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Subject: Azul - A Detailed Review rss

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Dr. Dam
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May 2018 be all you dreamed it would be and be all that you dreamed...
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Image Courtesy of W Eric Martin

This review continues my series of detailed reviews that attempt to be part review, part resource for anyone not totally familiar with the game. For this reason I expect readers to skip to the sections that are of most interest.

If you liked the review please thumb the top of the article so others have a better chance of seeing it and I know you stopped by. Thanks for reading.

Summary

Game Type – Abstract Game
Play Time: 20-45 minutes
Number of Players: 2-4
Mechanics – Tile Placement, Set Collection
Difficulty – Pick-up & Play (Can be learned in 20 minutes)
Components – Excellent ++
Release – 2017
Awards - Spiel des Jahres (SdJ) + Deutscher Spielepreis (DsP) 2018

Designer – Michael Kiesling (7 Steps, Adventure Land, Artus, Asara, Australia, Coal Baron, Cuzco, Heaven & Ale, Java, Linko, Maharaja: The Game of Palace Building in India, Mexica, Nauticus, The Palaces of Carrara, Porta Nigra, Peublo, Reworld, Riverboat, That's Life!, Tikal, Torres, Vikings)

Overview and Theme

Azul takes its theme from Portugese history, when the then King was amazed by the Moorish decorative tiles used in an Alhambra in southern Spain. He immediately set workers to using the stunning tiles to decorate the walls of his palace in Evora. The players of Azul take on the roles of a tiler, seeking to create the best work of art to impress the King.

Like many a game, especially abstracts, the theme starts and stops here. Certainly the theme does come through in the use of tiles and what you are trying to do, but you don't really give this little backstory and real thought during the play. In truth Azul is a pattern building and tile placement game, with some interesting tile acquisition rules.

Azul was possibly the biggest sleeper hit to come out of Essen 2017. I remember seeing some of the buzz in the Con forums during the event and by November it was popping up everywhere. It took me until January to acquire a copy and I'm glad I did.

The designer Michael Kiesling, is of course part of the famous Kramer & Kiesling duo that were responsible for the classics, Torres, Tikal, Java and Mexica, with the first two winning the Spiel des Jahres (SdJ) in 1999 and 2000.

I may be in the minority but Wolfgang Kramer has always come across as the more famous of the duo, perhaps because Kramer has had other hits outside of the partnership. In doing some research for this review I was surprised to see how many designs the pair have created together and continue to create even in 2017 and those slated for a 2018 release. They are still going very strong some 20 years later.

But Azul is a moment for Kiesling to stand alone. So are all the positive vibes surrounding Azul warranted? What is it that is so appealing to so many?

Grab a tile and give me 10 minutes of your time...we are about to find out.

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The Components

Azul is a relatively simple production, but the quality in its main component is a large part of the games appeal (visual and otherwise).

d10-1 Boards – Each player needs access to their own personal board. They are decently thick affairs that feature two sides to allow for two forms of play.

The boards consist of 4 key areas. At the top can be found a scoring track, which is personal to each player. This is well designed, offering nice easy to see 5-point increments and it is ordered in such a way that moving your scoring token one position down represents a gain of 20 points exactly. Call me a geek but I like little touches like this. meeple

At the bottom of each board can be found a horizontal set of boxes, with associated negative values that increase from -1 through to -3 (more on these in due course). These boxes are called the Floor Line. In the bottom right corner can be found a concise summary of the end of game scoring bonuses.

But the main parts of the board are the two sections found in the middle. The left side acts as a series of holding boxes, in which tiles that are acquired can be placed. This is referred to as the 'Pattern Lines', I'm going to refer to them as holding boxes for simplicity's sake. It looks like a set of steps with each row offering one more box than the last (each row contains 1-5 boxes).

To the right of this section sits a colourful mosaic of tile art (these match the tiles used in the game). This section serves as the palace wall that each player is trying to adorn with gorgeous tiles.

The rear side of the boards are almost identical. The only change is that the colourful 'Wall' is replaced with bland grey squares instead.

I'm going to be a little critical here and say that the boards are a little disappointing in regards to one facet, I refer to the quality of the edging on them. I'm being a touch picky but the raw (exposed) edges seem beneath the production of the rest of the game. A bevelled or tapered edge, perhaps using the same material as the tiles would have elevated the boards considerably.

I would happily welcome a premium edition of the game in the future with such additions (already new tiles are being offered up as well as a premium '1' token).

I suspect it may happen if the game continues to do well beyond the current hotness. Perhaps a 10-year Anniversary Edition?


Image Courtesy of Alice87


d10-2 Tiles – It is the tiles though that are the star of the Azul show. These gorgeous square tiles come in 5 different types, with each being coloured or patterned in a different way. Apart from their colourful visage, what makes them special is the resin material they are made from. A bit like Samurai, which I covered earlier this year, I don't think they are made using Bakelite, but a resin in the same family.

The tiles are just beautiful to the touch and give the game a wonderful tactile feel. They also make a most satisfying clinking sound as they are mixed in the cloth, drawstring bag.

It continues to amaze me how we, as gamers, can be drawn to something so simple as quality tiles or pieces in a game. But it shouldn't be surprising I guess, given our (human's) appreciation of art and such.

In all there are 100 tiles in the box, 20 of each type.


Image Courtesy of K_I_T


d10-3 Plates and Tokens – The game then provides 9 cardboard discs adorned with patterns. The game tries to enhance the theme by referring to these as Factory Plates, implying that the tiles you are looking to acquire and use in your wall have come straight from the factory.

To me this seems a little clunky and unnecessary but it is what it is. I prefer to simply call them plates or platters and be done with it.

These are fairly functional from a game play point of view, as they serve as a location to place tiles upon each round. The artwork is nice enough without being outstanding.

Four black small cubes represent the player's Scoring Tokens and are sized to fit on the spaces used in the scoring track nicely.

Azul also comes with a Start Player Token that features the number '1'. In the first printing this came as a cardboard token. Already the company is offering a premium replacement tile, made from the same resin as the main tiles. I suspect this will become a regular inclusion in future print runs.


Image Courtesy of Alice87


d10-4 Cloth Bag – In a sign of how far we have come (in regards to expecting quality components in our games) Azul comes with a printed, well sized and attractive, drawstring cloth bag. I respect a bag that has plenty of space to put your hand into and be able to mix the contents around comfortably.

Once upon a time clever gamers (or their partners) would make custom material bags like this. Azul has us covered already.


Image Courtesy of mcfer


d10-5 Rules – The rules are a great example of being only as big as they need to be whilst still including important examples and text spacing. It makes them very easy to read and a snap for the game to be learned.

Existing game players might have been Azul's main target market, but its rule book and overall presentation will certainly help it attract and support a wider audience.


Image Courtesy of Alice87


Azul is an excellent production from Plan B Games to be sure and is well worth its asking price. I'll even give a shout out to the insert used by the game. Everything has a nice custom spot for it including the Start Player Token, which is recessed below the spaces that the Factory Plates sit in. Cuuuuute! kiss


Image Courtesy of Alice87


Set-Up

Azul has almost no set-up before play can begin. This is largely due to the fact that the tiles stay in the cloth bag upon packing the game away.

All that is needed is to place a number of Factory Plates on the table (ranging from 5-9 depending on the number of players). The Start Player Token is placed in the center of the plates and each player takes a board and scoring token, placing it at zero.

Each plate is filled with 4 randomly selected tiles, a start player is chosen and the game is ready to begin.

The Play

In keeping with the strengths of abstract designs, Azul uses a minimum of rules to define its play, which then create interesting decisions for the players.

d10-1 Take Tiles – On a player's turn they are wanting to take tiles, which they will eventually use to tile their Wall.

Tiles can be taken from two possible areas, but the golden rule is that only tiles of one type can be taken on a single turn and all tiles available of the type selected must be taken...whether you want them all or not.

Those two options are :-

mb Take Tiles from a Single Factory Plate – A player can only take tiles in an offering by taking all tiles of one type. Given the game has 5 tile types, it is often the case that many a plate offers 4 unique tiles or only a pair of a given tile type.

If tiles are taken from a Factory Plate, those that are not taken are moved to the central area. This leads to the second tile taking option.

mb Take Tiles from the Central Area – The central area of the table (the area inside all of the Factory Plates) can bulge with tiles if the players favour tiles found on the Factory Plates.

So option two for the players is to take tiles from the central area, but again, they must take all tiles of a single type if they take from the center. The first player to take from the center must take the '1' Start Player token. This guarantees them first pick in the next round, but it also costs them negative points. The token must be placed in the first available box to the far left of the Floor Line. Usually taking the Start Player Token will cost a player -1 victory point.

Naturally the option to take from the center area is not possible if no tiles currently reside there.

d10-2 Add Tiles to Rows – Once a player has taken their selection of a tile or tiles, they must add them to the holding boxes in the center-left of their board. This is a location where a player can hold tiles in preparation for Wall Tiling.

A player is only allowed to have tiles of one type in a single row. If a player takes more tiles than are needed to fill a row, the excess must be placed in the Floor Line (leftmost available boxes), costing the player negative points. Multiple rows can feature tiles of the same type and a player need not complete one row before starting another row with the same type of tile (although it may at times be unwise).

Image Courtesy of Alice87


Let's look at an example. In the image on the right, a player has 2 empty spots in the blue tile row. If they were to take a set of 3 blue tiles they could complete the blue row but they would have one excess blue tile, which would be placed in the leftmost Floor Line box, costing the player (in this case) -1 point. They cannot place that one excess blue tile in the empty top row. So in other words, a single taking of tiles can only be used to fill (or partially) fill a single row on a single turn.

mb A Restriction – A key rule however is that a player cannot add tiles of a given type to a row in their holding area, if that tile type already exists in their Wall, in that row. This may seem confusing now, but will make total sense by the end of this section. To help remember this, there are a set of triangles that point from each row in the holding area to the adjoining row in a player's Wall area.

d10-3 Ending the Tile Selection Phase – The play continues to move from one player to another until all tiles available for the round have been taken. All tiles must be added to a player's holding area or placed in the empty boxes of their Floor Line (where they will earn negative points).

When must a player place tiles in their Floor Line?

It is quite possible that some players may be forced to take tiles that they cannot place in their holding rows. This can be caused by having to take too many tiles of a given type (more than you have room for in a single row) or by having all rows started on their board and being forced to take tiles of a type that do not match (because a single row can only feature tiles of one type). goo

When this occurs, these tiles must be added to the Floor Line on a player's board. As per taking the Start Player Token, all tiles placed in this way must be placed to the far left of the Floor Line. Each spot in this row has a negative VP value, so the more boxes that are filled in this line, the more negative points a player will accrue for the round. This is, shall we say, undesirable.

d10-4 Wall Tiling – In this phase the players have the opportunity to move tiles from their holding area to the right-side of their board, which represents the wall they have been assigned in the King's Palace.

Filling this wall serves as the aim of the game as it is how the players score points. But how do they do it?

A player is allowed to move tiles from the left to the right of their boards when they complete a horizontal row in their holding area. Naturally it is very easy to fill in the 1, 2 and even the 3 long rows...but the 4 and 5 length rows take a little more work.

For each row that has been filled in, a player is allowed to move one of those tiles across to the right, placing that tile on the location that matches the tile itself. This is the only location a tile can be placed and given that each row of tiles in the Wall features each tile exactly once, we learn a new restriction of Azul.

That is, once a player has filled in a wall section with a given tile type, they cannot ever place those same tiles in that row of their holding area again! surprise

The process of moving a tile from the holding area to the Wall, is always done from the top down, with any rows that were not filled in being skipped over. This is important because each tile that is added to a player's Wall will earn points!

How many points though depends on how they go about filling in their Wall. meeple

This phase can be carried out simultaneously by the players, saving on time. In my experience though, the players like to go around the table and see the points that are being scored. It helps to keep track of how everyone is travelling and makes for a more collaborative experience. It doesn't really add that much time to the playing of the game and the players may learn something about the nature of their opponent's boards that may help them strategically in future rounds, when it comes to what tiles to take and what to leave. devil

d10-5 Scoring –

Image Courtesy of mcfer
Every time a tile is added to a player's Wall it will be scored. A tile scores based on how many other tiles it is connected to in both a vertical and horizontal fashion. Thus a tile added to your Wall in isolation to any other tiles is worth 1 point. If a tile is placed with one tile below it and two tiles to its right, it will score 5 points. This is because it has formed a chain of two tiles vertically and a three-tile chain horizontally. This reminds me very much of the scoring used in Qwirkle.

This highlights why it is important to add tiles to your Wall from top to bottom as it will have an impact on the scoring.

Each player must of course reflect the points they have earned by moving their scoring marker on their personal scoring track at the top of their board, remembering to deduct any negative points earned by filled boxes in their Floor Line. I guess thematically the Floor Line represents tiles that are dropped and broken on the floor?

When all players have updated their scores the game can progress. Well almost.

Any tiles left over in the holding area (those not added to a player's Wall) are removed from their board and placed to the side of the table. This not only frees up space in a player's holding area, but it also makes those tiles available again for future use once the bag contains no more tiles to draw (not immediately).

Any tiles that have scored negative points in a player's Floor Line are also removed in the same fashion.

d10-6 Re-setting for a New Round and Triggering the Endgame – If no one has triggered the endgame, the Factory Plates must be refilled. This is the same process as in the set-up, drawing 4 tiles at random from the bag to fill each plate. If the bag becomes empty during this process, all tiles that have been discarded to the table are returned to the bag to be drawn.

There can come a time when there are not enough tiles to fill all plates (usually 4-player games). In this case plates are filled as much as they can be.

The player that took the '1' Start Player Token last round returns it to the central area and they begin the new round by making the first selection.

mb Triggering the Endgame – This actually occurs in the Tile Walling phase. If a player manages to fill in any one of their horizontal rows in their Wall, the game will end immediately at the end of the current round (allowing all player's to score one last time).

Because the players cannot add more than 1 tile to any horizontal row in their Wall in a single round, the players need to pay attention to the position of all players and recognise when time may be running out. But by the same token the end-game trigger also gives the players some form of control and knowledge so they should not be totally surprised when the game does end. This is a nice feature for any game, but particularly an abstract design, where total chaos and luck are undesirable traits. thumbsup

d10-7 End Game Bonus Scoring – Azul then offers up 3 ways to earn bonus points. For every completed horizontal row in a Wall, 2 points are earned (of course at least one player must score this bonus if the game is to come to an end and it is possible to complete several horizontal rows in the final round).

For every completed vertical column in a Wall, 7 points are earned. These are harder to complete because it requires filling in the longer 4 and 5 box rows of the holding area and then targeting a single vertical column in your wall. You are doing very well to complete 2 or more vertical columns in a single game.

The final bonus is worth a whopping 10 points, and is awarded for every type of tile that features all 5 times in your Wall. Going for this bonus can often be at the expense of scoring the other bonuses, such is the challenge of dominating the taking of tiles of a single type.

The player with the highest score after the bonus points are awarded takes the win. In the event of a tie, the win goes to the tied player that has completed the more horizontal rows in their Wall. If this too is tied, the players share the win.

d10-8 Summary – I'll try something new here in an effort to summarise the flow of the game.

Take Tiles => Place them in your holding area

Complete rows in your holding area in order to add a tile to your Wall => Score higher points by adding tiles to form orthogonal chains

Try to complete rows and columns in your Wall and\or add 5 tiles of one type to your wall => Trigger bonus scoring


What drives the game is the rules for taking tiles, trying to collect what you need and leaving the opposition with tiles that may hinder their progress or even score them negative points.

Playing with the Variant

Image Courtesy of Toynan


The Variant form of play uses the side of the board with the greyed-out 'Wall' and the implications may be obvious. There is no given location for a tile of any type to go and that means the players are free to place tiles as they wish in any location, provided that a single tile type does not feature twice in any horizontal row or vertical column. This makes for more flexibility in the 'taking' of tiles in the short term.

What does it do to the game? Does it change it up much or at all? Of course it does to some degree and I've only played the game this way once. To me the variant was no more or less compelling. What it does do is brake up a player's strategy if they have a preferred way to play in the normal format (they tend to go after certain colours because of where they are located on the Wall), but it doesn't change that much.

I was hoping for a real game changer with the variant but I don't think it is.

The Final Word

Azul is another great design in its own right and a quality addition to the line of modern abstract designs released over the last 30 years. It is very much a puzzle and the challenge is to best assess the game-state as it changes and make the most of it. The tension comes from getting what you need before another players takes those tiles away from you. The game allows for forward planning but there is an element of luck too, in what tiles are available each round. That said, there are enough tiles drawn each round to usually provide you with some pretty good plays, even if they weren't the killer move you were aiming for. This is one of the great appeals of Azul, it allows its players to accomplish things and make them feel successful, even if another player is making slightly better progress (and that isn't always highly evident).

Another strength of Azul is that it can be played at effectively two speeds. It can be played at a more relaxed level with each player more or less selecting tiles for their own purposes and not worrying too much about the opposition. When playing like this all of the players feel like they are making good moves and accomplishing things as they complete rows and add tiles to their Wall. For the conflict averse, Azul can be a winner.

But Azul can be played at a higher level as well, allowing those that think their way through games to get better with experience. Playing more competitively requires a careful consideration of what tiles the opposition are looking for and the current state of their holding area rows. There is something quite satisfying about making plays that result in other players being forced to take more tiles than they really wanted or being left short of what they really needed. I'm not suggesting that Azul reaches any Chess like level, or even Hive for that matter, because this is not a perfect information game. You won't ever find yourself disliking the game because of a disparity in skill level. But it can and will reward the shrewd player more often than not.

If abstract games are not your thing I would encourage you to give Azul a try. The beauty here is that it is pretty difficult to screw other players over on a regular basis if they are paying attention. So what results is a game where positive outcomes outweigh the negative ones. It helps make the game feel inclusive and that will appeal to many a game player.

That is probably the biggest difference between Santorini (which I covered last year) or Hive and Azul. As much as I love Santorini, players can get that 'argh...I didn't see that move!' feeling. In Azul the players don't tend to mind the result at the end of the play, it's quite the relaxed gaming experience.

Another positive with Azul is that the margins for victory tend to be pretty tight (between the leading players at least) and the scoring system is such that the players are not quite sure who will come out on top in the final analysis. This helps all players to feel like they are in with a shot right to the end and it might only take 3-4 negative points to deny someone else the win and see you slip ahead. That's a pretty good positive for any game and it means that Azul can reward clever players without making anyone feel like they have been hammered mercilessly all game long.

At the heart of what makes Azul work as an experience though is the combination of tile collection rules and the scoring rules. Azul is a great example of an open design in that a player can go about scoring points in a number of different ways and do fairly well. There isn't only one strategy to secure victory and the players really need to assess the factory offerings each turn and assess the needs of their opponents if they want to secure the right tiles and score well...as often as possible.

The final feather in Azul's cap is the fact that it plays in a really nice length of time. It doesn't outstay its welcome and I suspect most groups play at least two games in a row once the game is off the shelf. It also plays really well at any play count. I actually find that there is a bit more 'tile pain' (being forced to take tiles you don't want or can't use) in the 2-player game than when playing with 3 or 4 players. But we are cracking out 2-player games in 15-20 minutes. At that length the reward to time investment is in the positive ledger for sure.

Azul is in my experience, the 3rd high-quality abstract game to make a big splash in the last 7 years, following on the heels of Indigo (2012), Onitama (2014) and Santorini (2016). It begs the question why abstract game designs are so popular at the moment? Is it a case of over-saturation of point-salad designs, euro cube-pushers and miniature heavy themed conflict games? Is it more the fact that people are finding rule-light, easy access, strategy-rich games desirable in this time-poor world we find ourselves in? I suspect it is more the later than the former but there is no doubt that abstract designs have really shone through since 2001 when Hive seemed to kickstart the genre again.

For me Azul is a great title that deserves a place in most game-fan's collections. I look forward to playing it for years to come and it is a versatile title that can appeal to family groups as much as it can with gaming circles.

'Til next we meet, be the tiler you know you were meant to be!


Image Courtesy of EchoOperative


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Review Links to Other Notable Abstract Games

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Qwirkle

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EDIT - Added the SdJ + DsP awards for 2018

EDIT - Added Sintra Review Link

EDIT - Added Onitama Review Link
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Andy Andersen
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Now that is one fine review
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Mark Morrise
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Thanks for your great review!
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Jerry Dziuba
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Neil Thomson wrote:

The Variant form...

Perhaps it is a little but more forgiving in that the same coloured tiles can be used in the same horizontal row.


This is incorrect. Same rules apply as in the base game.
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Curtis Frantz
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The 1st player tile has already been included in the current print run as well as future. If you buy the game form any online retailer today, you should get the 1st player tile.

Secondly, yes the publisher created some tiles to give out to 1st edition owners, but they ran out very, very quickly. So I don't think many early adopters will be able to get the individual tile at this point.

To re-state what the user above me noted, it's true that you can't copy the tile type in a vertical column OR horizontal row on the variant side of the board, but the rules did not make this as clear as they should have (we made the same mistake at first).

Edit: I also prefer the printed side of the board versus the variant. With the added flexibility on the variant side, it's very difficult to anticipate what other players need, reducing the amount of strategy in the game.
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Greg Darcy
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Read review.
Thinks: Oh no! I have been playing it wrong!

Neil Thomson wrote:
A player is only allowed to have tiles of a single type in each row. If a row has been started but is incomplete, it must be finished before that colour (tile type) can be used in another row. If they manage to complete a row with a given tile type, they are allowed to start a new row using that type of tile if they wish.

Let's look at an example. In the image on the right, a player has 2 empty spots in the blue tile row. If they were to take a set of 3 blue tiles they could complete the blue row and use the remaining tile to fill the top row as well.


Checks Rules...
Rules wrote:
Once all spaces of a pattern line are filled, that line is considered complete. If you have picked up more tiles than you can place in your chosen pattern line, you must place the excess tiles in the floor line (see Floor line).


Nope. The Neil has. Phew!

Also, I cannot see anything in the rules that says if I start a pattern line in a colour, I must complete that line before I can use that colour in a different line.
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Martin G
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GregDarcy wrote:
Read review.
Thinks: Oh no! I have been playing it wrong!

Neil Thomson wrote:
A player is only allowed to have tiles of a single type in each row. If a row has been started but is incomplete, it must be finished before that colour (tile type) can be used in another row. If they manage to complete a row with a given tile type, they are allowed to start a new row using that type of tile if they wish.

Let's look at an example. In the image on the right, a player has 2 empty spots in the blue tile row. If they were to take a set of 3 blue tiles they could complete the blue row and use the remaining tile to fill the top row as well.


Checks Rules...
Rules wrote:
Once all spaces of a pattern line are filled, that line is considered complete. If you have picked up more tiles than you can place in your chosen pattern line, you must place the excess tiles in the floor line (see Floor line).


Nope. The Neil has. Phew!

Also, I cannot see anything in the rules that says if I start a pattern line in a colour, I must complete that line before I can use that colour in a different line.


Yep, you are right. Back to the rule book Neil!
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Dr. Dam
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Nick Danger wrote:
Neil Thomson wrote:

The Variant form...

Perhaps it is a little but more forgiving in that the same coloured tiles can be used in the same horizontal row.


This is incorrect. Same rules apply as in the base game.


Thanks for the pick-up.

The English Rules are poorly written then in that section as they overtly state that the game remains the same. It then explicitly points out that no tile of the same type can appear more than once in a vertical line. This implies that the same isn't the case for horizontal lines.

Edit made.
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qwertymartin wrote:
GregDarcy wrote:
Read review.
Thinks: Oh no! I have been playing it wrong!

Neil Thomson wrote:
A player is only allowed to have tiles of a single type in each row. If a row has been started but is incomplete, it must be finished before that colour (tile type) can be used in another row. If they manage to complete a row with a given tile type, they are allowed to start a new row using that type of tile if they wish.

Let's look at an example. In the image on the right, a player has 2 empty spots in the blue tile row. If they were to take a set of 3 blue tiles they could complete the blue row and use the remaining tile to fill the top row as well.


Checks Rules...
Rules wrote:
Once all spaces of a pattern line are filled, that line is considered complete. If you have picked up more tiles than you can place in your chosen pattern line, you must place the excess tiles in the floor line (see Floor line).


Nope. The Neil has. Phew!

Also, I cannot see anything in the rules that says if I start a pattern line in a colour, I must complete that line before I can use that colour in a different line.


Yep, you are right. Back to the rule book Neil!


Dang it...of all the games...

We actually learned this one by watching a group at a Con and they taught us this rule. My partner then re-read the rules months later and re-taught me...keeping this non-rule in place (about not being able to start another line with a tile type that has a row incomplete).

This is one of the few reviews when I haven't read the rule book from start to finish myself...Got caught out. shake

Thanks for the pick-ups - review edited for accuracy.

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Ghorron
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Besides the already mentioned rules-mishaps, good review
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David B
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I agree on the player boards. The bare edges are going to show wear, particularly on the corners. I imagine I will end up reinforcing the corners with a dab of wood glue. But the cardboard stock they used for those boards also feels cheap and have shown to be vulnerable to warping. Though the boards have nice graphical design, their quality is not on par with the rest of the game.
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Bill Heaton
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At the board game cafe we run we spray games we know will get heavy use with a varnish. Doesn't help the corners but the board holds up incredibly well after hundreds of plays already.
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Thank you for the nice review! It's great to see an in-depth text review.
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Jon Wooden
United Kingdom
Isleworth
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Awesome review.

26/05/18 - YNWA
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Tweedel Di
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Your review is so good that it nudged me to buy this game, even though it repulsed me at first. The game that is.

Great work!
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Dr. Dam
Australia
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alexandrehamelin wrote:
Your review is so good that it nudged me to buy this game, even though it repulsed me at first. The game that is.

Great work!


Hmm...no pressure...goo

I hope you really like it and thanks for reading.
 
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Dr. Dam
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EDIT - Added the SdJ + DsP awards for 2018
 
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