis are best thought of as combat reference points. "These guys are being used in place of lamias for this encounter, and they're here, here, and here, in relation to your PCs over there."
 
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Trent Y.
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RPGs are quite a different beast from boardgames. You have a wonderful freedom with RPGs, that can go well off the rails of any other game.

As the narrator (a term I like better than game master), you generally start by devising a rough story idea. So say you think about having a kingdom that has offended Aphrodite and she has called upon Poseidon to unleash a terrible creature that will either devour the Princess or the Kingdom. Now you’ve got a bit of a story idea and some conflict that the player characters need to stop. Physical conflict is the easiest and most apt form of conflict in RPGs.

Next you talk to your players and figure out what sort of characters they would like to play and how they fit into this world/story. So in the story example above, you clearly want to set up the characters to be heroes and want to encourage them to save the Princess/kingdom.

Now the above is just an example, you can have the story be as collaborative as you like. If you have strong opinioned players you can talk to them as learn what sort of stories they are interested in. It can be a good conversation, but with new players, they are often willing to roll with whatever story idea the narrator has.

As the narrator, you’ll need to use your words to describe the world that the players see and they will need to explain their actions in that world. It can be a very challenging but rewarding. As the narrator, you have to figure out how to put the character’s first in your world but at the same time put enough conflict and woe in their path so they have a balance of being heroic but with limitations.

I love narrating games and can’t wait to run some MB.
 
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Freelance Police
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Also do a search on "greek myth rpgs". Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/rpg/comments/1rkd5l/which_penpaper_...

Introduction to RPGs : https://wiki.roll20.net/Introduction_To_Tabletop_RPGs

Try to find a roleplaying group or game convention near you. You'll need other players, and most of them are willing to help you learn the genre.
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mak logan
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Very helpful links. Although I have a last question. As a RPG is a good game, average? enjoyable?
 
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Shelby Babb
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ODYNH wrote:
Very helpful links. Although I have a last question. As a RPG is a good game, average? enjoyable?


That's very subjective.

I've played and read a bunch, and my take away was "it's okay". The "problem" is that there are tons of games out there, at least as good, with more support. Heck, I can think of three dealing with Greek mythology alone (Lords of Olympus, and Hellas, stand out, but Scion, Agon, and Dogs of Hades might be worth looking into). And in terms of introductions to the hobby, I'd pick something else (e.g. Dungeons and Dragons 5ed, Savage Worlds, The Strange, Fate, Mutants & Masterminds, GURPS, ParanoiaXP, Delta Green, etc. etc. etc.)

It's not a bad game, and if you already have it you should try and give it a go. We all gotta' start somewhere.
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mak logan
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I currently don't own the RPG book. But I sincerely consider to buy the RPG pdf for 19.99$. Is it worth it for me and my wife mainly, and occasionally with some friends?
 
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Shelby Babb
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ODYNH wrote:
I currently don't own the RPG book. But I sincerely consider to buy the RPG pdf for 19.99$.


Don't. I mean, it's your money, do what you want, but there are some really good free and pay-what-you-want RPGs out there, that would be better to invest in. Go dig around at DriveThruRPG and see what catches your fancy.

But mainly....

ODYNH wrote:
Is it worth it for me and my wife mainly, and occasionally with some friends?


.... I wouldn't recommend RPGs for less than 4 people (one "narrator/Game Master" and three players) or more than 6. You could certainly do it with just you and your wife, but honestly I think you'd have more fun playing a board game with RPG elements or a MMO instead. The problem (I think) with one-on-one TTRPGs is that it can seem a lot like the narrator just bullying one person, whereas a party of players can support each other and give the GM multiple targets to spread things out. And ultimately, TTRPGs are a more social game than other genres of games; you just don't get the same socialization when it's just two people playing.

EDIT: if you're just doing some casual gaming once in a while with friends, you might consider looking into "story games" like Fiasco or Microscope (or any of Ben Robbins' works really). They're not RPGs in the traditional sense, but they definitely have role-playing in them.
 
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Matt K
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Tabletop RPGs are just collaborative storytelling with some rules to help determine outcomes of actions. Everyone feels differently about them and how you feel about them can depend on a number of different factors including which rpg you are playing, how simple or complex the rules are, whether you are GMing or just playing, how good the GM is at crafting a compelling story, etc.

Honestly it’s something I think everyone should at least try but my advice is to have someone who is good at thinking of and telling stories be the GM. Also, remember to be flexible about everything. Unlike with board games, the rules are not the final arbiter of how to play. They are just guidelines. The GM has the final say in all things and should be trying to craft an enjoyable experience for all the players. This means asking what aspects the players are interested in and tailoring the campaign to them. If they are more interested in socializing, combat, or some other part of the adventure, the GM should listen and try to accommodate. Ultimately RPGs are about telling a story collaboratively since literally anything can happen as the rules do not restrict anyone in what they can try to do or where the story can potentially go. This freedom is the main draw of RPGs over board games and if that interests you, you should give it a go, with whatever rpg sounds exciting to you. Just keep in mind GMs often need time to prepare a story in advance unless you use a premade story which some RPGs provide but even then you still have to read it ahead of time. Just saying there’s a greater time investment than with board games generally.

RPGs can be a lot of fun and GMing can be very rewarding if you are passionate about storytelling.
 
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mak logan
Greece
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Again many thanks for the sincere answers. It is nice to have a better grasp of the rpg book element
 
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