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Board Game: Advanced Squad Leader
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Subject: A History of Deluxe ASL rss

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Fen Yan
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Deluxe Advanced Squad Leader, the “bigger hex” version of Advanced Squad Leader, was one of the early variants of ASL. Viewed as a commercial failure five years after its inception, it endured due to having several fun and memorable scenarios.

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Zerosum

As of this day, DASL has at least 168 scenarios online or in print ranging from unformatted playtest versions all the way up to official classics on yellowed cardstock. In this post I will present a year-by-year summary of scenario publication and key events along with commentary about important issues regarding DASL.

I will also call out “recommended” scenarios; these are DASL scenarios that have been singled out as particularly good or fun by one or more posters in various online forum threads.

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Original_CorPse

Deluxe ASL first appeared in 1985, the same year as the release of the ASL rulebook and core module Beyond Valor. Deluxe ASL Module 1, Streets of Fire had the theme of city fights on the Russian front. The module came with map boards a-d and 10 scenarios. Rules pages J1-J6 were already in the main rulebook. The main rules differences from standard ASL included Hand-to-Hand in melee, Wall Advantage, Residual in Bypass, single-story houses and bombardment. One can argue that the DASL Wall Advantage and Residual rules (made possible by the larger hex size) are more realistic than their counterparts in the standard rules.

Only about two of the Chapter J pages had actual rules; the rest were a primer on painting miniatures along with two full-page ads featuring GHQ micro armour. Years later these ASL-branded GHQ micro armour packs could still be seen hanging on the racks of hobby stores.

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by TiNYTimIDFluffYBunnY

Also, a set of Russian and German AFV cards were included. Their purpose was to facilitate the use of miniature models by providing:
1) A place for armor information markers to reduce clutter on the map) and
2) Counter stats printed on the AFV card because the AFV counter would be replaced by a miniature model.
With most players not using miniatures, and table space often at a premium, the AFV card concept did not see much use.

Most noticeably, the big hexes, each about 2-1/8 inches across, were made to accommodate the micro armour 1/285th scale.

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Chigurgh

Bruce Probst comments on this attempt to introduce miniatures into the ASL world:

“It is the opinion of many (including myself) that this attempt to make DASL a ‘miniatures game’ turned off (and/or confused) many regular ASL players, dooming the DASL modules to relatively poor sales. The realisation that DASL could be played perfectly well without miniatures, and the recognition of the type of ASL gaming that it offered only came later and over time, leading to its slow-but-steady increase in popularity.”

What type of ASL gaming was Probst referring to? This combination of smaller map area and larger hexes was geared towards scenarios with large force densities, explained in his December 2017 post on BoardGameGeek:

“Just to be pedantic ... anyone who believes that DASL is just "the hexes are big so you can stack counters more easily" is not really grasping the essence of it. Yes, certainly, big roomy hexes are a part of it, and most ASL experiences are improved with bigger hexes (if you have the space for it) because physically stacking cardboard counters is one of those headaches we all have to put up with. The point of DASL though ... the core philosophy of it, if you will ... is the type of actions that it best portrays. Very close-up, very intense, yet still very big situations. It would be ideal for many dense jungle type situations (if we had DASL boards that portrayed the terrain) -- failing that, we're left with the intense city actions and bocage actions that the existing boards give us. If your regular, every day ASL scenario design takes place on a single geomorphic board (or equivalent area) then it might be a good candidate for a DASL scenario. If it's much less than a single board, it very likely would be a good candidate for DASL -- available boards permitting! On the other hand, if it only features a handful of units on either side, it would probably be pointless as a DASL scenario (even though it would "work" perfectly well).”

Not surprisingly, eight of the 10 scenarios in Streets of Fire (with their high unit counts) clock in at over 10 hours playtime using the Alpenfestung Scenario Playing Time Calculator.

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Inkygirl

With the observation that four DASL map boards put together would nearly equal the hex area of just one standard ASL geomorphic map board, some detractors stated that DASL lacked room for maneuver. However in over a dozen plays of DASL I’ve not noticed this as a problem. ‘Ol Fezziweg of Gamesquad put it well several years ago: “a relative thing. DASL scenarios do not purport to be sweeping examples of maneuver warfare, they attempt to show bitter, close range combat over a limited area. In this, it excels. However, there are scenarios where maneuver is a key element of the scenario; The Good Shepherd comes to mind as one, as does The Mailed Fist. Neither could be mistaken in any way for a desert scenario or one on the steppes, but neither are they straight-ahead slugfests. Ultimately, the success or failure of the DASL medium devolves upon the scenarios designed for it; I, for one, think the majority of them are highly enjoyable.”

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Scrub

All but one of the Streets of Fire scenarios have been recommended online. Personally I’ve played the shorter, first two scenarios. Guryev’s Headquarters is a classic, and an excellent beginner’s scenario. My first play as a new player vs. an experienced veteran was lost pretty handily. Years later, my second time with this scenario came down to a melee of one squad vs. one squad with the final close combat die rolls deciding the game. Berserk! also came down to the last turn and final close combat with an ambush deciding the game. The Streets of Fire scenarios are available for free download at the MMP website (but you’ll need boards a-d to play them).

With no DASL published in 1986, it was not until 1987 when more scenarios appeared for this system, leading with the first third-party DASL scenario in On All Fronts Issue 50.

In February, the big release for the year was DASL Module 2 Hedgerow Hell, with eight scenarios featuring battles in the bocage terrain of Normandy, France. Three scenarios, Bogged Down, Barkmann’s Corner and Clay Pigeons have received recommendations. Barkmann’s Corner features a Panther tank ambushing an Allied column. While not to the taste of some players, it’s a unique design. A letter in the ASL Annual ’90 stated: “Barkmann’s Corner is the only scenario of any game that I’ve played where one side was wiped out to a man, yet missed victory only by a hair’s width!”

As a training scenario, Ripe Pickings has been recommended especially for learning the capabilities of the Sherman tank.

The bocage rules required further clarification and their initial presentation caused many players to shy away from the module. Later on down the line, the bocage rules were revised in the 2nd edition rules.

Board Game: Hedgerow Hell: ASL Deluxe Module 2
Image by bdneal

Hedgerow Hell also included more AFV cards as well as a set of utility counters mainly for use on the AFV cards. These counters have not been reprinted, though the NO AMMO counters have been essentially replaced with their specific counterparts (such as NO AP, NO SMOKE etc.) in the core module Rising Sun.

Design credits for the first (and only) two official modules of DASL go largely to Charlie Kibler and Rex Martin, with Don Greenwood and David Pope also listed on the Streets of Fire credits. Kibler was also responsible for the wonderful map art.

Later in the year, the classic To the Last Man was published in the Avalon Hill General 24-1. Though favoring the Russians, it is one of the most recommended deluxe scenarios and has been played annually at ASL Oktoberfest. One suggested balance provision is to play the scenario with three players, where the Russian side has two players who are not allowed to talk strategy.

Before the end of the year, two more DASL scenarios arrived from Wargamer magazine and ASL News.

After another gap in 1988, there would be DASL scenarios published every year from 1989 through 2016.

In 1989, two scenarios were released at Origins by In Contact (and later published in Out of the Attic). This release included The Road to St. Lo (recommended). Also, the first ASL Annual featured three scenarios (all recommended): L’Ecole Normale, Last Act in Lorraine (which also has a non-DASL version) and Back to School. L’Ecole Normale is also of interest for its simultaneous setup Special Scenario Rule.

The British AFV card set was released contemporaneously with West of Alamein but as a separate accessory item.

1990 saw the publication of nine DASL scenarios, leading off with Lehr Sanction from ASL News (recommended and later published in ASL Annual ’91). Four scenarios came from On All Fronts, including parts one and two of their Kharkov trilogy, three from the ASL Annual (Intimate War recommended) and Steve Swann gave us a free scenario, Whitmann’s Turkey Shoot. This may have been the first online offering of a DASL scenario.

Board Game: ASL Annual '90
Image by 40thann

In the ASL Annual, this notice appeared:

“Those fans of ASL who have yet to experience the joys of the Deluxe version of this popular game system might be interested to learn that the retail price of each of these modules—STREETS OF FIRE and HEDGEROW HELL—have been dropped to $20.00. Given all the challenge of the scenarios, the beauty of the mapboards, and the information found on the AFV cards in these titles, this is a rare bargain. After three printings, no more are planned for these ASL modules; once current stocks are depleted, you won’t be able to find either again.”

Rex Martin further remarks in the letters column: “As for the Deluxe ASL modules, these are being phased out. It is unfortunate that too many players disdained DASL without having ever tried it. Consider DASL an experiment that failed (saleswise, anyway).”

1991 had three scenarios from On All Fronts including School Daze (recommended). Gruppo Mobile (recommended) from the ASL Annual and a scenario from Rout Report rounded out the year.

In 1992, the ASL Annual had highly recommended scenario Royal Marines along with The Tiger of Tuongoo (recommended). ASL Report also published a scenario.

1993 had two offerings from ASL News, two from On All Fronts, two from the ASL Annuals 93a and 93b and one from The General magazine. From the official publications came two highly recommended scenarios, Tussle at Thomashof (later rebalanced and reissued in Operation Veritable) and The Kiwis Attack. Also, ASL Digest published Smoke the Kents!, another highly recommended scenario that would be officially published next year in The General magazine.

In 1994, the ASL Annual gave us The Mailed Fist (highly recommended). Critical Hit, ASL News, Rout Report and Time on Target provided the other four DASL scenarios for the year.

In 1995 Critical Hit provided four scenarios, with Time on Target and an online offering by Jeffrey Shields giving us two more.

Board Game: Hedgerow Hell: ASL Deluxe Module 2
Image by Mixo

The ASL Annual Winter ’95 provided overlays for DASL but these were undersized. They were reprinted in The General 30-3, and currently are available on the MMP website.

In the ASL Annual ’96, the classic Mayhem in Manila appeared, and was Rick Troha’s 6th DASL design. On All Fronts and Critical Hit each published a scenario, and around this time I believe Jeffrey T. Allen put up four online scenarios.

In 1997, tournaments were the main source of DASL scenarios. A pair of Australian tournaments produced one scenario each, as did the Wild West Fest ’97 and March Madness ’99 Pack. Also, On All Fronts gave us their last DASL scenario.

1998 saw scenarios from Heat of Battle’s Recon by Fire!, Dispatches from the Bunker, MMP News on the internet and Critical Hit. This was the year that the Avalon Hill Game Company was sold to Hasbro. I still remember Doomed Battalions, for a brief moment, finding its way onto a game store shelf.

In 1999 Multi-Man Publishing became the caretaker of ASL, and we saw St. Barthelemy Bash (recommended) published in the debut issue of the ASL Journal. Also of significance was Bounding Fire’s Hell on Wheels Battle Pack with four scenarios and two DASL maps, which subsequently were reprinted by Heat of Battle in Recon by Fire! More scenarios arrived from Dispatches from the Bunker, Critical Hit, and Rate of Fire. Lastly, a Solitaire DASL scenario was published by Critical Hit.

In 2000, DASL scenarios appeared in Dispatches from the Bunker, Heat of Battle’s Tropic Thunder, and at the March Madness tournament. Interestingly, the March Madness offering was designed as a double-blind scenario, where at the start, players didn’t know the exact composition of the other side’s forces.

Publication of the 2nd edition ASL rules made the wall advantage and bocage rules more understandable, and condensed the Deluxe rules to a single page. Bruce Probst remarks that “Ditching all of the miniatures-related material allowed the saving of that space (while also emphasising, indirectly, just how much DASL is more about ASL than it ever was about miniatures gaming).”

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Chigurgh

In 2001, ASL Journal 3 gave us two scenarios, including the gem Brave Little Emchas. This scenario is a late-war duel of 6-5-8s, Panthers, Russian 6-2-8s, 4-5-8s and lend-lease Shermans. The SAGA tournament provided another scenario.

2002 saw two scenarios from Dispatches from the Bunker, and singletons from Heat of Battle, Critical Hit and Fanatic Enterprises. Five scenarios from the Coastal Fortress team of David Roth and Brian Blad were probably published online this year or the year before.

2003 was the best year in over a decade for recommended scenarios. We had Himmler’s House from ASL Journal 5, The Good Shepherd from Operation Veritable, and Radio Wars from Critical Hit. Fanatic Enterprises also contributed a scenario.

2004 saw two scenarios from Heat of Battle (Chas Smith’s Sverdlikova Melee recommended) and one from Le Franc Tireur.

Fanatic Enterprises for the next three years would introduce nationality sets of AFV cards.

2005 was the debut of a key source of DASL scenarios for the next decade, from the Eastside Gamers. Their Dezign Pak came with two DASL scenarios with Backstab being recommended. Two more scenarios were published at ASL Oktoberfest to help celebrate their 20th anniversary. Lastly there was a playtest scenario published on the ASL Australia Yahoo group.

2006 gave us another Australian contribution in the Armoured Aussie Pack, and Dezign Pak 2 had a scenario.

At BoardGameGeek, Jay Richardson noted the genesis of a DASL project coordinated by Steve Swann. It would have new maps and scenarios.

At Gamesquad, Chas Argent created a poll, Would You Buy New Deluxe Boards? 81% of 115 respondents said yes.

In 2007, DASL scenarios arrived from Fanatic Enterprises, ASL Sweden magazine, Eastside Gamers, Dispatches from the Bunker and Critical Hit. Recommended from the latter two are Housing Crash and Streets Afire. Streets Afire is a late-war clash that can be played by three or four with plenty of tanks and a factory fight as well.

Glenn Houseman posted on Gamesquad: “The East Side Gamers are commited to including one "Deluxe ASL" scenario in every scenario pack. Mostly because we love playing on the Deluxe boards, and partly to keep alive this seemingly dying aspect of ASL that we have enjoyed so much in the past, and would like to see continue. Are we wrong? Many prominent ASL personalities would say we are. Do you think Deluxe ASL should just fade away and die gracefully? Do you think it should be kept alive (at least on life support such as we are doing)...or maybe even expanded upon?”

2008 was a third-party potpourri with eight titles, one each from Heat of Battle, Southern California ASL Club, Dispatches from the Bunker, Critical Hit, Eastside Gamers, the Torneo Master Bulletin, the Panzer Kompany Waffen-SS Pack Teaser (the same scenario appeared on A Bridge Too Far’s historical map) and an online design contest at Gamesquad. The latter produced the highly recommended Streets of Carpiquet.

Board Game: Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
Image by Richfam

Jay Richardson reported at BoardGameGeek that VASL, the online boardgaming platform, had their DASL boards a-h redone with a larger hex size and look closer to the originals. Even online, DASL helped with counter stacking visibility.

In 2009 we had offerings from March Madness, Heat of Battle and Dezign Pak 5.

In 2010 the first official DASL scenarios in seven years appeared in ASL Journal 8 courtesy of Pete Shelling. Both scenarios, Charging Chaumont and Cobra Kings are recommended. The Rocky Mountain Rumble produced another Shelling scenario (it would officially appear in ASL Journal 11). And once again we have an Eastside Gamers contribution.

The only scenarios in 2011 were two from Eastside Gamers Dezign Pak 7.

Posts at BoardGameGeek suggested that the DASL project discussed in 2006 had languished partly due to lack of playtesters and scenario designs.

Chas Argent created a poll gauging the interest in a new DASL pack. Fans enthusiastically said yes (79% of 164 voters) while detractors wanted that energy put into other ASL projects.

2012 had scenarios published in ASL Journal 10 and Dezign Pak 8. Online, Scott Holst offered up a playtest scenario along with Gamesquad’s “Psycho” who created three small scenarios based on the fictional works of Leo Kessler and Sven Hassel. There was also a free offering by Pete Shelling at ASL Oktoberfest.

In 2013, once again Eastside Gamers kept the light on with a single new DASL scenario, Frosty the Dead Man, which has been recommended.

View from the Trenches Issue 89 previewed the Deluxe Pack project for which Dave Ramsey of the ASL Scenario Archive had taken up the reigns from Steve Swann.

Board Game: Advanced Squad Leader: Deluxe Pack 1
Image by rexbinary

Nearly on cue, in the summer of 2014, Le Franc Tireur published Deluxe Pack #1, with 12 scenarios and seven maps. Dave Ramsey had production credit, and Steve Swann was credited with the initial pack concept and map creation. The map art was by John Rice. The pack included Steve Swann’s 5th DASL scenario design and Pete Shelling’s 8th.

At the end of his review of Deluxe Pack #1, Mark Pitcavage of Desperation Morale stated that this pack was a worthy addition for DASL lovers. However, in the comments below the review, Bruce Probst thought the map artwork was functional at best, and opined that the design work was flawed. It seems to me the map art is a matter of taste (with the drop-shadow effects having elicited the most comment in our local group). As to scenario quality, early ROAR results for 70+ playings seem indeterminate.

A few months later, at ASL Oktoberfest, we saw the last offerings of the Eastside Gamers with a DASL scenario in Dezign Pak 10. In a decade of DASL contributions, Glenn Houseman designed 11 DASL scenarios.

2015-2017 had only two DASL scenario contributions. 2015 had a Critical Hit scenario and 2016 saw release of the Nor’easter 20th Anniversary Scenario Pack from the New England Volunteers and Yankee ASL. It included Ralph McDonald’s 5th DASL design, notable for the first use of the Le Franc Tireur deluxe boards outside of that pack.

DASL was now perhaps at the limit of its scenario design envelope as far as the eight original deluxe boards were concerned, having relied on them for three decades.

No DASL scenarios came out in 2017 but in September, Perry of MMP posted “Surprise. We are working on reprinting the DASL maps in the new method.
I do not think we ever said we would never make new DASL stuff.
I think we only ever said we were not going to make new DASL stuff tomorrow.
Tomorrow is now yesterday.
Stay tuned.”

Board Game: WO Bonus Pack #9: ASL Scenario Bonus Pack for Winter Offensive 2018
Image by gamer72

A welcome surprise for DASL fans occurred in January 2018. A de facto mini-DASL module was released in the form of MMP’s annual Winter Offensive Bonus Pack (#9), which raised funds for the WWII Foundation. This time, instead of the standard geomorphic map board and requisite scenarios, the pack featured four new official deluxe boards beautifully painted by Charlie Kibler. The five DASL scenarios included the recommended Checking Out. This Bonus Pack was tantalizing proof of solid interest at MMP for DASL.

In August, the Grumble Jones ASL blog made available for free download an Ortona, Italy 1943 scenario utilizing one of the new official deluxe boards.

Board Game: WO Bonus Pack #9: ASL Scenario Bonus Pack for Winter Offensive 2018
Image by Chigurgh

On October 1st, Deluxe ASL Redux appeared on preorder and surpassed half of its P800 goal before the end of the month. The reissue of the Streets of Fire and Hedgerow Hell boards to the new lighter-weight Starter Kit style would make these maps much more portable; being repainted by Charlie Kibler would be an added bonus.

Of greater significance would be the reprinting and rebalancing (if deemed necessary) of over 30 classic scenarios.

In summary, I believe the long-term appeal of DASL comes down to the following points:

1) Many fun and excellent scenarios (at least 25% of those in existence have been recommended), with their distinct flavor of close quarter fighting in the city and bocage.

2) Little to no stacking on the large hexes. No more “leaning towers of Pisa” as one ASLer put it.

3) The aesthetic appeal of the larger map art.

Here’s to hoping Deluxe ASL Redux will reach the P800 number soon.


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Erwin Lau
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An excellent writeup. I agree with your points wholeheartedly.
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Wish I was 20 years younger and I would dive back in to this lovely game.
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Great review!
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al Cann
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BigAl737 wrote:
Great review!
So you're the guy! The guy who's name always pops up when I type in my ROAR results. You probably have experienced the same with my name.

Nice to finally meet you, sort of!

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Al Cannamore
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albcann wrote:
BigAl737 wrote:
Great review!
So you're the guy! The guy who's name always pops up when I type in my ROAR results. You probably have experienced the same with my name.

Nice to finally meet you, sort of! :D

That be me. Nice to meet you too. I've done a few double takes when I see your name pop up as well. We'll have to play a game sometime to see if ROAR can handle the similarity :-)
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Well researched and written contribution, thanks!
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BigAl737 wrote:
albcann wrote:
BigAl737 wrote:
Great review!
So you're the guy! The guy who's name always pops up when I type in my ROAR results. You probably have experienced the same with my name.

Nice to finally meet you, sort of!

That be me. Nice to meet you too. I've done a few double takes when I see your name pop up as well. We'll have to play a game sometime to see if ROAR can handle the similarity :-)
Absolutely!
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Wow, I thought Deluxe ASL had big hexes to reduce crowding and eliminate those tall stacks full of status counters. I had no idea it was so people could use tank miniatures! No wonder it flopped. Plenty of miniature games already.

That, and the tiny boards. With big hexes the boards should have been larger to fit more hexes.
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I LOVE DASL. Without a local player, I rarely get to them except at tournaments. I find it just isn't well implemented on VASL. If only there was a way to zoom out without the counters becoming miniscule.

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FYI, the DASL overlays for the DASL boards didn't work in VASL for some time. That has been fixed with the Overlay Extension. You can get v1.02 here:

http://vasl.info/extensions.htm

Also, VASL let's you size any board to DASL size. This might appeal to those playing a one map counter dense scenario. Once you convert, you can't go back again...well you can but your counters will be misplaced. Also, as Ken says, when you zoom out, the counters get very small. The mouse over zoom feature still works normally though.

Interestingly, the DASL overlays in the Overlay Extension still maintain their size so they do work with this feature. However, non-DASL overlays from the Overlay Extension don't resize properly. Hmmm, have to see about adding that ability.

Allan
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Fantastic post! well researched, illustrated and written.

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Very nice write up, thanks for doing this!!

Regards
Joe
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Great overview.

While I have all AH ASL games, I no longer play them.

Only the ASL starter kits come to the table now and then.

I picked up the latest 2018 Winter release from MMP though as I always found that the ASL De Luxe boards were far better to play ASL due to their space and practically non stacking problems.

I will buy the new De Luxe edition in 2019 with the many new and corrected scenarios. I am sure I will replay a few of these too!

Actually the scale of tactical WW2 games for me is too small to have a true simulation value. I am more into operational and or grand tactical wargaming these days.

As to pure AI bot driven solo games I have too much challenging fun with Butterfield designs like the DDay series or Conflict of Heroes the solo expansion. ASL has too much switches/interrupts between players in a turn to have much solo fun.

BUT the De Luxe boards always had a special place in my heart (still a lot of unpainted micro armour in my closets AND still a special place for these armour cards).

Good ol days
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jumbit wrote:
Wow, I thought Deluxe ASL had big hexes to reduce crowding and eliminate those tall stacks full of status counters. I had no idea it was so people could use tank miniatures! No wonder it flopped. Plenty of miniature games already.

That, and the tiny boards. With big hexes the boards should have been larger to fit more hexes.
The new scenarios included with the Winter De Luxe expansion have 3 to 4 mapboards and give me the impression of playing on a broader surface.

That could be a subjective impression but I simply love the De Luxe edition of ASL!
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I read recently that some of the original Squad Leader boards (Namely #1-4)
had been reproduced in Deluxe format.

Is this true?

Also, is there a list of all the Deluxe boards produced?

I would love to see if I could buy some of them...

Thanks for any help.
 
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Not in any official capacity, no. There's various people who have blown up various boards to larger sizes, and I suppose among them is someone who has blown up #1-4 to DASL hex size.

Actual Deluxe ASL boards:
a-d - in Streets of Fire: ASL Deluxe Module 1
e-h - in Hedgerow Hell: ASL Deluxe Module 2

All eight are due to be re-done in Deluxe ASL Redux, currently on preorder.

i-l - in WO Bonus Pack #9: ASL Scenario Bonus Pack for Winter Offensive 2018

And one third party set in the same size, but a somewhat different art style:

d1-d7 - in Advanced Squad Leader: Deluxe Pack 1
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All eight are due to be re-done in Deluxe ASL Redux, currently on preorder.


http://www.multimanpublishing.com/tabid/59/ProductID/363/Def...
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Fen Yan
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La Mirada
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This article has been updated and published online in View from the Trenches 107: http://www.vftt.co.uk/vfttpdf/vftt107.pdf or go to http://www.vftt.co.uk/index.asp and click on the magazine link.

There will be at least three DASL scenarios published by the end of this year, and two of them use the old boards to be reprinted in Deluxe Redux:

Special Ops 9: O18 Purple Heart Hill
Rally Point 17: RPT161 Let's Shoot the S.O.B.s
Action Pack 14: AP134 Death Takes a Toll (coming out in October)
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Fen Yan
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I would also add to James' list of published DASL maps the two by Heat of Battle in Recon by Fire #2 and #4.
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