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Clue Master Detective» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A Family Man’s Perspecive – THE Clue Game rss

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Jim Nave
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*I am in my early 30’s; have 2 small kids whom I’m trying to raise well; am busy with the work I do; love to play games. My reviews reflect these aspects of my life. So perhaps if you are in a similar area of life you may find my perspective helpful for what you’re looking for.*

The Kid Factor: No real problem here except of course for the theme. But no gory pictures or anything.

The Basics:
The game takes place in the large manor of Mr. Body in which several individuals have been invited over for a large banquet. However, sometime during the evening Mr. Body is murdered. It’s up to you and the other players to find out whodunit, howhedunit, and wherehedunit.

The game consists of playing sheet (which has a list of all items in the game), playing pieces, weapons, a board game representing the mansion, and playing cards that correspond to each person, room, and potential weapon in the mansion. These are shuffled into 3 piles, from which 1 card is secretly taken from each pile and hidden under the board. The drawn cards (which no-one knows) are thus, the killer, the location, and the weapon. The rest of the cards are shuffled together and distributed to the players.

Gameplay starts by each player attempting to move through the mansion (this is done with a single six-sided die) to varying rooms where he/she can make an educated guess at how Mr. Body died – (i.e. “It was Colonel Mustard in the Dining Room with the Candlestick”). The person directly to their left now must disprove that theory by secretly showing one of the three items mentioned in the guess (i.e. Colonel Mustard, the Dining Room, or the Candlestick). If that person is not able to disprove the theory then the person to their left must disprove it. Once the theory has been disproved the original player then marks the card off of his playing sheet and effectively discounts it as being part of the solution – remember the real cards are under the board and thus cannot be used to disprove an accusation.

This continues until one of the players believes they have enough information to make a reasonable accusation. At this point, they must make it to the alleged sight of the murder, and make an accusation. After announcing their accusation, they then secretly look at the cards under the board to see if they were correct or not. If they guessed correctly the game is over and they win; if they guess wrong, they are eliminated from the game and the turns continue.


Clue itself
This game has been around forever. And rightfully so: Clue is a classic. The gameplay is well-done and the mechanics carry-out across the decades. Now of course they have come out with “Mystery of the Abbey” (which I haven’t played), which is as far as I understand a “new” Clue. This is a testimony to how well Clue has held-up over the years: people still like to play it.

Master Detective
So what’s special about the Master Detective edition? You can boil it down to one word: more. They have included a larger board (more rooms), more weapons, and more people to choose from. This basically makes the game a bit longer and adds a little more newness to the game if you’ve already played it a million times.

Another nice touch is the rulebook. They’ve really spent time fleshing out the different characters and their motives for possibly killing Mr. Body. Not that any of it actually matters to the gameplay, but it does add immensely to the theme.

I also have to note how nice the weapon pieces are. Instead of being cruddy little plastic things they actually have some weight to them and are well sculpted. I have to admit, my favorite is the bottle of poison (which was not in the original).

Bottom Line
Great game – if you like Clue. If you don’t like Clue, then it will just be more for you to dislike. The only problem I see is whether or not this game is still in print or not. I would assume that if this particular version is not that there is a reprint version out there somewhere.
I give this game a 9 out 10 since it expands very well on an already great game.
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Mike Urban
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Because there is more of everything, there are a few things changed to speed play. One is that you are rolling two dice instead of one, cannot be blocked at doorways, and do not have to stop in rooms during your move (good: the dice rolling to go from room to room introduces randomness of dubious value into the deduction game, and this arrangement increases mobility considerably). Another addition is 'snoop' spaces that let you look at a random card from another player's hand. Finally, when you make a Suggestion, you see one card from _all_ players who have them in their hands.

The Snoop and revised Suggestion rules doubtless speed the game, but adult players will probably wish to use the original rule and ignore the Snoop spaces. This should make for a sufficiently challenging logic puzzle.

Oh, and by the way, the victim's name (in the U.S. -- the rulebook provides interesting information on the characters in other countries) is 'Boddy', not 'Body'.

I haven't played in years. This makes me think I might want to try to get it to the table one of these days.
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Jim Nave
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Thank you for the post... you actually filled in a lot of what I didn't mention. Thank you!
 
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ɹǝsɐɹɟ
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Back in the days when there were less maps we played every map back to back
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Ooh a little higher, now a bit to the left, a little more, a little more, just a bit more. Oooh yes, that's the spot!
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There is another substantial difference between Clue Master Detective and Clue that is worth mentioning.

When posing a question in the original Cluedo (as it is called in my neck of the woods), you start with the player to the left and and as soon as someone shows you a card it stops. With Cluedo Master Detective the rules state that you continue around all players. Most people I know play Cluedo Master Detective with the original rules Cluedo (or make considerably less double or triple blind guesses).
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Sam Butler
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You mentioned Mystery of the Abbey being similar to Clue, which is somewhat true, but not to the extent I think you imply. It is more like an even mix between Clue and Guess Who, plus a few elements of its own. There is some murderer, but you get points for guessing features correctly (fat/thin, bearded/clean-shaven, etc; 5 features per person total), along with points for solving it correctly. You have to pay closer attention to it, it's not difficult per se, but you may find yourself making educated guesses because you have most, but not all, thin guys eliminated so you guess the murderer is fat, and so on.

I love Clue: Master Detective and Mystery of the Abbey. They are similar enough that if you like one, you will almost definitely like the other, but they are different enough to not feel the same except in only the most basic of ways, so you don't end up buying just another incantation of the same game.
 
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Regards,
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I made a post in another thread giving my opinions about the rule changes between Clue and Clue: Master Detective, so I won't restate them here, except to say that I prefer Master Detective's rules and would even use them in the original Clue, despite being a fan of Clue for over 20 years and counting.


That said, great review. I do think it would be worthwhile to be more in-depth about the differences of playing Clue with a mixture of adults and children, or all children. The difficulties of understanding deduction -- and the competitive motive to hide your methods -- makes Clue frustrating for some kids, especially if they either don't understand or have never had the chance to learn the basics of how deduction and misdirection work in this game.

But enough of that; if I write much more than this I might as well be posting my own review. Anyway, thanks for the added perspectives. thumbsup
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Karl Miller McKimpson
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Regarding snoop, we've found a useful way to make the game a little more thematic though it only works with more players:

Landing on a snoop spot allows you to only snoop a player who is in that room. One player spent almost the entire game trying to "snoop" the other players. The game honestly started to feel a bit like Kill (or Save) Doctor Lucky.

I have to say regarding the rulebook that all the background information that is completely unrelated to gameplay really helped flesh out the characters for us. Adding a touch of role playing to the game upped the fun factor.
 
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