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Subject: DUNGEON UNIVERSALIS review rss

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Garou
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This is a original review from the game tester DocSavage on BSK forum. http://labsk.net/index.php?topic=216572.0


DUNGEON UNIVERSALIS review

Dungeon Universalis (DUN) is a clever mix of role-playing, board game, and Mordheim-style skirmish, though we might call it an advanced dungeon game, a direct but distant descendant of the mythical Heroquest. Created by Oscar Bribián, who has also written and edited "Raazbal", the book in which it has been based the game, it is designed to be played as solitary mode or up to 6 players.

Several players can play cooperatively against an "artificial intelligence", but the game is fully enjoyed if one of the players assumes the role of the Dark Player, who is the one who will try at all costs to prevent heroes from achieving their goals. The game has a variable duration, because if you play a campaign you will be able to enjoy it for many hours. The short games should last about 30 minutes, but if you don't have experience in the game, you can expend half hour only to prepare the material to use during the game because, as we will see later, there are so many options that, until you get the point, they stun a little.



GAME OVERVIEW
DUN is set in the typical medieval fantasy world, in which humans coexist with elves, goblins, undead, trolls, etc., which, as I said before, is the universe where the fantasy novel written by the creator of the game is developed. Each player controls one or more heroes which can also be evil, such as vampires or assassins) who may be accompanied by mercenaries or pets and who will try to fulfill a goal in each mission. These missions can be interconnected in the case of a campaign, which, for me, is the most advisable if you want to enjoy the "role-playing" part of the game, that is, the evolution of your character, since each mission, successful or not, will provide you with experience and gold that you can use for that purpose. There are games that end after a certain number of turns, but others are subject to reach several objectives. Each scenario specifies the duration and conditions of victory.

Box Contents
It is a box of good size and not light weight. Inside there are:
- More than 100 skill cards (85 of which can be acquired by profession).
- 95 travel event cards.
- 20 professions cards.
- 25 furniture tokens.
- 80 Dark Player action cards.
- 18 hero race cards.
- 30 special elements cards
- 96 spell cards
- 170 equipment cards (weapons, armors, potions, rope...)
- 53 magic object cards.
- more than 200 standees.
- Various colored bases for the cardboard cards.
- A large number of cardboard markers for wounds, mana, coins, status indicators, etc.
- A bestiary.
- An adventures and campaigns book
- A Rulebook
- A world map
- Two large cardboard markers about 20x8 cm
- 8 dice
The components reflect the author's concern for quality and practicality. It is evident that Óscar Bribián, as an assiduous player, is concerned that everything is practical and playable, without forgetting attractive and professional designs. The box contains a lot of material: cards (more than 700), markers, tiles, furniture counters, mana and gold counters, character and hero cards, etc., as well as the rulebook, a detailed bestiary, the adventure book and a campaign map. The game's graphic art comes mainly from two hands: Daniel Comerci, author of the cover and various illustrations of creatures and heroes, and Antal Kéninger, who has done most of the tiles and furniture design for the game. The illustrations and the card design are very nice and according to the theme. The cards are well explained due to their size and the iconography used is very intuitive. At first it can be hard to handle so much information, but after a while you've become familiar with your character's abilities and characteristics, because although the variety to create it is overwhelming, in the end you only use a few according to your way of playing. In addition, all skills are perfectly explained in small cards that, at the beginning, you can have next to the character to know at all times what a certain skill is, so you don't have to go to the rulebook constantly.


How it Works
As I said before the game has a variable duration, from thirty minutes to several hours. The first thing to do is to decide whether to play with a human Dark Player or not. I personally always recommend the first option, because an AI will never have the depth and complexity of human thought, although playing all together against a common enemy also has its charm.
Once the role of each one has been decided, you can create your own character. If you want to skip that step, the game offers you a series of predefined characters, but the nice thing for me is to create your own character, like role-playing style.
The variety of races (18) and professions (20) that DUN offers us allows us enormous possibilities of combination, and in addition, you have eight experience points to further customize your character, increasing its strength, agility, speed, intelligence, etc.. You also have 20 coins to buy various materials, such as weapons, amour, potions, picklocks…
The sum of the value of the heroes, the value of the possible mercenaries hired to help you, the value of the potions and magical objects they may carry will be the points available to the Dark Player to complicate things in each scenario. The aim is to ensure that, whatever the number of players, the game is always balanced. In the games I've played it's really like that, but logically, I haven't been able to check all the possible combinations of number of heroes and scenarios. With these points and depending on the number of heroes, the Dark Player will have a number of cards of traps, enemies, weapons etc., which he will place in decks in front of him and which he will acquire as the turns pass.



Indeed, it's a turn-based game, in which heroes always begin to act. However, these dynamic changes as soon as an enemy appears. Then there is a die roll between the two sides with a series of modifiers and the winner has the initiative throughout the fight, which is vital because all characters on each side act before any of the other act.
This game is played with dice, six-sided in particular, and it's done in two ways:
The first is the skills check. For example, if I want to jump a moat that has come out in a hallway from nowhere I must roll two dice and get a 10 or more to succeed. But don't be frightened, to the result of the dice roll you have to add the "agility" attribute of our hero, which usually ranges between 3 and 5. Elves, for example, are very agile and would surpass the roll with a simple 5 between the two dice. But beware, wearing armor penalizes our agility, so the greater the protection, the less chance of passing agility trials.

The second kind of dice roll is the one between heroes and the Dark Player, for example in melee combats. Each side rolls two dice, adds its weapons ability (which may vary depending on the equipment) and the one who gets the most wins that round. In the event of a tie, the most agile wins, and if the tie continues, the one with the shield wins. If, however, the tie persists, the defender wins. If he wins nothing happens, but if the attacker wins will make as many damage dice as his strength attribute plus the modifiers of the weapon he wears and roll against the armor of the target. You have to be careful because the life points are scarce and in a single stroke they can kill you. That's where the points of fortune come in, which I'll explain next.



Fortune points are used to repeat a bad roll or to survive a certain death. It is best to save them for the latter, which happens more often than heroes would wish. To use them in this way you must have received a death blow; then you will spend one fortune point, which will be two if you don't get a 5 on a die roll. In other words, with two fortune points you'll safely get rid of the blow (as if it hadn't hit) and you'll only need to spend one if you get a result of 5 on a die roll. However, according to the game's maker, fortune points primarily serve to equalize the game's available races. The easier you are to incapacitate, the more fortune points you will have. So, a hobbit starts with eight fortune points while if you play with a troll you only have two.



Returning to the development of the game, if you are not in combat phase you are in exploration phase, in which may appear traps (set by the Dark Player or preset by the scenario), secret doors, rooms with events, gold coins and even magical objects.
Each scenario will indicate the goal of the heroes and whether they have specific turns to achieve it. It will also guide you through the types of enemies you will encounter (undead, barbarians, goblins...). The Dark Player will not give all the information to the heroes, but will do so as they progress through the scenario. Thanks to the progress of history, the map is discovered as the heroes advance. The variety of rooms and corridors available in the game are enough to represent a multitude of different scenarios. By the way, the quality of the drawings of all these elements is excellent and helps you to immerse yourself in the adventure even more. In short, the heroes' job is to advance towards an objective, overcoming obstacles and overcoming (or avoiding) the opponents that the Dark Player places in his path.
The Dark Player plays in a totally different way. It has, as we have said, a budget commensurate with the heroes it faces, both in number and quality, and it can spend that budget as it sees fit, but restricted to the cards you have in his hand and which increase as the turns go by. Those cards can also be returned to the deck in exchange for more points, which you can use later. This is especially useful since the number of cards you can have available is limited.
What can the Dark Player do? It has no less than 60 different actions, with which it can shoot a trap when opening a door, it can take a thief who can steal an item from your backpack, it can surprise you with an ambush, it can throw a rolling ball in the purest Indiana Jones style and so on up to 60 cards. Fortune will determine what cards he has, so he's also not free to do what he wants at all times.

If finally the heroes obtain their mission they will obtain different rewards and experience with which it will be possible to be improved his character and with the gold obtained he will be able to buy better equipment and weapons.
In addition to the main mission, both the heroes and the Dark Player earn victory points throughout the game. For example, heroes earn victory points by killing creatures, casting spells successfully, or opening closed doors, and the Dark Player gets them by the course of turns or each time a hero spends a point of fortune. It is highly recommended that heroes get more victory points than their opponent at the end of the game, as it depends on whether they get certain rewards or experience points.
And all this can be included in a campaign, which is undoubtedly highly recommended. In the game there is a world map where different types of terrain (forests, plains...) as well as main cities, villages and castles are detailed. Your way of moving is quite free, although you have to go throughout the campaign to a certain city to follow the development of it, the path you choose is free, so you may want to divert to a nearby inn to regain strength or go to a castle to try to improve your equipment. In any case, every time you move to a box you must pick up a travel event card, so have your axe at hand...

GAMEPLAY
Dungeon Universalis drinks from the essence of the mythical Heroquest, but turned into a much deeper and more mature game; Dungeon Universalis is to Heroquest what the Iphone X is to the first Motorola.
It is a dungeon game elevated to the nth power in terms of possibilities, not in terms of complexity. It's true that it's overwhelming in terms of the number of items available at the beginning of the game, but once you've created your character and the adventure begins, the items to be used are fully manageable in number, leaving out so many possibilities that you're willing to start another adventure in order to try them out. I've been lucky enough to be able to play both the hero and the Dark Player roles. They are both very funny but very different in operation. I recommend the role of Dark Player to anyone who has liked to do a "master" in any role-playing game or adventure, will enjoy it...



One very good thing about this game is that it doesn't require all players to know the rules at their fingertips in order to enjoy it. It is enough for a player to know them well to be able to help others in their decisions, and it doesn't have to be the Dark Player. Therefore, the poor owner of the game is not condemned to be, yes or yes, "the bad guy of the movie", which, in my opinion, is a great advantage over other games, in which the lucky owner of the game can hardly be a hero anymore. Logically it will take a short period of learning to know the game system, but in a few minutes you will be enjoying the adventure.
It is also very interesting that all races and professions are playable and not one clearly prevails over the others. Will be necessary to make adequate progress in a campaign that the group is balanced. An explorer to detect traps and enemies and a fighter (which does not have to be a warrior) are essential in my experience. From there a mage and somebody skillful to deactivate traps and open locks are a good complement. However, in our game group we have tried other combinations and they have turned out to be super fun and strangely effective.

On the other hand, the role of Dark Player is by no means that of a mere storyteller, who discovers rooms with predefined enemies and removes them as the heroes eliminate them. Knowing which card to play and when to play it totally changes a game. For example, you can set traps to heroes of high armor and little perception or draw large numbers of enemies to heroes very agile but weaker in combat. You can take out many basic creatures to saturate by the number or few but very powerful creatures that can eliminate in a single stroke the strongest warrior. You can spend points gradually throughout the game or reserve a large number of points to make a last room a real nightmare. A bad management of your points and cards will make the heroes' task much easier and an optimal use of the available resources will turn any dungeon into a real challenge.
Another plus for the Dark Player is that he can handle characters almost as complex as heroes. I haven't named it until now but in each adventure you face a specific faction of enemies: creatures of the night, felids, orcs, barbarians, demons, outlaws, beast men... Each faction has three types of creatures: lower-ranking or basic creatures (represented in white), intermediate creatures (represented in yellow) and upper-ranking creatures (represented in red).
The higher ranks not only have the same characteristics as a normal hero, but you can also choose the most available weaponry appropriate to the enemies you face and you can even spend points on improving them with skills that make them even more effective in their mission.

The quality of the cardboard representing the heroes and creatures is correct, clearly representing what they have to represent. I particularly like to play with miniatures, which is why we have a spectacular collection in our game club, but I recognize that for a normal player to be able to represent all the creatures in the game through miniatures could be a Herculean task and not cheap at all. It is true that the publisher will provide players with a series of miniatures in very high quality resin, but they are not necessary to enjoy the game.
I haven't tried the single-player version, which according to the author will use a mobile app, so I can't evaluate it. From two players you can have a great time, but in this case I would recommend that the player "hero" take several characters to enjoy more of the adventure.

You can play with just one, the game contemplates it, but in that case you're going to weaken in some aspect of the game (you can't be agile and armored at the same time) so the Dark Player is going to be able to exploit your weaknesses better. From my point of view the optimal number of characters would be around four, but in this case nothing prevents them from being played between two players, for example.

Final Thoughts
If you were passionate about Heroquest when you were a kid, this is your game.
Like the movies we loved and which, seen now, are disappointing, if you played Heroquest today you would find it bland, simple and predictable. Dungeon Universalis is a well-developed, atmospheric and designed Heroquest for adults. It makes you feel those sensations of uncertainty and expectation again when you walk through the corridors of a dungeon and a certain anxiety and excitement when you open the door of that gloomy room....

It is amazing the amount of materials that come in the game, so many that at first come to intimidate. The good thing is that this is due to the great variety of options in the game, not to the complexity of it. Logically the box is of proportions and weight according to the enormous amount of cardboard included. In the box does not come any system of archiving letters, which would be appreciated, but it is nothing that we cannot solve by ourselves.
It's a game that's relatively easy to understand and master. As I mentioned before, it's enough that one of the groups knows the rules so that everyone can play with a minimum of previous training.
To me in particular, it's a game that hooked me from the first moment, because of its theme and its depth. The campaign is what allows you to exploit all the virtues of this great game, but you can also enjoy it in short and independent games, to try that warrior goblin, for example (which we have done, by the way...).

A more than recommended investment.

Pros:
- Fantastic theme that is familiar but with original touches.
- Atmosphere: the tiles and additional material contribute a lot in this respect.
- Character customization: The amount of options available make your character very personal.
- Replayability to satiety: The number of character options and that dungeons are going to be different each time (due to the independence of the Dark Player) make this game almost infinite.
- The owner of the game does NOT have to be the Dark Player at all times.
- Very reasonable price for the amount of material it brings.

Cons:
- The box is somewhat bulky and heavy, it cannot be stored anywhere.
- Initially it only comes from Kickstarter, which will make it very difficult to get it posteriori.

Greetings

http://www.dungeonuniversalis.es
PD. The photos are taken by Dungeon Universalisy and are copyright of their respective authors.
Author: Óscar Bribian
Publisher: Ludic Dragon Games
Duration: From 30 minutes onwards.
Number of players: 1-6.
Ideal number of players: For my best taste with 4 characters and a Human Dark Player. But the characters can be carried by one or two players so 2 or 3 are still a good number of players to enjoy the game.
Language: Spanish or English
Recommended age: From 12 years old

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Parrilla84
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Awesome! O.o

I'm in! All in! laugh
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Xavier Esteller Marti
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It seems an incredible game. I have been following it for some time on social networks and its website.
Tomorrow when the kickstarter comes out, I'm inside.
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Carlos Botía
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all in! Amazing Game. I´m back this game in minute 0.
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Oscar
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All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost
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Tomorrow in KICKSTARTER!!!

(November 1, 16:00 GMT)
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Casey Nordell

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I just backed. I'm primarily interested in two-play co-op play (without a Dark Player).
The above review seems to suggest that playing with four player and with a Dark Player is the better way to play.
I hope the game still satisfies when playing co-op with only two people...
 
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Khelz Underworld
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I'm all in too. I hope they will disclose more and more about the gameplay throughout the campaign.
 
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Fernando Moros
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Wow! Great great job. It looks fantastic!
 
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Big Lebowski
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The Dude abides!
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yeah? well… y’know, that’s just like, uh… your opinion, man…
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Great article. Lots of information, good pics.

The game looks great! I don‘t see many ideas that haven‘t been done before in other dungeon crawlers (I love the idea of baddies with same equipment and weaponry as the heroes), but this attempt looks very professional and comprehensive, and lots of labour of love went in it.

I wish the kickstarter big success!

Minor nitpick: this article is posted and written as review, but easily recognized as ad. You should be open about that and let the game speak for itself.
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Ukko Kaarto
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Overall everything sounds good, but there is a fine line of being too streamlined and thus shallow/boring and too complicated and fiddly.

Also if there are other things to do than kill monsters and win is a big deal for me. Are there other interactions to do in scenarios than just go from point A to B and kill everything on the way?

"it can take a thief who can steal an item from your backpack" was the sentence that got me worried. Is there a card that creates an invisible thief that steals something from a hero and then disappears without a chance for the hero to see/catch the thief? Or is it worded in a thematic way that "You reach for your healing potion, but it seems to be missing. Could it be that the shady character you bumped into earlier in the city market pickpocketed it from your backpack..."?
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Liam M
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woodoo03 wrote:
Great article. Lots of information, good pics.

The game looks great! I don‘t see many ideas that haven‘t been done before in other dungeon crawlers (I love he ideas of baddies with saem equipment and wesponry as the heroes), but this attempt looks very professional and comprehensive, and lots of labour of love went in it.

I wish the kickstarter big success!

Minor nitpick: this article is posted and written as review, but easily recognized as ad. You should be open about that and let the game speak for itself.

Agreed. Rings alarm bells
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Štěpán Honc
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Indeed, this is an ad, pretending to be a review. (Not just posted in a wrong section, it seems to be meant to pretend what it isn’t) Then first few comments look like Spanish kids organised from elsewhere just to hype it here, too?

Though I can’t read the novel to find the quality of writing myself, and with all respect a Spanish teacher of English language wouldn’t be my choice for translation of anything artistic (I’d always pick an experienced native English translator from Spanish, preferably a writer themselves), at first I liked this KS project quite a bit. But things like this don’t help me to trust the honesty of these guys at all...

Edit: I see now that you admit you’re a play tester at the beginning and maybe I’m biased because I’ve seen this “strategy” many times before and it always went wrong... Thanks for the info!
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Tom Eklund
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Polylux1 wrote:
Indeed, this is an ad, pretending to be a review.

I agree. Also, this KS is very expensive for what it is (no minis).
 
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Casey Nordell

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Azikin wrote:
this KS is very expensive for what it is (no minis).

This is simply not true. The game has a similar number of standees and cards as Gloomhaven and also has a similar price to Gloomhaven. (Or, put another way, DUN would be *hundreds* of dollars if it included 200+ minis.)

In terms of physical content included in the game, the price is fair. What remains to be seen is the return on investment for the (quantity and quality) of narrative/mechanical gameplay content.
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jesse durham

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How does the dark player win the campaign?
 
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Tom H
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PoshFrosh wrote:
The game has a similar number of standees and cards as Gloomhaven and also has a similar price to Gloomhaven.
Your right about the standee count but Gloomhaven has over 1600 cards (IIRC) which is more than double what is in DUN. That being said, DUN has added about 100 cards through stretch goals so far, but there's still a long way to go before it has a "similar" number.
 
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J T
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Yeah but gloomhaven cards are so thin you can nearly see through. If DUN have better cards quality, its no suprise that it cost more.
 
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Sergio Macias
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Deadpoetic6 wrote:
Yeah but gloomhaven cards are so thin you can nearly see through. If DUN have better cards quality, its no suprise that it cost more.

Do we know if they have better quality?
 
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Oscar Ibanez
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The cards, just like all the contents included in the game, will be produced in Europe, not China. A well-known, relayable printing press is in charge of all the cardboard production. The cards were drdered with the standard thickness (hopufully a bit thicker than the ones in the game you´re mentioning) and outstanding quality.
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James
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Gloomhaven isn't a good thing to compare prices with. Gloomhaven was hilariously cheap. $100 including shipping for 20+ lbs of stuff in a 200+ hour legacy game. I felt guilty backing it. Pretty much everything on kickstarter now, big or small, is $100+ so you really need to switch framing.
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Jez Dedman
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Vehementi wrote:
Gloomhaven isn't a good thing to compare prices with. Gloomhaven was hilariously cheap. $100 including shipping for 20+ lbs of stuff in a 200+ hour legacy game. I felt guilty backing it. Pretty much everything on kickstarter now, big or small, is $100+ so you really need to switch framing.

The first print run on KS of Gloomhaven was $74 for me in the UK (including shipping)

How things change!!
 
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Casey Nordell

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Vehementi wrote:
Gloomhaven isn't a good thing to compare prices with. Gloomhaven was hilariously cheap. $100 including shipping for 20+ lbs of stuff in a 200+ hour legacy game. I felt guilty backing it. Pretty much everything on kickstarter now, big or small, is $100+ so you really need to switch framing.

But this makes it an even better comparison. The OP was claiming that DUN isn't worth the asking price because it doesn't have minis. I pointed out a game that has a similar number of standees and costs about the same. If Gloomhaven is underpriced, then DUN should cost even more than it does.

With all this said, the DUN creator said the DUN box weighs six pounds, which is quite a bit less than the 20 lb Gloomhaven box, so there's that...

But this material discussion is all pretty silly anyway. The real value in a game is the gameplay and content. I would like to know more about DUN in this regard, particularly in the co-op mode when playing without the Dark Player. I know this is important to me and many other pledgers and potential pledgers.
 
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Juhan Voolaid
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Yet another 10-tonn dungeon crawler. This is a lifetstyle game, not "Heroquest for adults". Adults do not have time for this.

"If you played Heroquest today you would find it bland, simple and predictable" -- then make it deeper yet managable. But you bloat it with massive amount of stuff. This is not depth.

"One very good thing about this game is that it doesn't require all players to know the rules at their fingertips in order to enjoy it. It is enough for a player to know them well" -- in other words it is hard to teach.


So my wait for spiritual successor for Heroquest continues ...
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François Mahieu
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My concern is the lack of infos about the full coop mode (without the need of a dungeon master). How is the AI of the monsters/traps managed?
 
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Artur Rodriguez
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Same for me more solo/coop info is what I need to jump into it.
 
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