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Subject: Can be my "Dice" a game changer? rss

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Aleksandr Omelyanov
Ukraine
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Hello BGG Users

I’m developing “Dice” - a pair of cubes with a built-in electronic unit and a transmitter that transmits the dropped combination to the app installed on the phone, tablet, computer - any device with bluetooth on which you can install the app. Any "board game" in which virtual dice used to be used can now be supplemented with "real" dice, which you throw yourself and the result depends on you, and not on the random number generator in the computer. There is an opportunity to play with an opponent who is on-line, built-in sensors do not allow "cheating" and distinguish this roll from "fraud".

I want to solve the problem, when playing with a bot or another player, the player will depend on the incomprehensible algorithm of dropping the cubes, which is controlled by the computer. We found many complaints in the comments and reviews on games with the dice, that the bot always has better chances and the computer plays along. Now everything will be in the hands of the player, now he controls and throws a combination for the bot - probability theory and randomness remain, but the player is sure that no one deceives him.

At the moment, it is critically important for us to know the opinion of real players. Do you need such cubes? Are you ready to pay the money ($ 50) for such cubes and independently influence the result of the combination after throwing the dice?

Many thanks in advance.
Aleks
 
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John
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I'm happy with computer generated randomness (or psuedorandomness) when playing on an app, and with regular dice when playing a physical game. I'd hope that the programmers could get the randomness good enough. I know of at least one app where something was less random than it should have been - the "Cutter Conspiracy" in the Star Realms app which lead to a certain card appearing more often than it should at the start of the game, but in general I'll assume if I lose it's because I'm worse at the game than the AI, rather than because the AI cheats by getting more 6s (or whatever).

Rolling a pair of physical dice and seeing the same number come up on my phone would be a neat gimmick but not something I'd pay $50 for. Some people might though.

Possible problems:

1. Some games use more than 2 dice, in some case far more than two dice.

2. Can it handle custom dice? I don't see why it shouldn't with a mapping though obviously the experience wouldn't be quite so slick (unless you could find a way of changing the physical dice too)

3. If I have the official Catan app installed on my phone I'm assuming it won't work with your dice without whoever develops the Catan app modifying their code to allow your dice to be used. Without that then they risk being just a gimmick.

4. Not all dice have 6 sides.

P.S. You've got "daisies" twice in your post where I assume you mean "dice".
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John
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aleksproua wrote:
built-in sensors do not allow "cheating" and distinguish this roll from "fraud".


So you can detect that the dice have actually been rolled properly and not adjusted afterwards? That's neat! Not something I usually worry about but...
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Luke Denby
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One hurdle I imagine is many games that use virtual dice wouldn't allow for outside inputs to determine the results.

So say I'm playing Settler of Catan online. There is no way I'd be able to override then games dice rolling options and input my own.

While I'm sure this could be interesting in things like tabletop simulator or board games played via something like skype it seems very niche.

It could be used for role playing games as well as it's getting more common for people to role play remotely. That said those games ofte use a lot more than a standard six sided die. I'd imagine a D20 would be pretty complicated and even more expensive.
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Jeff Saxton
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So these new dice will somehow have what amounts to a tiny transmitter inside them. Now you've got the problem of balancing those dice so they are still fair, and not somehow affected by imbalance from internal batteries, a chip, voids, etc.

Seems to me the problems occasionally associated with a random number generator would be far less than the possibly imbalanced dice.
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Aleksandr Omelyanov
Ukraine
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Thank you very much John for your respond and for all your useful questions.

1)At the moment we are thinking about games where are 2 dice. But it's definitely worth to think about games where are more than 2.

2)I would say no.

3 I also think about alternative way jf distribution of dice - collaboration with someone big in game creation where they can use my api and players can play game in a new way.

Thank you very much one more time.
 
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Mike Vande Ven Jr.
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Another thing to charge, even if it's inductive charging, is a real turn off to me.

This could be cool for people running youtube game sessions, or tournaments, or something like that where displaying the result of the roll to an audience to be useful. Beyond that, I don't see much of a need.
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Bill Cook
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I think it would be really cool to have dice you roll and transmit the roll to a iphone app.

But $50 is probably way (way!) too much for people to pay.

Bummer.
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John
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giantmike wrote:
This could be cool for people running youtube game sessions, or tournaments, or something like that where displaying the result of the roll to an audience to be useful. Beyond that, I don't see much of a need.


Neat idea.

Mack_me_Bucko wrote:
the possibly imbalanced dice.


Of course. And testing to see if there are balanced is no easy task - I'm not sure how many rolls it'd need to check but I'm fairly sure it's lots!
 
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John "Omega" Williams
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Electronic dice have been around a while. Moreso as the tech has gotten small enough to fit in a die that isnt oversized. Someone else last year was showcasing minis and a board that were electronic and used an app. The minis stats and health were transmitted to the app and updated during gameplay. The board/mat also powered or charged the minis I believe and terrain features could be set and also tracked with an app.

Main hurdles are these.

1: Many players really do not want to be tied to a piece of tech to play a game. Various reasons for this.

2: App based games are notoriously ephemeral. We have in the last few years seen some apps come, and go, in less than a year. Some lasting longer. But the underlying problem is that the game or widget may become essentially a paperweight if/when the app vanishes. Oft an expensive paperweight.

3: possible fragility is one other problem. Your electronics will have to be ruthlessly shock resistant.
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John
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Omega2064 wrote:
But the underlying problem is that the game or widget may become essentially a paperweight if/when the app vanishes. Oft an expensive paperweight.

Yes, if you make it open source then you can reduce the impact since someone else can take over.

Omega2064 wrote:
3: possible fragility is one other problem. Your electronics will have to be ruthlessly shock resistant.

Indeed. Electronics don't like being dropped. I've soldered components back onto a USB flash drive twice after it was dropped (probably 10 years ago). Amazingly it worked afterwards, I didn't think my soldering was that good!

Unless your failure rate is really low it could kill the product, someone who buys one of these and has it fail is fairly likely to complain online unless your customer service is excellent. Well some people will complain even if it is...
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