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Folklore: The Affliction» Forums » General

Subject: Replayability and where it comes from rss

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Walter Gagajewski
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I have looked at this game for a while now and am thinking about jumping in late to the kickstarter but would like to get some feedback from people who have played the game.

One of the reviewers compared this to Touch of Evil. I have played that game and enjoy it. With the number of events and random aspects to the game, you could use the same characters and have a different experience every game.

Is this the same with Folklore or are the missions fairly consistent from play to play?

Are there enough random elements to make the game different from play to play? I don't want to run through the entire event deck after two plays.

Are the missions fairly straight forward or do you have freedom to roam around the map?

I am also a big fan of Shadows of Brimstone. Do this game compare to that at all?

Thanks for the feedback.

 
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James W
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Folklore, at its core, is a series of adventures that you don't need a gamemaster to run. Shadows of Brimstone is a random dungeon generator using cards to generate each room. Every time you sit down for the same adventure in FL, you'll get a similar adventure/story but there are elements that will make each one a little different.

The off-road and road decks are both fairly substantial and I don't think I had to reshuffle the road deck during my play-through of the base box - so there is some variety there. Each card has a day and a night side (depending on when you draw the card, so drawing the same card again, there's a chance it's still a new event.

The world events add some variety to the play as they will change something for part of a story.

The rumors deck gives side quests and this gives a lot of small side adventures which will have you moving around the map. But for every "turn" spent moving around the map (representing either a day or a night), you draw a road or off-road event.

The rules, as written, only allow a single rest per chapter excluding nights spent at inns in the towns (assuming a world event didn't shut those down). The game can be challenging. If you want a more free-form adventure, you may want to house rule it.

I enjoy Shadows of Brimstone and Folklore. I think Shadows of Brimstone is an easier game to play a random adventure while Folklore feels like it should be a campaign. SoB is a little fiddlier with tokens while FL requires annotation on character sheets to track statuses. Both are heavily luck driven but Grit in SoB gives a bit more luck mitigation for rerolls. I prefer the tile art on folklore as there's more variety of locations (compared to just the caves or swamp/frozen city). You also spend far less time on these tiles as tactical combat is only a piece of the game. There's also world map travel and skirmishes which are abstracted combat.

Combat in FL can sometimes be a slog due to the length of the encounters but also feels deadlier as enemies have more health and stronger attacks than you do. You aren't fighting hordes of spiders and tentacles. Instead you have three skeletons shambling towards you and a witch cast spells at a distance. The maps are small so combat doesn't feel as tactical as in some other games (except for ranged opponents where you're chasing each other around). The map places the enemies and the heroes so each battles have some variety unlike SoB where they tend to take place at the bottleneck connecting map pieces. But each time you play the second chapter of the third story, the second encounter will set up exactly the same way. Who wins initiative and moves first has a huge effect on how battles play out. If you search areas during combat (or the results of the searches) can swing how that battle goes.
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Walter Gagajewski
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Thanks for the great feedback. So, if you try and replay the adventure, the core of the adventure is still the same so you would know what to expect but the side/road events that pop up during the play through provide the variability.

Are the adventures still a challenge the second time through?
 
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James W
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Making this example up, so as not to spoil the real adventures.

If you were supposed to go from Waylin Point to Belvar Estate to fight a vampire, you'd always do that. But if there was a choice to throw a coin in the wishing well or give the coin to a beggar, you'd get a token or be told to read a paragraph that could change the game slightly. Maybe you get a bonus, maybe the bad guy gets a bonus. Maybe you learn about a new room/location that gives you some advantage or disadvantage. It's like playing the same D&D module or video game RPG multiple times.

The mechanics make the game challenging enough. Knowing that after a battle you'll have another tough fight so you should rest or save your abilities makes a second play-through a bit easier.

I've played through the base game solo and would love to play it with a group and enjoy their reactions to the various story elements. I don't think this is as endlessly re-playable like SoB. It's longevity will be from both user created content and future expansions.
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Jason B
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Agreed- it's not as endlessly replay-able, but each play is much more rich.

I mean, if you think about it, every game of SOB is the same, just stuff shifted around. That doesn't mean it's bad. The core story to FL will be the same the second time around, but enough will change, and you will change, to make it fun anyway.
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Casey Nordell

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puckstop98 wrote:
Every time you sit down for the same adventure in FL, you'll get a similar adventure/story but there are elements that will make each one a little different.


I haven't yet played Folklore and I too am interested in replayability. One you thing you didn't mention in your awesome answer was about he different characters. I plan on playing either solo or with one other person, but between the core and expansion there are twelve characters with different abilities. Since I'd only be playing with two characters at a time, I would assume that replaying the campaign with different characters would also provide a quite different experience, correct?
 
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C K
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I have played the first full story twice now. Like others, there are random story situations where if you pass or fail a dice roll, or choose to do something in the story, it will have effects later on that are unknown. I had two completely different story experiences. When I realized it, I was pretty shocked/surprised ((in a good way)) it was like a light that turned on and I told the group, I really don't remember ever being here, or having this happen... or why we didn't do a certain thing when I did it last time.

Again, this is just from my experience and I am sure the situations if you replay for a 3rd time, you will probably end up getting some things similar.

There are going to be very linear areas, but that is typically where the road events and how you choose to get from destination point A to point B will make the difference.

also, having different characters in your group with different skills. Player count and other things will make it difficult or easier depending on how your adventure goes.

It really is a semi difficult game ((I tend to like it that way, it's not impossible with two people, just need to be very cautious)). It isn't meant for you to always win things which I tend to like. I believe GBG stated that these characters you are playing are not gods or over powered people, but just regular people with irregular powers / gifts an a world of folklore.

People have stated as well rumor cards ((if you do get them)) might swing the game to make it easier as you can spam extra missions, but if you keep it to one or two rumor cards per story, you have a lot of other side quests to go on for use for later.

Not to mention there is an adventure creation kit.

The game is still fairly new and I am thinking that people are either finishing up by now a full run through of base and expansion stories and we will soon see different adventures created by other gamers who have the game.

It will end up having more content later which will add to the overall value to this one.

I am a fan of this game, really I am. If you really are unsure about it, go with the base game and at least get the second expansion. You can always resell it or give it to others as a gift if you are not liking the game or feel the replayability is lacking.

I am sure GBG if they see the success will continue to pump out stories or expansions later on.

Hope that helps.

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James W
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PoshFrosh wrote:
puckstop98 wrote:
Every time you sit down for the same adventure in FL, you'll get a similar adventure/story but there are elements that will make each one a little different.


I haven't yet played Folklore and I too am interested in replayability. One you thing you didn't mention in your awesome answer was about he different characters. I plan on playing either solo or with one other person, but between the core and expansion there are twelve characters with different abilities. Since I'd only be playing with two characters at a time, I would assume that replaying the campaign with different characters would also provide a quite different experience, correct?


There is variety in the character classes. Unfortunately there is only one healer (exorcist) so you either need to play with him, or use a variant to give you some more healing. He second edition has some improved rules for two player games. The first edition was pretty brutal. I started with two players and switched to three which I found to be more fun despite the extra book-keeping.

The variety of the characters is cool and even each one has two career paths that adds some variety if you choose to play with the smart one again.
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