Magister Ludi
Australia
Fremantle
Western Australia
flag msg tools
Roll low!
badge
You are a paradox to me, a contradiction You're a predicament for me, and a prediction
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Planning for this game took place a few weeks ago and actual play was at our scheduled monthly wargame meet in Perth, Western Australia on Sunday July 8th.

The expanded game requires almost all modules to be owned which is one thing (for instance you need to own the Spanish expansion simply to get the four French Guard cavalry blocks….shades of the FFG business model!) along with extended set up time which makes the overall rating on this expansion a little lower than the base game for me.

Nonetheless, the opportunity to play a multiplayer game on at WAW day was too good to pass up.



The practice set up at home, ably assisted by my nine year old.


After reviewing the scenario card I was sceptical that it would allow a recreation of Austrerlitz as the terrain and general set up of forces looked ahistorical.



Reference to a map of the battle indicated that the orientation was in fact correct and our replay was very much along historical lines.





General scheme of the battlefield from Chandler.


As in the actual battle, initial allied efforts were aimed towards the French right wing. This is recreated in the scenario by having three victory point locations here (The Castle and villages of Sokolnitz and Telnitz).


After some player attrition, the starting gamers were Greg as allied CIC (Call me Emperor Franz..), Jacob as sub commander and Russophile and on the French side, Mike as Bessieres and General responsible for the left wing including all those chunky French Imperial Guard units, and me as French CIC.

After about 30 minutes of set up, the game commenced at 10-30am. The struggle would last for the next five and a half hours…truly Epic!




In a previous practice game with Greg, the Allies had drawn three forced march cards in quick succession which allowed them to bring almost overwhelming strength to bear against the French defenders in Teklnitz and Sokolonitz. This time the Allies weren’t so fortunate and their reserves were slower to move into action in this sector. Even so, there was to be almost continuous action in this flank for the whole game.

Telnitz eventually fell to the Allies and the French fell back, but were able to use light infantry ad artillery fire to take a steady toll of the Allies.




Action at Telnitz, with the French counterattack in progress.


Towards the mid game a determined assault by a number of Russian grenadier units threw the French out of the castle and they advanced into the position to find themselves faced with point blank fire from French artillery and a number of infantry units. The French counterattack was successful when they played a sapper card from their tactics deck, which meant no defensive terrain benefit. By the end of the battle, the brave Russian Grenadiers had been almost wiped out to a man.

In the centre of the battlefield, there is some incentive for a French advance to capture victory banner objectives comprising four hexes of the ‘Stare Vinohardy’ and the Pratzen Heights. The French pushed forward here and there was a continuing series of battles over the village of Pratzen.




The Russians about to receive a combined arms attack from the French. The round token means the unit has been reinforced to full strength under the ‘Mother Russia’ rule.


The Allies also moved up the massive five block Austrian Line infantry units on the heights overlooking the village and vineyard in the centre and proved very effective in fire attacks which generally held the French at bay here until the end game.

On the Allied right flank, the huge mass of Russians bestirred themselves into action, and the most fearsome unit, the six block Russian Guard cavalry unit ( which could roll up to seven dice normally) eventually thundered into action.



Charge of the Russian guard, with Grand Duke Constantine at their head.



It was this unit that checked the French in this area for a number of turns, with three French units being forced into square at one point and at the mercy of massed musketry and artillery fire. Squares also limit the number of command cards you hold in play.




Eventually the French saw their chance at moved up their own mass of cavalry to counterattack. I always find cavalry to be the decisive arm in battle, particularly if used en masse. The French launched the Heavy Guard Grenadiers (The Big Boots) along with another Heavy cavalry unit and the Cuirassiers against the Russian Guard cavalry and these were able to smash them down to a single block. Another blow to the Allies was the death of the Guard Commander Constantine from two sabre blows at the same time. As Napoleon was later to remark there would be a mass of unhappy ladies in St Petersburg after the battle…



French Horse Grenadiers, nicknamed the ‘Gods’ or the ‘Big Boots’ after the charge.



The overall victory banner count (with 19 needed for outright victory) had been running almost neck a neck up to this point, and at this late stage of the battle was around 14 each.

With the end game in sight, both sides commenced a series of desperation attacks with the aim to inflict as many casualties as possible. The last major Allied offensive which took place along the entire line had the potential to reap four banners, but I recall this was a bit of a turning point, with only one block destroyed. The French at this juncture had crept up to 18 blocks to the Allies 15 and they greedily cast their eyes towards the hapless allied units of one or two blocks in search of the final banner…

A lone Russian infantry unit holed up in the village of Krug (extreme end of the Allied right) was targeted by the French and light infantry fire was successful in inflicting the deadly shot. At the same time, French cavalry smashed an Austrian heavy cavalry unit in the centre, along with Russian Horse artillery stationed on Stare Vinohardy which dropped the Allied banner count to 13.




General Rapp: (gesturing back towards the flag). There’s the 19th banner Boss!
Napoleon: Sweet!!


The final tally did not really show how hard fought the battle had been. At 4pm the sounds of battle finally died away….all players I think had had an enjoyable time, so an Epic scenario will most likely appear at a future meet. I think that two a side is probably the optimum number of players, although up to four can be accommodated. The use of the game module ‘Generals, Marshals & Tacticians’ is in my opinion essential as it adds an expanded command deck and tactics cards, which add an additional layer of complexity, but also assist in giving the base game a more authentic feel of Napoleonic battle tactics. Both sides used these cards to good effect at various times.
27 
 Thumb up
5.55
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mattias Elfström
Sweden
Unspecified
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great report!

Can I join next time?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark McG
Australia
Penshurst
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
wish I could have played, and I'm only 2000 km away
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Townsend
Italy
Roma
Lazio
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Does the scenario represent the famous fog in some manner? I saw a miniatures version of this recently and the simple expedient was ALOT of cotton wool.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Magister Ludi
Australia
Fremantle
Western Australia
flag msg tools
Roll low!
badge
You are a paradox to me, a contradiction You're a predicament for me, and a prediction
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Not with a specific scenario rule, but I think the Allied hand of four cards compared to the six held by the French gives the right feel for the different qualities of each side.

I was pleasantly surprised at how the game narrative followed the actual battle however...it there was fog and beffudlement it was in the players brains after a lengthy day of play, although the time passed by pleasantly.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom H
Australia
flag msg tools
badge
Basil Hilder KIA Lone Pine, Gallipoli
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great report. Thanks. 😀
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Daglish
United Kingdom
Cheadle
Cheshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This is the experience that trumps the best of Commands & Colors: Ancients, buuut I haven't heard of a French loss, nor a play of the other one.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Magister Ludi
Australia
Fremantle
Western Australia
flag msg tools
Roll low!
badge
You are a paradox to me, a contradiction You're a predicament for me, and a prediction
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It was pretty close at one point and if a series of rolls had gone their way the Allied could have pulled off a win.

I'll probably pick a smaller scenario for further plays of Epic...practice set up to make sure I had all the bits took almost as long as the actual game!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark McG
Australia
Penshurst
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
aforandy wrote:
This is the experience that trumps the best of Commands & Colors: Ancients, buuut I haven't heard of a French loss, nor a play of the other one.


according the CCN.net, after 36 plays it is 56% French wins
https://www.commandsandcolors.net/napoleonics/maps/third-coa...

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tyler Gingrich
United States
Hilliard
Ohio
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
aforandy wrote:
This is the experience that trumps the best of Commands & Colors: Ancients, buuut I haven't heard of a French loss, nor a play of the other one.


We played 2 sessions of this scenario 2 players on a side at CABS last winter (sides flipped for the rematch). The French lost both times 15-19.

Here is my AAR from the rematch: Epic Austerlitz - AAR. I didn't think to do an AAR for the first one.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
clay stretch
United States
louisville
Kentucky
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
I just did austerlitz on my epic grid “ pimp my game” project I finished.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.