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Victory at Midway» Forums » Rules

Subject: Calling Ben Knight.... rss

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Eric H
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Hi Ben,

Please excuse the impertinence, but if you could answer the question on whether strikes may target hexes where suspected -- but not confirmed -- enemy ships are located, it would be very useful.

The game is fantastic, but this rule will have an enormous impact on play. What was the original intent? It looks like it might be allowed, but in the absence of an answer, I would play the other way (as disallowed) for the following reasons:

(1) In a two-player game, my own searches will give data away to an adversary beyond what he should probably rightly have. (Surface search gives my position away.) Yes, a spotter aircraft would alert an adversary in real life to the general presence within nearby oceans of an enemy fleet, but not much more.

(2) As others have observed, I cannot recall (or imagine) a WWII naval commander launching a strike based on ruling out other areas. He would not be sufficiently confident in his searches to rule out large sea areas. There may be circumstances in a game where one might be confident, but in my view that is a game-ism.

All this said, I would like to play it the way the game designer intended and would love to get a response on this critical question from him.

Cheers -- and thanks for the great game!
Eric
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Nicola S
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I clearly am no Ben Knight, but I believe the answer lies in how the rules are structured, and moreover the way the examples of play are intertwined with them. In particular, if you look at the example for Air Strikes it picks up from where the example for Searches left and the US player ends up attacking the only hex where it spotted something in the previous Step.
Also, given the fact that there is no example of play that suggests that players are 'guessing'where the opponent is and then launching a strike makes me even more inclined to think that it is not a legitimate tactic.
Finally, if a player were allowed to launch without having spotted I do not see what kind of benefit would bring having actually spotted the enemy (at the cost of having exposed oneself in doing it) and also the optional rule 'not finding the enemy' would make basically no sense...

Beware: my very own 2cents only.
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Dan Raspler
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_viper_ wrote:
Beware: my very own 2cents only.


I will add my 2 cents to Nicola's (raising this opinion to a total value of 4 cents): I don't believe you can strike a hex you haven't searched, either.

Enjoy this most outstanding game!
 
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Subatomic Birdicle
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Boinky10 wrote:

(2) As others have observed, I cannot recall (or imagine) a WWII naval commander launching a strike based on ruling out other areas.


Well, that's exactly what the Japanese did at Midway. Their counterstrike against the U.S. carriers just hoped for the best and ended up following returning U.S. aircraft back to Yorktown.

The VaM rules say you can launch a strike against any hex in range.

To make it more explicit, the sequel game Seven Seas to Victory (also by Ben Knight) says:

"8.3 During Step 3, both players may assign Ready aircraft to fly strike missions. Such aircraft may be flown to any hex within their range, whether or not the target hex was searched by you in Step 2 (for instance, a player could guess where enemy ships might be)."

Both the history and the rules make it clear to me that airstrikes against suspected enemy locations are allowed. Of course, that will use up your Readied aircraft, which is the big disadvantage of not waiting for a confirmed sighting.

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