Recommend
17 
 Thumb up
 Hide
18 Posts

Ultimate Werewolf Legacy» Forums » General

Subject: My Top 15 Tips for a Successful Campaign (Spoiler Free) rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Chris Wray
United States
Harrisonville
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm in love with this game. I've been both a player and a moderator, and so far I think UWL is the single best social deduction game I've played.

The game gets a wider release in a few days, so I wanted to share some tips for a successful campaign. Here are my top 15 tips, organized by when they apply. I've tried to keep this spoiler free.

Before the First Game
1. Make sure that the moderator reads the "Getting Started Guide & Rules." Even if you are highly experienced with Ultimate Werewolf, some things are quite different here. In particular, I'd read the "House Rules" section on Pg. 4.
2. Make sure you've got a good space for this. I've played in a couple of different settings, and my favorite set up was 5 tables arranged in a pentagon shape, one "family" per table. It is also helpful if there's space for the moderator to walk around the village (as sometimes you have to change out their cards or tap them on a shoulder).
3. Get some card sleeves with an opaque side. Before you hand out the role cards, put them backwards in the sleeve, so the role faces the opaque side. This helps in two ways (a) it prevents re-deals or mis-plays where people accidentally flip over their card, and (b) since you generally don't reveal if you die at night, it means players don't flip their card over in some rash action.
4. I knew I was going to be the moderator for at least the first couple of sessions, so I read those parts at least a few nights before. That proved extremely helpful.
5. Check the errata, which can be found here:
https://beziergames.com/products/ultimate-werewolf-legacy
6. Plan on an hour per game. It didn't take us that long --- with stickers, breaks, etc. we only took 45 minutes on average --- but it isn't fun to be rushed.
7. Bring pens for everybody, or at least one per family. People get really excited to fill out their character cards, and competition for pens isn't fun for anybody.

As the campaign starts...
8. Read all of the flavor text. To be blunt, I generally hate flavor text in games, often skipping it or going "blah blah blah" while my game group rolls their eyes. The flavor text here, however, is excellent, and it actually helps clarify rules and guide the campaign.
9. Do the prelude. I had heard you could skip it, but I don't recommend that at all. It really gets everybody in gear for the first game, and as a moderator, it really helped me understand the layout of the diary.
10. As the moderator, if new titles, roles, or tokens come out, make sure to read the reference guide for those new parts before you unleash them in the village. It really helped me answer questions, and not everything you need (or want) to know is necessarily in the diary.
11. Use a timer. I don't normally moderate with a timer, instead preferring to let the village move at their own pace, but it helps out here, and I agree with the rulebook that it is a requirement. Players tend to get side tracked discussing some of the legacy aspects of the campaign, and the timer keeps things moving along.

The rules you (or the players) are likely to forget...
12. Roles are revealed if players die during the day, but generally not if they die at night.
13. Make sure to follow the token rules carefully: many of them have detailed use notes in the Reference Guide. In particular, we had early misunderstandings about the Ivory Tower (it means you cannot be eliminated first in the session, regardless of whether that is day or night).
14. Study the end conditions of each game carefully, particularly in Chapter 2.
15. A lot of the text/actions at the end of a chapter happen immediately following the game, not at the start of the next game, so have the village wrap up business before they take a break.

Enjoy the campaign! As I play with more groups, I'll try to update my recommendations here!
30 
 Thumb up
7.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Lingwall
United States
Kirksville
MO
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great advice.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phoebe Wild
Australia
South Melbourne
VIC
flag msg tools
publisher
Cardboard Vault Reviews!
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
Thanks for sharing these tips, Chris!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jesse Chapman
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Any thoughts on what the best player count is for the game? Often the min or max isn't.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Wray
United States
Harrisonville
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
waitreally wrote:
Any thoughts on what the best player count is for the game? Often the min or max isn't.

I'd guess, including the moderator, 11-16 is best. Players are organized into five families, and I think it'd be best if you had at least two players on a family. Plus, Werewolf has always worked better with more players.

I think we only had 11 when I played a few months ago, and the game worked well. We had more in my recent games, and it was good too.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jesse Chapman
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey, Chris. What is the advantage of having tables? I'm down to try this, but it's a much more cumbersome process. I was thinking about playing outside with chairs in a circle around a bonfire. I could do the tables too, but am curious what your other play types were like and what the tables add.

Thanks!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Wray
United States
Harrisonville
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
waitreally wrote:
Hey, Chris. What is the advantage of having tables? I'm down to try this, but it's a much more cumbersome process. I was thinking about playing outside with chairs in a circle around a bonfire. I could do the tables too, but am curious what your other play types were like and what the tables add.

Thanks!

I suppose there's not a real need for tables. We used them primarily for food and drink, which is a lot of folks will want if you settle in for the campaign.

Game component wise, people each have their role card, their family card (which is helpful to display later in the campaign), and maybe a few tokens, but that isn't really enough to mean you have to have a table.

If you're going to forgo tables, I'd still have one for the moderator, and I'd definitely sleeve the cards (although I recommend that either way).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Hudson
United States
Mountain View
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I agree with everything but one thing that helped me was in regards to sleeves.

I put the cards in so the role is visible and when they are looking at their role, I have them reverse the card. One player wasn't paying attention and thought the back was the front so he thought he was a werewolf, which skewed the preface a lot since there was now one more werewolf than expected. It also allows the players to read the text at the bottom of the card so they can read again what their role is.

Another benefit that was helpful for me as moderator was that I could very easily see that I had the correct cards in my hand before dealing them out. When they were in backwards, it was a challenge to identify them and keep track of them all.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jesse Chapman
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Chris, or anyone... do you guys tell people the win conditions for the session? For example in 1692 there is a new win condition and it would be helpful for the villagers to know this, I think... but maybe it's more fun if they just find out?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Myers
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
waitreally wrote:
Chris, or anyone... do you guys tell people the win conditions for the session? For example in 1692 there is a new win condition and it would be helpful for the villagers to know this, I think... but maybe it's more fun if they just find out?
Well, it's still a game, and I still need to know what I'm trying to accomplish. Some of the "Chapter 2" content needs someone to know what they are doing. And knowing a person has a specific thing means they cannot be some other thing, which means their objectives are now questionable, which means I need to know what they were trying to do, which means I need to know the win condition.

So yes, in probably every case, as a villager, I need to know the win condition.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Wray
United States
Harrisonville
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
waitreally wrote:
Chris, or anyone... do you guys tell people the win conditions for the session? For example in 1692 there is a new win condition and it would be helpful for the villagers to know this, I think... but maybe it's more fun if they just find out?

Yes, I would always read them the win conditions. And knowing I was reading from the script, the village always felt comfortable asking me to repeat it later, and I think that helped clarify things quite a bit. Especially in Chapter 2.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sarah Trager
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey, thanks! I'm planning a to run the entire campaign as a one-shot. How much time do you suggest? I'm thinking that in between each game we'll take probably 15-20 minute breaks.

S
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Wray
United States
Harrisonville
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sarahmtrager wrote:
Hey, thanks! I'm planning a to run the entire campaign as a one-shot. How much time do you suggest? I'm thinking that in between each game we'll take probably 15-20 minute breaks.

S

Oh gosh, that will surely take all day. My KC group played from 12-7 the first day, then 12-6 the second day, and we didn't take very long breaks. So that was 13 hours total?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathon Tonkin
Australia
Adelaide
South Australia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
Do the families need to be randomised as well or can friends group together in the different families?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Myers
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Tonkinjo wrote:
Do the families need to be randomised as well or can friends group together in the different families?

fFamilies don't need to be randomized, no, but it would probably be more interesting if people did not sit next to their usual partners. This is up to you.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marcus Round
Australia
flag msg tools
hi which sleeves do you recommend?
thank you

Edit: Nevermind, it's in the big list - https://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/164572/item/6352481#item6...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean F
United States
Puyallup
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
RIP Rutger
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
chriswray84 wrote:
sarahmtrager wrote:
Hey, thanks! I'm planning a to run the entire campaign as a one-shot. How much time do you suggest? I'm thinking that in between each game we'll take probably 15-20 minute breaks.

S

Oh gosh, that will surely take all day. My KC group played from 12-7 the first day, then 12-6 the second day, and we didn't take very long breaks. So that was 13 hours total?
Keeping an 11 person group together for 13 hours over two days? And you say you've done this with 2 different groups? I'm both impressed and bewildered.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kallipygian
United States
California
flag msg tools
Much appreciated! Going to play this with my group in a couple days.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls