Recommend
25 
 Thumb up
 Hide
8 Posts

Battle for Germany» Forums » Sessions

Subject: AAR with pics rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Phil Goyette
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
Like so many others, when I learned about the depth of the boardgame hobby I went overboard and bought a ton of games I'd never play. A recent move across the Atlantic forced me to cull my game collection by about 50%. Still, there is a stack of games, several of which are still unplayed, residing in the corner of the closet of our office. Therefore, I will play all my games, starting from the top of the pile and ending at the bottom!

The game on the top of my pile was SPIs 1975 hex and counter classic, The Battle for Germany. I picked up a used ziploc version of the game for about $10 off eBay. From reviewing the components and setting up, I don't think the game was ever played. So this artifact has been riding around in a ziploc bag, untouched, for approximately 43 years. Pretty wild when you stop and think about it.



Set-up, learning rules, and playing through the first 3 turns of the game took me about 1.5 hours. Here's the situation at the end of T1:




By the end of T2 the Allies had crossed the Rhine in the south, but it would ultimately not lead anywhere as the Germans were effective at bottling up that sector. In the east, the Germans were already working to reform their lines:



End of T3. Soviet ARM across the Vistula, Warsaw, Budapest, Yugoslavia ‘liberated’. Allies lose foothold across the Rhine in the south, but US ARM pushing forward in Belgium with eyes in Hannover, Bremen.



T4 (Feb ‘45) Soviet Front (approx 300,000 troops) on the loose south of the Vistula, 8 hexes to Berlin...


End of T5. Trouble in the east. Germans in the East have been reduced to 7 counters, Soviets nearly running rampant.



nd of T6 (March ‘45). Berlin will fall soon. In the east, conscription of school children and old men in full force. In West, 20th Armored can drive to Berlin this turn if unchecked.



End T7. Next stop Berlin and points west. Germans can't stop anything at this point, but this setup and the sequence of play means it will be 2 more turns before the Soviets grab Berlin. Allies are pushing it in the West, attacking everywhere.



End of T8 (April ‘45). Allies and Soviets stare at each other across the abyss. With Berlin about to fall, I decided to try out 'Additional Special Rule' 13.6, which elimiates all remaining German units and lets the Allies and Soviets attack each other. 'Patton's Fantasy' scenario.



End T9. First battles between Allied and Soviet forces. Allied armor advances quickly and crosses Elbe with eyes on taking Berlin from the commies.



WRAP: After initial exchanges, Soviet and Allied leadership meets to negotiate cease-fire. Cold War begins in earnest in May of ‘45. West gains concessions in some places east of the Elbe, but Soviets control Berlin....

I played poorly as the Soviets in the initial 'Patton's Fantasy' turn (ran ahead and tried to grab VP cities instead of building lines), and the Allied ARM made them pay. I think if I kept playing the scenario out, the US would have pushed the Soviets back from everywhere that wasn't held by the 8-20 Front units due to the superior quality and quantity of the Allied armor. I think the Soviets best play is to try and hold onto the Elbe, using the 8-20s as anchors.

I played poorly as the east Germans early on. I tried to make a stand everywhere and wound up making a stand nowhere. I think the Germans need to try and make the move across the Vistula as costly as possible, because after that there is no defensible territory to hold onto between the Soviets and Berlin. As the Soviets, I followed the tips in the rulebook and attacked with everyone every turn, trying to get off 1 or 2 4:1 attacks when I could. As the Allies, I was a little too cautious out of the gate giving the Soviets the upper hand in the race to Berlin. But I think if the Soviets are slowed a bit, the Americans can 'take the lid off' the German defenses and push through the low countries with their armor.

A classic game. I can see why it’s always so highly recommended as introductory hex & counter fare. Will be keeping this one in the collection. However, it's going to be a while before I play it!

Next, I tackle something completely different, GMT's Labyrinth with the Awakening Expansion. So shifting from classic, basic hex and counter with CRT to a CDG area control game.
35 
 Thumb up
3.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lee Troutman
United States
Bowie
Maryland
flag msg tools
badge
I am called Huginn..., or is it Muninn..., I forget...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I noticed you didn't mention the Italian Theater...whistle

Seriously though, great AAR on a treasured (by me anyway) old warhorse. One of the few SPI games from that era that I still dust off and play every now and then.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Barry Kendall
United States
Lebanon
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb

Seriously though, great AAR on a treasured (by me anyway) old warhorse. One of the few SPI games from that era that I still dust off and play every now and then. [/q]

Agreed. This game was very well conceived and executed. I've played it many a time solo and still enjoy it.

The idea also gave rise to a number of other "east-west" play-both-sides-somewhere designs (even DG's "1863!") and the drama of the '44-'45 situation makes for some great scenarios in games such as "Mighty Endeavor II" and "Liberty/Victory Roads."

Good report (and thanks for the photos!).
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bill Eldard
United States
Burke
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Barry Kendall wrote:
Quote:

Seriously though, great AAR on a treasured (by me anyway) old warhorse. One of the few SPI games from that era that I still dust off and play every now and then.


Agreed. This game was very well conceived and executed. I've played it many a time solo and still enjoy it.

The idea also gave rise to a number of other "east-west" play-both-sides-somewhere designs (even DG's "1863!") and the drama of the '44-'45 situation makes for some great scenarios in games such as "Mighty Endeavor II" and "Liberty/Victory Roads."

Good report (and thanks for the photos!).

It's a perfect game for teaching newcomers since they experience both offensive and defensive situations simultaneously.

I remember getting my copy in S&T back in the mid-'70s while stationed in West Germany, and I recall it as being the wargame I played most during the time.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Terry Lewis
United States
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great to see an old classic taken out for a spin!!

Still have my copy from 43 years ago!!
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim Fardette
United States
Lawrenceville
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice to see this hit the table. Maybe I will be inspired to dust my old copy off...
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Shockley
United States
Seffner
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice AAR! I recently played this for the first time, and was impressed. It achieves a perfect chemistry of historicity, balance, and playability. It was just plain FUN, and I felt like I had, in some way, "experienced" the battle.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phil Goyette
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
Thanks for the nice feedback everyone. Putting the AAR with pics into BGG was kind of a chore (I'm just noticing now that a couple of the pics are wrong...) but the feedback has encouraged me to keep it up for my next playthrough.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.