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Subject: Fucking bastard rss

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Snoo Py
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Snoo Py
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Btw this tweet was made in Paris, no less.
Wish we could drop this scumbag in the middle of the fires, that’s the only place he deserves to be.

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Jeff Saxton
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The editor of the model railroad magazine I used to write for was under mandatory evacuation at 4 am today. He's now 60 miles east at some friends, and doesn't know if he'll have a home tomorrow.

I've been to his home several times in the 1990s, there aren't any "forests" around his area to speak of, it's wall-to-wall suburbia.
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Mac Mcleod
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I think they need to surround these neighborhoods with the same concrete wall we use to block freeway noise. They are about 20 feet tall. And you'd need any flammable material gone outside the wall for half a mile. apparently the radiant heat is explosive.

And they could upgrade construction standards to use more concrete and non-flammable materials on the outside.

Mr. "Bone Spurs" Trump was being a dick however.

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Ken
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maxo-texas wrote:
I think they need to surround these neighborhoods with the same concrete wall we use to block freeway noise. They are about 20 feet tall. And you'd need any flammable material gone outside the wall for half a mile. apparently the radiant heat is explosive.

And they could upgrade construction standards to use more concrete and non-flammable materials on the outside.

Mr. "Bone Spurs" Trump was being a dick however.



Yeah, what you're suggesting would do just about nothing to stop the spread of these fires. They jump entire freeways due to blowing embers. When the winds get going, you'd pretty much need to coat the entire area in flame-retardant foam and pray that it didn't get blown away.

There are some things that Californians imported that up the ante - eucalyptus trees basically explode when they catch fire and they were popular in a lot of developments for a while. But the reality is that a whole lot of California is either a desert or very, very dry. When fires start, they will be huge and devastating.

And, for what it's worth, the state regularly updates building codes and even includes brush clearance requirements for a lot of areas due to the risk of fire. It helps some, but can't stop it all.
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G Rowls
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sowe can right off all the tornado blighted repub states in the midwest then because they don't build houses tornado proof?
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maxo-texas wrote:
I think they need to surround these neighborhoods with the same concrete wall we use to block freeway noise. They are about 20 feet tall. And you'd need any flammable material gone outside the wall for half a mile. apparently the radiant heat is explosive.

And they could upgrade construction standards to use more concrete and non-flammable materials on the outside.

Mr. "Bone Spurs" Trump was being a dick however.



A chance to build more walls? Trump should be rejoicing.
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Jeff Saxton
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We better drain the ocean off the East and Gulf coasts, too, to stop all those hurricanes that happen every year.

"Billions of dollars are given each year, with so many lives lost, all because of gross mismanagement of the forests ocean. Remedy now, or no more Fed payments!"
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Bern Harkins
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My wife follows DJT’s Twitter feed, and earlier today we were rage-chortling about this insane grumpa diaper-shit. Allow me to translate:

“Goverment spent a few bucks and it couldn’t contain Nature, so goverment shouldn’t even try. Also, fuck California.”
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JPotter
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I suppose Prince Joffrey would also blame grass fires on poor grass management?

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perfalbion wrote:
There are some things that Californians imported that up the ante - eucalyptus trees basically explode when they catch fire and they were popular in a lot of developments for a while.

Even our trees are deadly. Straya mate.
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Ken
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sbszine wrote:
Even our trees are deadly. Straya mate.


You ever see one go up when they're loaded with oil? It's terrifying.

Something like this:

And that was just one branch.
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Matt Brown
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Also, Trump defunded forest management.
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Andrew Bartosh

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JPotter
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matthean wrote:
Also, Trump defunded forest management.


He has a reputation for nonpayment.

Like most idiot business wreckers, he just demands shit.

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Mack_me_Bucko wrote:
We better drain the ocean off the East and Gulf coasts, too, to stop all those hurricanes that happen every year.

"Billions of dollars are given each year, with so many lives lost, all because of gross mismanagement of the forests ocean. Remedy now, or no more Fed payments!"


We're gonna Drill a Big, Beautiful Hole at the bottom of the Marinara Trench. I make the Best Holes, Believe Me. Trust me, we're gonna Lick this "Hurricane Problem" just as soon as the Obstructionist Dems agree to #FundTheDrain. Let the dwarfs deal with these Hurricanes.
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Walt
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perfalbion wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:
I think they need to surround these neighborhoods with the same concrete wall we use to block freeway noise. They are about 20 feet tall. And you'd need any flammable material gone outside the wall for half a mile. apparently the radiant heat is explosive.

And they could upgrade construction standards to use more concrete and non-flammable materials on the outside.

Mr. "Bone Spurs" Trump was being a dick however.

Yeah, what you're suggesting would do just about nothing to stop the spread of these fires. They jump entire freeways due to blowing embers. When the winds get going, you'd pretty much need to coat the entire area in flame-retardant foam and pray that it didn't get blown away.

There are some things that Californians imported that up the ante - eucalyptus trees basically explode when they catch fire and they were popular in a lot of developments for a while. But the reality is that a whole lot of California is either a desert or very, very dry. When fires start, they will be huge and devastating.

And, for what it's worth, the state regularly updates building codes and even includes brush clearance requirements for a lot of areas due to the risk of fire. It helps some, but can't stop it all.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California#Geography
What I've highlighted is something of a myth--or it depends on what you mean by "a lot". (The rest is accurate.)

We do have a lot of desert--Death Valley can hit 130+F (55+C) with ground temperatures near boiling. The red (BWh) and red-orange (BWk) in the map to the right are the deserts. Few people live in them, and their natural trees are not easily burned. The desert is not where big fires hit.

In Southern California, the fires usually come with up to 60mph (100kph) gusting winds from the high deserts. As the winds descend, they become hotter and dryer--single digit humidity. The deserts are cold now, so the highs are only in the low 80s (~28C).

In one 1982 fire, power lines were blown into a palm tree and ignited four blocks in the midst of a city. Anaheim's fire department and mutual aid were able to contain the fire to those blocks, but the blocks were completely destroyed. At the time, wood shingle roofs were allowed.
https://www.upi.com/Archives/1982/04/21/A-massive-early-morn...

Anaheim used to be a big grape then orange growing area. "Anaheim" means "Home by the Santa Ana river"--not a river by continental standards, but not a desert either.

I'm unsure of the cause of the Northern California "Camp Fire" that devastated Paradise.

The video below shows the major fires burning as of Saturday morning. The fire the woman drives through at 0:20 is burning natural growth and structures. Most pines are not actually burning, shown at 2:50. (This is the Camp Fire, well north of any desert, well north of the bend in California's eastern border.)

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R. Frazier
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Another day, another shitty, stupid statement from one of America's biggest idiots.

Someone on Fox News must have been spewing trash about California and of course he had to repeat the idiocy. He's such a nightmare of a person.
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Ken
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Tall_Walt wrote:
What I've highlighted is something of a myth--or it depends on what you mean by "a lot". (The rest is accurate.)


Ummm, something like 60% of the state on that map is arid or semi-arid. A huge portion of the rest is some flavor of Mediterranean, which also tends to be on the dry side. And the state isn't noted for it's heavy rainfall (and that map is from wetter years). So I think "desert or very, very dry" isn't a myth at all.
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JPotter
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perfalbion wrote:
Tall_Walt wrote:
What I've highlighted is something of a myth--or it depends on what you mean by "a lot". (The rest is accurate.)


Ummm, something like 60% of the state on that map is arid or semi-arid. A huge portion of the rest is some flavor of Mediterranean, which also tends to be on the dry side. And the state isn't noted for it's heavy rainfall (and that map is from wetter years). So I think "desert or very, very dry" isn't a myth at all.


Not my experience spending the first part of my life there, and having traveled throughout the state. Seasonally dry, yes. Which leads to spectacular fire seasons.

Mediterranean climes are dry in summer. The rains come in the fall/winter. Drought years excepted, ofc.
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MGK
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it's worth noting that wildfires only became an annual occurrence in California in 2002; before then, you'd get them every few years or so, but most years the dry season wasn't long or intense enough to allow for really devastating, fast-spreading wildfires

this is a good example of how climate change exacerbates problems we already had and makes them much, much worse
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Walt
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perfalbion wrote:
Tall_Walt wrote:
What I've highlighted is something of a myth--or it depends on what you mean by "a lot". (The rest is accurate.)

Ummm, something like 60% of the state on that map is arid or semi-arid. A huge portion of the rest is some flavor of Mediterranean, which also tends to be on the dry side. And the state isn't noted for it's heavy rainfall (and that map is from wetter years). So I think "desert or very, very dry" isn't a myth at all.
Maybe this clarifies things if you can see the maps side by side?

River map from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rivers_of_California

If you have rivers running through "semi-arid" areas, are they effectively semi-arid? They may receive little direct rainfall, but they get a lot of rainfall by river from the Sierra Nevada ("Mountains of Snow") to the East. Which is why a lot of the most productive farm land is in those "semi-arid" regions.

Also, the Köppen climate areas are a bit odd in some cases. Notice that Csc Cold Summer area extends from parts of the LA area to all of the Oregon border and down to almost back to LA. But while LA has occasional fog, just north of SF, fog is endemic and the Sequoias form in a temperate water-rich forest, but "The tallest and oldest trees are found in deep valleys and gullies, where year-round streams can flow, and fog drip is regular." The Köppen climate system isn't perfect; its more accurate talking about normal continental climates. Further, it's a climate system, not a weather system: exceptional events like Santa Ana winds don't enter into the calculations.

Köppen basically just uses a rain gauge and a thermometer, so it doesn't account for rivers or fog.
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J J
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perfalbion wrote:
sbszine wrote:
Even our trees are deadly. Straya mate.


You ever see one go up when they're loaded with oil? It's terrifying.

Something like this:

And that was just one branch.


Yes. Yes, some of us might just be familiar with that phenomenon... And the related firestorm that arises (and can out-pace cars) when a forest of the things burn. Some of us might even be in favour of clear-felling for quite a distance around buildings as a result.
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