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Legendary: A Marvel Deck Building Game» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Which Expansions of Legendary Should I Buy? rss

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Doug Mann
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The excellent deck-building game Marvel Legendary has become Upper Deck’s showcase game system, spawning a plethora of expansions. But not all expansions are created equal, so in this short set of reviews I’ll outline the highlights of each, and then rate them. I’m assuming you already have the base game box.

To understand the Legendaryverse, first of all you must understand there are two distinct types of expansions: the small box one, with a standard 100 poker-sized cards, and the big box ones, which feature 350-550 cards. I’ll rate each separately, in the order I believe you should buy them, based mainly on how essential they are to representing the entire Marvel Comics continuity since the Silver Age, secondarily on how much fun they are.

SMALL BOX EXPANSIONS ($18-25 Canadian from online stores)

1. FANTASTIC FOUR (2013): Out of print for a couple of years but currently back in the rotation, the FF expansion features, not surprisingly, the Fantastic Four and the Silver Surfer as heroes, Galactus and the Mole Man as baddies, and the Heralds and Subterraneans as villain groups, with some classic schemes, and the new Focus keyword. Unless you hate these characters, essential. Rating = A.

2. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY (2014): Features the five characters from the movie, Thanos as a mastermind, the infinity gems, and shard tokens as highlights. A solid and fun set, unless you don’t know who the Guardians are. Rating = A-.

3. PAINT THE TOWN RED (2014): Supposedly the Spiderverse, but since Spider-Man and several of his villains are already in other boxes, really just Spider-Woman and some dregs like the Scarlet Spider. Mysterio and the Sinister Six are cool, but Upper Deck missed their opportunity to put out a full Spidey big box with all his allies and villains in it. Includes a new Wallcrawl mechanic. Not needed unless you’re a arachno-fanatic. Rating = B-.

4. NOIR (2017): Based on a specific alternate universe storyline, this set places Angel, Daredevil, Iron Man, Luke Cage and Spidey in a noir setting where Professor X is a crime boss. An acquired taste at best, and definitely not in the main Marvel continuities. Rating = C.

5. CHAMPIONS (2018): Another story-specific set, featuring Ms. Marvel, Nova, Totally Awesome Hulk, and Fin Fang Foom as highlights. Not essential. Rating = C-.

6. CAPTAIN AMERICA 75th ANNIVERSARY (2016): Giving buyers no less than 3 versions of Cap along with the Winter Soldier, unless you like Nazis and swing jazz, this is thin gruel. Zola and Zemo as masterminds. Best skip it. Rating = D.

7. FEAR ITSELF (2015): This is actually an expansion to the Villains box, though everything in the Legendaryverse is compatible. Features Uru-Enchanted Iron Man, six sets of allies (with five breakers of something), and 8 “adversaries” e.g. Iron Fist, Ms. Marvel, Hawkeye. If you know what Uru is, maybe… but otherwise, stay away. Rating = F.

8. DEADPOOL (2016): OK, there’s Deadpool, who was already in the base set. But who the hell are Slapstick, Bob (Agent of Hydra), Solo and Macho Gomez? I don’t know and I don’t care. Rating = F.

angry 9. SPIDER-MAN HOMECOMING (2017): An attempt to cash in on the movie. Contains nothing essential. The worst of the small boxes. Skip it. Rating = Z.

BIG BOX EXPANSIONS ($35-65 Canadian online)

1. DARK CITY (2014): A gem of an expansion, absolutely essential once you have the base game. Featuring 350 new cards, including 14 heroes, 5 masterminds, 6 villain groups, and 2 new henchmen groups, you also get 8 schemes and 11 new special bystander cards. The highlights include X-Men Angel, Iceman, Jean Grey, Nightcrawler, Colossus, a new version of Wolverine, and Professor X (what, no Beast? A flub by Upper Deck – you can’t play the original team); time travellers Forge, Cable, and Bishop; street urchins Daredevil, Domino, Elektra, Ghost Rider Blade, and Iron Fist; masterminds Apocalypse (tough!), Kingpin (can be bribed), and Mephisto; villain groups the Emissaries of Evil, the Four Horsemen, and the Underworld; and henchmen the Maggia Goons. A new bribery mechanic applies to some of the baddies. Rating = A+ (the best expansion, can be got for less than $40, and you can use the smaller box to transport your sleeved cards).

2. X-MEN (2017): Another gem, with just under 400 cards, though somewhat lower rated since it’s basically filling in the hero-holes left by the previous expansions. This one brings out the X-Ladies in full force: Jubilee, Polaris, Psylocke, Kitty Pryde, Dazzler, the Phoenix and X-23, alongside the Beast, Legion, Havok, and split Colossus/Wolverine and Aurora/Nightstar cards, plus a few others. In effect replaces the fan-made expansions of some of these essential characters. In my view Upper Deck should have dropped the split cards, Cannonball and at least one of the villain groups (Shadow-X?) so they could include all of Alpha Flight as a distinct group – give us Canadians something to droll over! Where are the Vindicator and Sasquatch? The highlights for the masterminds are the Dark Phoenix (alongside a Dark Phoenix Saga scheme), Arcade and Mojo; for villains, the Hellfire Club and Shi’ar Imperial Guard (you actually get 7 groups instead of the standard 6 in these big boxes, along with 5 henchmen groups, of which only the Brood stand out). A new type of card, the Horrors, add some edge, while there are 9 heroic bystanders (X-kids like Karma and Wolfsbane), and a new X-Gene mechanic. Has somewhat more of a sense of world-building than the other sets, though you still need Dark City to fill out your roster of essential X-Men heroes. Rating = A.

3. VILLAINS (2014): This isn’t really an expansion but a mirror-universe version of Legendary where you play masterminds trying to overcome the heroes of the Marvel universe. It contains a whopping 500 cards in a longer, thinner box than the base game that comes with a play matt instead of a board. You recruit allies like Bullseye, Electro, Enchantress, Juggernaut, Loki, Magneto, Mystique and Ultron (all the ally sets look interesting) to fight the “commanders” (=masterminds) Dr. Strange, Nick Fury, Professor X and Odin. The equivalent to the villain groups are the “adversaries”: the Avengers, Marvel Knights, Defenders, Spider-Friends, original X-Men, uncanny X-Men, and uncanny Avengers, with the Asgardians, SHIELD, the Multiple Man (weak!) and the Cops as “backups” (=henchmen). The SHIELD agents from the base game have become Hydra agents and soldiers, with Madame Hydra replacing Maria Hill. Wounds have become “bindings” that you can pass off to your fellow super-villains, with the predictable squabbling resulting. Basically a translation of the base game through a dark mirror, with more aggression against your fellow cooperators possible. It includes a new type of card call “New Recruits” that give you 1 attack + a card pull before being discarded. The art is a definite improvement on the base game: most of the heroes and villains really sparkle. I even prefer the generic Hydra cards to the base game's SHIELD agents. Rating = A- (though probably an A all on its own, not as an “expansion”).

wow 4. CIVIL WAR (2016): A big drop off in quality, even though I’ve read and admired the Civil War storyline this is based on. Here Iron Man, Maria Hill and Misty Knight are masterminds, the henchmen and villain groups B-listers (except the Thunderbolts and Heroes for Hire), with special sidekicks (e.g. Zabu and Lockjaw) and “grievous wounds” added. The highlights of the new heroes include Hercules, Luke Cage, Tigra, Vision, and the Falcon, plus new versions of Cap and Peter Parker. Rating = C.

5. SECRET WARS I (2015): A story-specific expansion with 350 cards, the hero highlights include Black Panther, Black Bolt, Dr. Strange, Namor and Captain Marvel, plus five “versions” of heroes you should already have. The most interesting of the new masterminds is the Goblin Queen (though there’s a perfectly good fan expansion of her on the Geek), with not much of interest among the villains and henchmen. Also contains ambition and sidekick cards. Of use mainly because it contains the only official versions of the five classic Marvel heroes listed above. Also with sidekicks ("holy bad memory, Batman!"). Rating = C.

6. SECRET WARS II (2015): The leftover dregs of Part 1. The best heroes are Captain Britain and the Beast (but he’s in the X-Men set now), the best mastermind is King Hyperion. Not recommended, unless you’re a completist and already have Part 1. Rating = D.

MY FINAL SUGGESTION

Assuming you’re not as rich as Tony Stark and want to simply buy everything, I suggest buying the expansions in this order:

1. Dark City (350 cards)
2. Fantastic Four (100 cards)
3. X-Men (394 cards)
4. Guardians of the Galaxy (100 cards)
5. Villains (rated lower in part because it costs $62-70, though it contains 500 cards)

This will give you 1500 new cards in addition to the base set. I recommend Mayday Premium sleeves (green), available at most online stores.

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Justin H

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Not at all how I would rank them, but thanks for sharing. Would you really recommend Villains to somebody who is not buying more than 5 expansions of Legendary? It clashes with the rest of the sets adding different terminology and while keeping the same core gameplay, increases the PVP aspect a lot. I would recommend Secret Wars Vol. 1, but then again I would rank it much higher than you have here. You also forgot to note that SW1 comes with sidekicks, which are a big bonus.
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Adelin Dumitru
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A bit too biased for my taste, definitely not a resource I'll direct new users to . There's something valuable in each expansion, including Deadpool and Homecoming.
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Justin H

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AdelinDumitru wrote:
A bit too biased for my taste, definitely not a resource I'll direct new users to . There's something valuable in each expansion, including Deadpool and Homecoming.


It appears that the OP is a ranking based upon Doug's opinion of the sets. I don't think having an opinion means he's biased.

If somebody told me that they were only going to buy 5 sets, and want to know which ones to buy, I would certainly recommend them to buy my 5 favorite sets.
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Brad Shimp
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Thanks for sharing your rankings and reasons. I recently bought my son our first 2 expansions, Secret Wars I and Spiderman Homecoming. Only played with them a bit yet. I will say, at first glance, I can see why Homecoming is ranked so low. The stills from the movie are a incongruous with the other cards.

That being said, playing with some of those cards had my son wanting to watch the movie again. And I am looking forward to trying the Cooperation/Companion keyword that lets players offer assistance to each other.

So far, I am loving the Secret Wars cards. Not sure if it is in other sets, but Teleport is so useful. And Sidekicks? They are the bomb. Not to mention some of our favorite Marvel characters like Dr. Strange and Black Panther.

If these are bottom of the list expansions, I can't wait to try more!
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Fromper Fromper
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I find it interesting that he ranks them based on how essential they are to the main Marvel continuity, and puts playing fun second. That certainly explains his opinions, and why they're so different than many others here. I do a little of that in my buying, as well, but not as much as Doug, apparently.

At this point, I've bought the base set, Paint the Town Red, Dark City, Fantastic Four, and Captain America 75th Anniversary, in that order. Spidey was my favorite superhero as a kid, and everyone keeps saying how essential Dark City is, so I started with those, and wasn't disappointed. Even though the heroes in PTTR are nothing exciting, the masterminds, schemes, and villains are great. I kept hearing good things about the Fantastic Four set, and they're so core to Marvel that I felt like I had to get that set, even though I've never really read the F4 comics. I wasn't planning to buy Cap75, since it seemed like too many versions of Cap, but then I watched a video review online, and it looked good. I'm really enjoying that set so far.

I keep hearing good things about the Secret Wars expansions, so even though I don't know the comics story or many of the alternate universe versions of the characters, I plan on making SW1 my next buy. SW2 is also on my list to get eventually, but I don't know what order I'll buy the rest after SW1 yet.

Edit to add: Just as a counterpoint, here are two lists that seem to agree better with the majority opinions here on BGG than Doug's list in this thread. Not that Doug's opinion is bad, but I figure new players will want to see various opinions and draw their own conclusions:

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1813208/unofficial-buyers-g...
https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1949246/post-champions-set-...
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Jay M
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The thing that has surprised me the most is how much I like all the expansions.
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Ben R
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Fromper wrote:

I keep hearing good things about the Secret Wars expansions, so even though I don't know the comics story or many of the alternate universe versions of the characters, I plan on making SW1 my next buy. SW2 is also on my list to get eventually, but I don't know what order I'll buy the rest after SW1 yet.



If you are neutral/really like the idea behind crossovers and don't mind or enjoy some rather interesting takes on classic heroes, then get SW1 and SW2 immediately. They add (in my opinion) some excellent key words for both the heroes and the villains, and the multi-classed cards are executed very well. Also - Sideckicks are INCREDIBLY useful.

As far as Small Boxes to get, the only other two I would say you NEED to get right now are Noir (once again if you can stomach alternate continuities/versions) and Champions.

Noir is an interesting take on what superheroes would have been like back in the 20's-30's and succeeds in bringing that gritty feel across while also having some killer mechanics that fit the theme perfectly.

IMO, Champions is just pure fun. It's a little wacky (but that's what the Champions are supposed to be like) but not Deadpool levels of OTT. Also, the card designs are fantastic. Cheering Crowds fits in with the theme of the Champions and also is really useful. This was also the second and third uses of Size-Changing and Demolish (respectively), and it shows as Champions uses both of those keywords better than any other set so far.
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Dan Harshman
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The Sidekicks from Secret Wars 1 are incredibly useful.

I'd rate it higher for that alone.
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SilverFirePrime wrote:
Fromper wrote:

I keep hearing good things about the Secret Wars expansions, so even though I don't know the comics story or many of the alternate universe versions of the characters, I plan on making SW1 my next buy. SW2 is also on my list to get eventually, but I don't know what order I'll buy the rest after SW1 yet.



If you are neutral/really like the idea behind crossovers and don't mind or enjoy some rather interesting takes on classic heroes, then get SW1 and SW2 immediately. They add (in my opinion) some excellent key words for both the heroes and the villains, and the multi-classed cards are executed very well. Also - Sideckicks are INCREDIBLY useful.

As far as Small Boxes to get, the only other two I would say you NEED to get right now are Noir (once again if you can stomach alternate continuities/versions) and Champions.

Noir is an interesting take on what superheroes would have been like back in the 20's-30's and succeeds in bringing that gritty feel across while also having some killer mechanics that fit the theme perfectly.

IMO, Champions is just pure fun. It's a little wacky (but that's what the Champions are supposed to be like) but not Deadpool levels of OTT. Also, the card designs are fantastic. Cheering Crowds fits in with the theme of the Champions and also is really useful. This was also the second and third uses of Size-Changing and Demolish (respectively), and it shows as Champions uses both of those keywords better than any other set so far.

Thanks for the recommendations, but I'm in no rush. I've only been playing about 2-3 months, and I already have 5 sets. I like taking my time to try out everything in a new set (or 2 small ones) before moving on, and I just picked up Fantastic Four and Cap 75 last week. It'll probably be at least a few weeks until I'm ready to buy another, and that will almost definitely be Secret Wars 1.

After that, I know that I don't want Spider-Man: Homecoming, but everything else is pretty much on my "maybe" list, including the Villains base set, Fear Itself expansion, and most of the non-Marvel Legendary games. I'm actually a much bigger fan of Buffy and Firefly than Marvel comics, but I don't have friends to play with who would know the characters and stuff. Marvel is easier to play with just about anyone, since most people these days know at least some of the characters from the various movies.

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Tom
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Gotta concur with Jay. I like every expansion, and own every one except the Villain expansions, which do not interest me. I like getting new key words with every expansion, and love the art on the cards.
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Doug Mann
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Look up the word "bias" in the dictionary. Here's Oxford:

Inclination or prejudice for or against one person or group, especially in a way considered to be unfair.

‘there was evidence of bias against foreign applicants’
‘the bias towards younger people in recruitment’

I'm offering a critique based on clearly stated criteria: continuity + fun. By your use of the term, all movie critics should immediately retire.
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Doug Mann
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PS I think that all the expansions I've played or seen are fun.

But you can't buy everything you want, right?
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Adelin Dumitru
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dmann wrote:
Look up the word "bias" in the dictionary. Here's Oxford:

Inclination or prejudice for or against one person or group, especially in a way considered to be unfair.

‘there was evidence of bias against foreign applicants’
‘the bias towards younger people in recruitment’

I'm offering a critique based on clearly stated criteria: continuity + fun. By your use of the term, all movie critics should immediately retire.


You are biased against expansions which have less known characters, though often they often have the most fun mechanics.
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Adelin Dumitru
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For example, you rate very low Fear Itself because "if you know what Uru is, maybe… but otherwise, stay away. Rating = F." Given that Fear Itself has some of the best mechanics... Weird choice. If you had framed it as your own top, I would not have commented. But you made it seem as if you recommended expansion x and y for what you say were 2 criteria but ultimately fell back onto just 1,i.e. how familiar you were with the characters.
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Tyrell Archer
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Many people rate Spider-Man: Homecoming very low because of the art, but I personally am very fond of it. I love the new (to Marvel Legendary) keywords, Coordinate and Danger Sense. In addition, I really like the idea of a Hero deck based on a group (Peter's Allies) and a Villain deck based on gear or equipment. I imagine it to be the Mastermind (whoever it may be) to be wearing the Vulture gear, which in the MCU is a lot more intimidating, being based on a combination of Ultron cybernetics, Chitauri tech, and stolen StarkTech.

I would love to see this kind of thinking in comic based expansions. It would be an interesting way to get smaller or lesser known teams in the game (ie, a single Hero deck for the New Warriors, or perhaps Peter's Allies in the comics), or to have Villain gear that is used by others (we've already seen this once as the Infinity Gems).
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Fromper Fromper
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I don't care about the screen shots as art. I used to play the Star Wars CCG by Decipher years ago, and that used screen prints from the movies. There were a couple of computer generated images here and there for expanded universe things that weren't from the movies, and I was fine with mixing them in.

Honestly, I don't know much about Spider-Man: Homecoming. I haven't even seen the movie. But I've heard that the expansion has two masterminds who are the same person, and that there are non-superhero characters as playable "heroes" (Peter's Friends), and that's kind of a turn off. My problem with the Homecoming set is thematic.

Similarly, looking at the Civil War and Secret Wars sets, I didn't like the villains as playable characters and heroes as masterminds and villains. I don't mind that sort of thing in the context of the Villains version of the game, which I may get eventually. But if I'm playing the regular version of the game, picking up Thanos as a "hero" and Iron Man as the "mastermind" just seems thematically wrong to me. I plan to get Secret Wars 1 as my next purchase, whenever that ends up being, but I'll probably put aside the non-heroic "heroes" and save them to mix into the Villains set when/if I ever get that, rather than playing them in the normal game.

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dmann wrote:
8. DEADPOOL (2016): OK, there’s Deadpool, who was already in the base set. But who the hell are Slapstick, Bob (Agent of Hydra), Solo and Macho Gomez? I don’t know and I don’t care. Rating = F.

Haha... I'm a big collector of Deadpool comics. I love this set. When the randomizer picks anything from it, I know the game is going to be a wild, unconventional, ride. If you don't know who Macho Gomez is, you're missing out.

On a different note: I find it interesting that a lot of players don't like to incorporate Heroes as Villains or vice versa into their play, because a hero is supposed to be a good guy and a villain is supposed to be a bad guy.

My love for Marvel comics came about after years of watching Saturday cartoons where the Justice League and Superfriends would win, all the time, every Saturday. It didn't seem realistic to me and I craved imperfect heroes and an occasional victory by the dark side, just to keep everyone on their toes, or even because the villain deserved it once in a while. Marvel comics was the breath of fresh air I needed (Not to put DC down, they have certainly gotten grittier over time, like with Batman, Harley, etc...).

But with Marvel, heroes had flaws. Heroes could die. They were like you and I. Good guys turned bad and bad guys (rarely, but not unheard of) turned good. And sometimes, even a villain could be a hero. Some of my fondest memories were when Dr. Doom joined forces with the good guys to defeat an even greater threat to the world, or when heroes would occasionally become corrupt and fight an ally, fulfilling that itch of knowing which superhero would win in a fight against another superhero.

I totally understand and respect those that hold heroes to a white knight standard of purety, goodness, justice, and altruism. To each their own. But I love that Legendary (in Villains) embraced the fact that every hero has a dark side and sometimes you need to fight a greater evil with evil. It really makes it feel like the Marvel universe as it was intended to be, at least for me. Now, if they would only make a Dr. Doom hero card! Lol, oh man, some of you might cringe, but I can imagine so many storylines that have yet to be written...

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Darth Ed
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Mystical_1 wrote:
On a different note: I find it interesting that a lot of players don't like to incorporate Heroes as Villains or vice versa into their play, because a hero is supposed to be a good guy and a villain is supposed to be a bad guy.

My love for Marvel comics came about after years of watching Saturday cartoons where the Justice League and Superfriends would win, all the time, every Saturday. It didn't seem realistic to me and I craved imperfect heroes and an occasional victory by the dark side, just to keep everyone on their toes, or even because the villain deserved it once in a while. Marvel comics was the breath of fresh air I needed (Not to put DC down, they have certainly gotten grittier over time, like with Batman, Harley, etc...).

But with Marvel, heroes had flaws. Heroes could die. They were like you and I. Good guys turned bad and bad guys (rarely, but not unheard of) turned good. And sometimes, even a villain could be a hero. Some of my fondest memories were when Dr. Doom joined forces with the good guys to defeat an even greater threat to the world, or when heroes would occasionally become corrupt and fight an ally, fulfilling that itch of knowing which superhero would win in a fight against another superhero.

I totally understand and respect those that hold heroes to a white knight standard of purety, goodness, justice, and altruism. To each their own. But I love that Legendary (in Villains) embraced the fact that every hero has a dark side and sometimes you need to fight a greater evil with evil. It really makes it feel like the Marvel universe as it was intended to be, at least for me. Now, if they would only make a Dr. Doom hero card! Lol, oh man, some of you might cringe, but I can imagine so many storylines that have yet to be written...

Speaking as someone who resembles those remarks, I have to say that my main complaint is fighting against heroes, specifically Villain Groups that are comprised of heroes and especially Masterminds who are heroes. I really don't care if there are a hundred issues of Marvel Comics in which heroes teamed up to fight against Professor X. I don't want to fight Professor X. I want to help Professor X. That's just one example. I have no problem with villains joining forces with heroes to fight an overwhelming greater threat, like Galactus or a virus threatening to wipe out all of mutantkind. Dr. Doom and Magneto are great examples of characters who have done those sorts of things at various times. However, there are certain team-ups that I feel are strongly objectionable and unthematic, like Daredevil and Bullseye. Those two would rather kill each other than work together, and I have no interest in playing a setup with those two in the Hero Deck. I certainly don't mind villains turning good either, as long as the narrative is well written and their characters' motivations are sound. Magneto was leader of the X-Men for many issues. I'm totally cool with that, and I hope we someday see Magneto as a playable hero in Legendary.
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Mystical_1 wrote:
On a different note: I find it interesting that a lot of players don't like to incorporate Heroes as Villains or vice versa into their play, because a hero is supposed to be a good guy and a villain is supposed to be a bad guy.

My love for Marvel comics came about after years of watching Saturday cartoons where the Justice League and Superfriends would win, all the time, every Saturday. It didn't seem realistic to me and I craved imperfect heroes and an occasional victory by the dark side, just to keep everyone on their toes, or even because the villain deserved it once in a while.


That's funny. Besides the superheroes winning every Saturday on Superfriends, I remember similar cliche superheros in Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends and The Incredible Hulk cartoons from the same era. Not to mention The Transformers and G.I. Joe, who were published as comics by Marvel while the cartoons were running. That's not a DC vs Marvel thing. That's just Saturday morning cartoons aimed at a young audience in that era.

Mystical_1 wrote:
Marvel comics was the breath of fresh air I needed (Not to put DC down, they have certainly gotten grittier over time, like with Batman, Harley, etc...).

But with Marvel, heroes had flaws. Heroes could die.


I believe the death of Ferro Lad in DC's Legion of Superheroes in 1967 was the first "on screen" death of a main character superhero in American comics. The Legion actually had quite a few deaths over the years, enough to make their memorial statues a major part of their HQ that showed up regularly in the comics. And of course, DC killed off quite a few characters in 1986 with Crisis on Infinite Earths, with Supergirl and Flash being the biggest. And then Robin was killed by the Joker two years later in the pages of Batman. But we won't talk about Superman's temporary death event.

Mystical_1 wrote:
They were like you and I. Good guys turned bad and bad guys (rarely, but not unheard of) turned good. And sometimes, even a villain could be a hero. Some of my fondest memories were when Dr. Doom joined forces with the good guys to defeat an even greater threat to the world, or when heroes would occasionally become corrupt and fight an ally, fulfilling that itch of knowing which superhero would win in a fight against another superhero.


Have you never read Frank Miller's classic Dark Knight Returns, featuring the epic fight of Batman vs Superman? It's one of several times those two have gone at it (spoiler: Batman ALWAYS wins). And of course, more than one Green Lantern has gone over to the dark side, along with Batman's second Robin (when he came back from the dead), and there are quite a few villains who have become heroes in DC. Some of them stuck to the good side (Maxima, Pied Piper), while others were just temporary (most Suicide Squad members over the years).

Again, not a DC vs Marvel thing.

If you're talking Silver Age comics, then yes, Marvel made a point of trying to make their superheroes more "realistic" than DC. That's why Peter Parker had financial issues, and the Fantastic Four were constantly fighting like family among themselves. But by the time period you're talking about with the Superfriends, DC had mostly caught up.

Mystical_1 wrote:
I totally understand and respect those that hold heroes to a white knight standard of purety, goodness, justice, and altruism. To each their own. But I love that Legendary (in Villains) embraced the fact that every hero has a dark side and sometimes you need to fight a greater evil with evil. It really makes it feel like the Marvel universe as it was intended to be, at least for me. Now, if they would only make a Dr. Doom hero card! Lol, oh man, some of you might cringe, but I can imagine so many storylines that have yet to be written...


And I enjoy some of those stories, too. But in the comics, movies, TV shows, etc when those things happen, there's a good story to go with them. In Legendary, you can set up those scenarios, but when you just pull a random setup, and Iron Man is employing Spider-Foes and Hand Ninjas to help him steal plutonium, while Thanos is trying to stop it, that would just stand out to me as weird. I can accept weird pairings of heroes, or weird pairings of masterminds/villains, but not complete role reversals outside of a story with good reasons for it.

As I said, I might get the Villains set eventually. If I do, the villainous "heroes" from Secret Wars and heroic "villains" and "masterminds" from Civil War will be mixed in with the Villains game. I'll treat regular Legendary and Villains as two separate games, only mixing them when I feel like doing something unusual, not for everyday randomization.

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David A
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Fromper wrote:
I don't care about the screen shots as art. I used to play the Star Wars CCG by Decipher years ago, and that used screen prints from the movies. There were a couple of computer generated images here and there for expanded universe things that weren't from the movies, and I was fine with mixing them in.

The thing is, the SWCCG was always designed with that look. Legendary didn't. It's like changing a horse in the middle of a race. It's just not right.
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Doug Mann
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POSTSCRIPT TO MY REVIEWS

1. I admit to favouring the X-Men and Spider-Man as the favourite superheroes of my youth. However, this is hardly esoteric – Hollywood agrees with me, since the first two big-budget movies they made were THE X-MEN (2000) and SPIDER-MAN (2002), with five more X-Men and Spider-Man movies following. That’s in part why I rate the X-Men set so highly, though if you look at Marvel Comic’s post-1975 history, X-Men titles are at the top of critical and sales lists, challenged only by Spidey.

2. I think the original set had some problems that Upper Deck tried to fix in other sets. First of all, having 14 hero cards with the same art was boring – I don’t enjoy looking at the same image of Cyclops over and over. Second, the way that they choose the hero sets was inconsistent: you get Nick Fury and a robust Avengers set, six X-Men from different eras (Cyclops, Storm, Wolverine, Gambit, Rogue, Storm), plus Deadpool thrown in. Third, the original masterminds were underpowered, as many others have said. Fourth, I think it was a mistake to try to shoehorn SOME villain teams into 8-card bundles by doubling 4 cards, e.g. the Brotherhood of Mutants include just Juggernaut, Mystique, the Blob and Sabertooth: why not single-card the last two and throw in Toad, Pyro or Destiny? Many comics teams had more than four members, which in some cases they later fixed by including single-card villains. Though I hesitate to say this, the original set needs a reboot.

3. I don’t fancy the art in the Fantastic Four set – it’s too cute, too Darwin Cooke-like. But these heroes are so essential to Marvel history, Galactus is the most bad-assed of villains, and they integrate nicely with Dr. Doom and the Doombots (also a good band name) from the base game.

4. I think there are several lost opportunities in Marvel Legendary that may or may not be fixed in future. First, in the X-Men set, why not shave off a few heroes and villains, and include Alpha Flight as a separate team? They’re more seminal than Cannonball and the Dark Descendants (another good band name). Include at least five of Vindicator, Guardian, Puck, Sasquatch, Shaman, Snowbird, Aurora and Nightstar. Or put them out as a robust 100-card box. Second, I don’t like the way that the core X-Men are distributed across several boxes. To get even the original team of five, later known as X-Force, you need the base game, Dark City, and X-Men. And why aren’t Namor and Dr. Strange in the base game? Namor was the first Marvel superhero ever!

5. Third, and perhaps most importantly, I think that they should have included a basic version of Spider-Man in the base set, and then later put out a medium-sized 200-250 card set that included an alternate version of Spidey, all the Paint the Town Red stuff, and all the famous Spidey villains in two or three teams. I would have liked to have seen the original Sinister Six as a team – make Doc Ock their mastermind, then include the Vulture, Electro, Kraken x2, Mysterio x 2 and Sandman x2. Instead, they’ve scattered the Spider-villains across the Spider-Foes (base game: two each of Doc Ock, Goblin, Lizard, Venom), the new Sinister Six (Paint the Town Red: Chameleon, Kraken, Sandman, Hobgoblin, Vulture x 2, Shocker x 2), the Emissaries of Evil (Dark City: Electro, the Rhino), and Maximum Carnage (PTTR: Carrion, Shriek, Demogoblin, Doppelganger).

Further, make the Goblin a second mastermind, J. Jonah Jameson a third, and then include a second team of later villains including Venom, Hobgoblin, etc. Lastly, include corrupt or angry New York cops as “henchmen”, and Daredevil, Electra, Deadpool, the Punisher and the Kingpin (taken from other sets) to flesh out the box. Call it something like “The Streets of New York.” It would have been a hot seller.

6. Postscript to my postscript: I agree with Tyrell that the New Warriors would be a nice set. I would like to see a small set based on the long-running EXILES series too.
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Tim Freerksen
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I honestly would take Paint the Town Red over villains but that's just me and I usually play it with teens and they like Spider-Man.

I want NextWave as an expansion.
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Chris Doelle
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I bought the Guardians of the Galaxy expansion and love it. That is the only one I have had a chance to try of the expansions so far.
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Yes, if you know the new Guardians based on the movies, you'll like the GoG set. The shards are a cool mechanic, really the only way to beat Thanos, who alongside Galactus and the Dark Phoenix are the mega-villains in the Legendary system, as they should be.
 
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