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The Texsun
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Imagine a world where the Germans and Japanese win World War II. Pretty horrific idea, but an excellent one for the premise of a board game. I believe Ty Bomba produced this one, if I'm not mistaken.

In TtW, a two-player game, the Germans face off against the Japanese. Both roughly have an equal share of the world, which is divided up into interesting little bits (i.e. "Azad Hind" is the bit of northwestern India occupied by Germany, while most of South America is under Japanese control and called the "Greater South American Co-Prosperity Sphere"). The map artwork is nice but comes across more as a Rand McNally game than as a wargame. But that is something one can grow used to.

Movement is regulated by dots, and the dots are color-coded depending on their terrain. Each terrain type has a stacking limitation which is ONLY enforcable in two instances: one, at the end of the player's Movement phase, or two, when combat interception ensues. You see, the enemy player can intercept any ground movement through a dot if they have troops in an adjacent dot. If they choose to ambush your stack of troops in a mountain dot, for example, which I believe has a stack limit of 3 units (for either side), and your stack has 8, before combat even begins you lose 5 units! This makes for careful movement.

Overall, I think the game is stacked against the Germans. While Germany has many more armored units, the Japanese have more units, period. The Japs can then cover every front and do it well, while the Germans will have some hard choices to make about where to concentrate. If the Germans spread themselves too thin, they're meat for the Japanese.

The Germans will especially be hard pressed in Asia and America. In Asia, the frontage is huge. In America, in every game I played the Japs did their utmost to root out the Germans from there, as there's a high concentration of industry dots in the American Northeast (German territory). The Germans cannot afford to overlook this part of the world, but then again they desperately need their troops concentrated in order to have any chance for a knockout blow against the Japanese. Africa and South America are potential fronts as well, but tend to be resource drains on Germany.

Add to this mix rebels (the UN) and A-bombs, and you've got a heck of a ride in store for you. Games usually last a couple of hours. By that point it's obvious who's going to win, and most games are given up by concession rather than fighting to the bitter end, the last unit and the last breath.

Overall it's a great change-of-pace game that challenges your management ability.
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Andrew Prizzi
United States
West Newton
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How complex of a wargame is it? Where would you place it on the old AH 1-10 scale? How does combat work, CRT, bucket of dice, etc? Thanks.
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The Texsun
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prizziap wrote:
How complex of a wargame is it? Where would you place it on the old AH 1-10 scale? How does combat work, CRT, bucket of dice, etc? Thanks.


Hi prizziap...hopefully this is better late than never.

It's not a complicated game at all. If I were to use the old AH scale, I'd say it's a 3, 4 tops.

Combat is very simple. All units are taken off board (with the dot where the combat takes place marked with, as the rules suggest, a dime), and lined up. The attacking player rolls a 10-sided die for each unit they are using, and must roll equal to or below a unit's Attack value in order to score a hit. The attacker chooses which enemy unit they fire on. If a hit is scored, the attacked unit is rotated 180 degrees. The attacker, if they have more units than the defender, can 'gang up' on individual pieces if they want to. Once the attacker is done, the defender then rolls a 10-sided die for each of their units (including the 'hit' ones), and must roll equal to or less than the defending unit's Defense value. If they hit (the defender chooses which units they attack), the attacking unit is rotated 180 degrees. Once all fire combat is resolved for both sides, rotated units are flipped over to their depleted side; if a unit is already depleted or is only a 1-step unit, it is eliminated.

A battle can last longer than just one round; each player can bring in reinforcements from adjacent dots (any and all adjacent dots in which they have units). Retreats can be conducted at any point without retaliation, although airdropped units cannot retreat.

There is also extensive rules on combat support and combat modifiers - terrain, fortifications, invasions, Banzai chargers, naval gun support, air support, Kamikazes, special support units (like the German King Lion Corps and 11th Flieger Corps, and the Japanese Imperial Rocket Corps) to add to combat values...there's also rules for fleet-to-fleet sea combat, air support, and more.

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