Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
31 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Gaia Project» Forums » General

Subject: Yes, I DO know it's an awesome game,.....however rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I haven't played it yet and I'm not looking forward to playing it.

A person in our (4-5 player) group is bringing it in the next few sessions.

I had passed on Terra Mystica and this looks even harder.

Again, I KNOW it's a good game. I know it's a gamer's kinda game.

I'm going to play it anyway and do the best I can, lots of video play throughs and reading will be needed.

This game makes Trajan look like CandyLand.

You know those memes on FaceBook with the guy sitting at a lemonade stand saying, "Change My Mind!"?

Let's hear it.

My favorite Euro right now is Terraforming Mars. I also like Trajan & Concordia.

Thanks in advance!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Lewis
United States
Thornton
Colorado
flag msg tools
NFHS Football & Basketball
badge
Dread Our Coming, Suffer Our Presence, Embrace Our Glory (Solonavi War Cry)
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have limited play experience with it myself (mostly due to limited gaming time in general), and most of my plays are solo, but I think for me one thing I'd say is, the first play is probably the hardest - trying to figure out the best way to manage resources. There are a lot of things to consider. The rules, though, aren't that daunting - it's the application of when to do what that is tricky, and it is a bit unforgiving if you run out of resource too early.

I don't know if I can change your mind, but for me, the challenge is what keeps me wanting to play. It hasn't quite gotten to the point where it's truly become "AHA!" for me yet, but every game I get a little better with what I have, and I keep wanting to come back for just one more game, even if it's awhile before I actually get to.

Speaking of which, maybe I'll break out a solo game of this tonight!
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Evan Scussel
United States
Longwood
FL
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great game. Of the "new to me" games this year, it's right up there with Brass: Birmingham and Wildcatters as the best of 2018 for me. So much depth of strategy, so much variability and replayability.

Yes, the rules are a bit daunting and you might miss a thing or two on your first couple of plays, but that learning curve is very much worth it. It's a game I want to push to the table all the time and think about what I could have done differently after every play.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Our group maybe plays the same game twice a year at best so this'll be a one-shot experience for us as a group. The owner has yet to play it.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Lewis
United States
Thornton
Colorado
flag msg tools
NFHS Football & Basketball
badge
Dread Our Coming, Suffer Our Presence, Embrace Our Glory (Solonavi War Cry)
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
killerjoe1962 wrote:
Our group maybe plays the same game twice a year at best so this'll be a one-shot experience for us as a group. The owner has yet to play it.

Well, at least you'll all be in the same boat
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Andersen
United States
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
My grandson (age 5) taught me how to play Candyland because he "knew it better than you, Poppy."
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Gonzalez
United States
Georgia
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Terraforming Mars is great. But Gaia Project is my favorite game of all time. The variability in GP factions is much bigger than what Corporations give you in TM. The strategy is deeper. It is fantastic. There's something so satisfying about how variable setup and asymmetric factions feed into an otherwise 100% luck-free strategy game.

Edit: Having said that, if you intend to only play it once, don't bother. The beauty of the game is in exploring the variability and peeling back layers of strategy.
12 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This game isn't much harder to learn or play than Trajan is. It's just deeper and better.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John McComas
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
killerjoe1962 wrote:
Our group maybe plays the same game twice a year at best so this'll be a one-shot experience for us as a group. The owner has yet to play it.


Oh boy. This could be a nightmare in the making with the owner not having played it yet. Like with any medium-heavies, there are quite a lot of intricacies that someone needs to be 100% on...edge cases, exceptions, strategy tips, no you can't do thats...but it's an astonishingly excellent game. Starting from March of this year when I bought it right after my first play, I just logged my 30th play last Friday (with around 75% of those being solo plays), which was also only the 4th time it's made it to the table with my close friends gaming group.

It was excellent...long (about 1hr per player) but excellent and a huge validation of all the effort I put into teaching them over a few sessions this year. This is a big ask, but I very strongly recommend that everyone in your group watch the Teach The Table rules video AND THEN download and read the rules .pdf AND THEN watch the Teach the Table video a second time. This worked wonders for my group.

With GP, I think y'all will find out really quickly if everyone in your group is patient enough for games of this weight. But if you are, you have one of the single-most satisfying strategy games ever devised in front of you.

Addendum: I also think you'll see a lot of subtle but profound similarities with Terraforming Mars (my most played game of 2018 by far FWIW at 60+ plays). Just like in TM, action sequencing is crucial, but when mastered can lead to the kind of combos that make medium-heavies so rewarding. The area control element is also shared with TM, though more important in GP. The produce and then spend mechanic is tighter and considerably more unforgiving in GP, but still functionally the same as in TM. The asymmetric faction design as said above is far more impressive than in TM but also functionally similar in its impact on play.

This all said, what differentiates GP from TM is what largely differentiates medium weight games from heavier games: the existence of knock-on effects that have real impact on play. Everything in GP is tied to everything else. When you do a thing or when you don't; when you pass first or last; how fast or slow you expand; which building trees you focus on and which you neglect; when and where you build; which round boosters and tech tiles to pursue; when you spend down to the last resource and when you decide to be thrifty; which factions your opponents play and which you choose and how that impacts your tactics and theirs...everything is linked.

But basically, if you like Terraforming Mars and are ably prepared for Gaia Project, there's no reason you won't see the brilliance and elegance of the design elements in GP and thus really enjoy it. But I will repeat: if everyone isn't rules ready for this game, it will blow up in your face and never get played again, which I think would be a real shame. There are really only a handful of games of this weight with design elements that are so carefully and marvelously devised and implemented. It's an absolute jewel.
11 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Flo P
Austria
Vienna
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The user above me did a great job in summing up a lot of the things I wanted to reply, so I will try my best to avoid repeating what has already been said:

Terra Mystica / Gaia Project are part of a family of board games that get more rewarding the more you play them. It is the type of game you don't simply put away after you are finished: at its best everyone is standing around the table once the final scores are declared, discussing which moves were the most influential regarding the board state, commenting on each other's mistakes and clever gambits and acting out hypothetical "what if" scenarios. During and after each session you will uncover new strategic layers you haven't considered yet, causing you to reevaluate your heuristical set of rules guiding you through the game thus changing how you approach the next session.

It is unlikely to bewitch you after your first play, especially if you are already opposed to the game to begin with. Seeing how you are all new to it, expect to play 3-4 sessions until everyone really groks the rules and has familiarized himself enough with some of the most basic concepts and their implications (choice of faction, starting positions, neighbourhood, etc.). Once you are at that point, you will start getting to the really good parts mentioned above.

In short this is a game that requires a minimum of dedication of its players to unfold its beauty. Ultimately it is a question of framing this overall learning process: if you are ok with the idea of playing a couple of sessions only to discover what and how you are supposed to do things in order to win, knowing you will be able to apply that knowledge the next time, then you are in for one of the most rewarding experiences modern boardgames have to offer. If this process sounds like work to you and you would rather learn the rules and be done with it immediately, able to play competitively from game 1 or 2, then this game might not be to your tastes.


Bonus:
So what can be done to make the first couple of plays as rewarding as possible?

1. First and foremost, preparation: the more everyone around the table is familiar with the game, the better game flow will be. The game is already an incredible brain burner and likely to cause analysis paralysis, additional downtime in the form of prolonged periods of rules uncertainties can kill off any game.
2. Be sure everyone has enough time: depending on the amount of preparation put into it, the first game will take you 3-4h, likely even more than that. Best to avoid having to abort the session prematurely due to time constraints.
3. Mindset: make sure to get everyone behind the idea that your first game is a learning game and do not try to play overly competitive. Comment a lot on each other's moves during the game and try to help players that are struggling with decisions. It will keep everyone engaged when it is not their turn and cut down the time someone is locked in AP.
4. Setup: Play the suggested beginner setup! I cannot stress this point enough, it eliminates a lot of the variables (building the map, choosing factions, choosing start positions) which, if tuned poorly, will lead to a bad experience. I would even suggest to play the beginner setup 4 times with players rotating through the preset factions before you start with the "full game".
5. Nutrition: as trivial as this might sound, your mind will be occupied, so do not forget about your biological needs. The first game will be long. You will get thirsty. You will very likely get hungry. So order food and provide some beverages before the game starts, else you run into the danger of everyone looking back at this experience as exhausting instead of exhilarating.
7 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
bluesheep wrote:
The user above me did a great job in summing up a lot of the things I wanted to reply, so I will try my best to avoid repeating what has already been said:

Terra Mystica / Gaia Project are part of a family of board games that get more rewarding the more you play them. It is the type of game you don't simply put away after you are finished: at its best everyone is standing around the table once the final scores are declared, discussing which moves were the most influential regarding the board state, commenting on each other's mistakes and clever gambits and acting out hypothetical "what if" scenarios. During and after each session you will uncover new strategic layers you haven't considered yet, causing you to reevaluate your heuristical set of rules guiding you through the game thus changing how you approach the next session.

It is unlikely to bewitch you after your first play, especially if you are already opposed to the game to begin with. Seeing how you are all new to it, expect to play 3-4 sessions until everyone really groks the rules and has familiarized himself enough with some of the most basic concepts and their implications (choice of faction, starting positions, neighbourhood, etc.). Once you are at that point, you will start getting to the really good parts mentioned above.

In short this is a game that requires a minimum of dedication of its players to unfold its beauty. Ultimately it is a question of framing this overall learning process: if you are ok with the idea of playing a couple of sessions only to discover what and how you are supposed to do things in order to win, knowing you will be able to apply that knowledge the next time, then you are in for one of the most rewarding experiences modern boardgames have to offer. If this process sounds like work to you and you would rather learn the rules and be done with it immediately, able to play competitively from game 1 or 2, then this game might not be to your tastes.


Bonus:
So what can be done to make the first couple of plays as rewarding as possible?

1. First and foremost, preparation: the more everyone around the table is familiar with the game, the better game flow will be. The game is already an incredible brain burner and likely to cause analysis paralysis, additional downtime in the form of prolonged periods of rules uncertainties can kill of any game.
2. Be sure everyone has enough time: depending on the amount of preparation put into it, the first game will take you 3-4h, likely even more than that. Best to avoid having to abort the session prematurely due to time constraints.
3. Mindset: make sure to get everyone behind the idea that your first game is a learning game and do not try to play overly competitive. Comment a lot on each other's moves during the game and try to help players that are struggling with decisions. It will keep everyone engaged when it is not their turn and cut down the time someone is locked in AP.
4. Setup: Play the suggested beginner setup! I cannot stress this point enough, it eliminates a lot of the variables (building the map, chossing factions, choosing start positions) which, if tuned poorly, will lead to a bad experience. I would even suggest to play the beginner setup 4 times with players rotating through the preset factions before you start with the "full game".
5. Nutrition: as trivial as this might sound, your mind will be occupied, so do not forget about your biological needs. The first game will be long. You will get thirsty. You will very likely get hungry. So order food and provide some beverages before the game starts, else you run into the danger of everyone looking back at this experience as exhausting instead of exhilarating.


Thank-You! This is awesome insight. Unfortunately, like I said, we'll play it and it most likely will not hit the table with our group for several months if at all depending on the first time experience. One member of our group will be a "NO" for this game (he's already said that) so it'll have to be a time when we know he won't be there which is rare.

After reading everyones replies I think I very much would like this game but will need to find another group with the owner to play it with. Also, a few of our members are "Cult of the New" and we play many unique games and several in one evening.

Only a few times have we played Medium-Heavy Euros and again, that's when one of our members is absent. We're okay with that because we enjoy playing board games with each other but sometimes like ones with a little meat like GP.

Again, thank-you, all!!!
meeple
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Northampton
MA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
killerjoe1962 wrote:
I DO know it's an awesome game
killerjoe1962 wrote:
Change My Mind!
Unfortunately, I cannot. It is an awesome game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
killerjoe1962 wrote:
I DO know it's an awesome game
killerjoe1962 wrote:
Change My Mind!
Unfortunately, I cannot. It is an awesome game.


Yeah, after reading all the replies my mind has already been changed!
laughlaughlaughlaughlaugh
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bokken B
United States
New Mexico
flag msg tools
mb
bluesheep wrote:
The user above me did a great job in summing up a lot of the things I wanted to reply, so I will try my best to avoid repeating what has already been said:

Terra Mystica / Gaia Project are part of a family of board games that get more rewarding the more you play them. It is the type of game you don't simply put away after you are finished: at its best everyone is standing around the table once the final scores are declared, discussing which moves were the most influential regarding the board state, commenting on each other's mistakes and clever gambits and acting out hypothetical "what if" scenarios. During and after each session you will uncover new strategic layers you haven't considered yet, causing you to reevaluate your heuristical set of rules guiding you through the game thus changing how you approach the next session.


You seem like the type of player I'd love to get a game or 20 in with. I love and relate with your after game summary.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bokken B
United States
New Mexico
flag msg tools
mb
killerjoe1962 wrote:


Thank-You! This is awesome insight. Unfortunately, like I said, we'll play it and it most likely will not hit the table with our group for several months if at all depending on the first time experience. One member of our group will be a "NO" for this game (he's already said that) so it'll have to be a time when we know he won't be there which is rare.

After reading everyones replies I think I very much would like this game but will need to find another group with the owner to play it with. Also, a few of our members are "Cult of the New" and we play many unique games and several in one evening.
meeple


I suggest seeing if anyone on the site is in the Pittsburgh, PA area and looking to get together for a game. Otherwise, you might want to try an online game, there are a couple of options including Play by forum and Tabletop simulator.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Bokken wrote:
killerjoe1962 wrote:


Thank-You! This is awesome insight. Unfortunately, like I said, we'll play it and it most likely will not hit the table with our group for several months if at all depending on the first time experience. One member of our group will be a "NO" for this game (he's already said that) so it'll have to be a time when we know he won't be there which is rare.

After reading everyones replies I think I very much would like this game but will need to find another group with the owner to play it with. Also, a few of our members are "Cult of the New" and we play many unique games and several in one evening.
meeple


I suggest seeing if anyone on the site is in the Pittsburgh, PA area and looking to get together for a game. Otherwise, you might want to try an online game, there are a couple of options including Play by forum and Tabletop simulator.


Had it not been for one of my friends in my group pushing the suggestion for us to play this it would've remained on my "nope, don't wanna play this" list. Now that I know we're gonna play it regardless of what I say, I'm going to play this but it's not my copy of the game.

AFTER that I will see if it's a game I want to pursue. Many have already said that it will take a few games to get use to it but if that doesn't happen (and I'm not likely to pursue it unless my friend brings it back) It'll go down as an awesome game I once played.

It'll join the ranks of Scythe (one & done).

Thanks, all!!!!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pierce Ostrander
United States
Albuquerque
New Mexico
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The most important thing in these types of situations (complex game with all new players), is to have at least one person who has completely grokked the rules and the flow of the game.

If you don't have that person, become that person or put off playing the game until someone fully understands play and can "talk through" the rules by topic while pointing to the components on the table.

Suggested Topics:

Flow of Play - discuss the three Phases, Emphasize that Phase II: "Gaia" is part of a 2-part process to Terraform that begins in Phase III with one of the 8 actions.

Terraforming - the three ways to do it and how. Discuss building mines, Discuss the first half of the Gaia process.

Resources - discuss all the ways to obtain, spend and convert them - including upgrading structures, forming federations, Research, Power (charging, spending, gaining, discarding, Gaia-forming), QIC Actions, Special Actions

The Research Tracks - State the two ways to advance, discuss the impact on resources, capabilities and victory points. Describe how to get an advanced tech tile.

Victory Points - be sure and re-emphasize Federation Tiles, QIC Actions and Advanced-Tech tiles, along with all the other ways to gain VP.

Again, if no one can do this yet, put off play.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Gilborson
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I reckon my fave game is terraforming Mars, my fave Feld is Trajan, Concordia in my top ten along with great western trail and scythe. My second favourite game of all time is Gaia project.

Go for it,you will not be disappointed.

If you are all new though don’t let anyone play the terrrans,they may not be op but they are easy to play and that player will likely win
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brett Moon
Australia
Glenside
SA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm not being rude, but that's just a defeatist attitude. You're already doing yourself a disservice. Just give it a shot and roll with it, try to keep an open mind and try to soak up the experience. It seems your concern is because it's heavy or complex. Yes it's heavier than some, but the mechanisms are surprisingly intuitive and it doesn't take long to 'click'. Unlike some heavy games, it's not overloaded with 'exception' rules and you don't have remember a lot of 'if this then that, otherwise something ekse' types of rules. But hey, if it's not to your taste then so be it. Nothing wrong with that.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Northampton
MA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
killerjoe1962 wrote:
My favorite Euro right now is Terraforming Mars. I also like Trajan & Concordia.
I recall you saying this:
killerjoe1962 wrote:
I had a very bad first experience with TM and swore it off. A few months later I played again (with nice people) and I thought it was not as bad as I had thought. Soon afterwards I played it a few more times and became hooked.
So maybe you should consider that your initial trepidation about a game might not be justified... and that if you give a game a fair chance, you might end up liking it.

As someone who also loves Terraforming Mars, Trajan and Concordia, I recommend you give Gaia Project a chance. It's a great game.
3 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
killerjoe1962 wrote:
My favorite Euro right now is Terraforming Mars. I also like Trajan & Concordia.
I recall you saying this:
killerjoe1962 wrote:
I had a very bad first experience with TM and swore it off. A few months later I played again (with nice people) and I thought it was not as bad as I had thought. Soon afterwards I played it a few more times and became hooked.
So maybe you should consider that your initial trepidation about a game might not be justified... and that if you give a game a fair chance, you might end up liking it.

As someone who also loves Terraforming Mars, Trajan and Concordia, I recommend you give Gaia Project a chance. It's a great game.


Oh yeah, like I wrote earlier I will give this game a go, after the first several replies I was convinced to give it a try. I think we'll be playing it in January. I've watched several reviews & how to play videos and now am subscribed to GP page.

Thanks!
thumbsup
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Glenn D
United States
Commerce
GA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Let me put your mind at ease.

I DID NOT LIKE Terra Mystica, my favorite games coming into this is Terraforming Mars, Concordia, Scythe, The Gallerist, and Snowdonia.

I had a bad experience with Terra Mystica when learning it with a new gaming group. Got the two-minute quick-dive, and luckily, pulled off a 3rd place finish out of 4 players. Did not understand the strategy of the game, nor the best way to flesh out the production engine...did not understand the cult track much...and gave up halfway in (on enjoying the game).

Now, I think my lack of enthusiasm for TM is that I am a perfectionist, and it bugged me that I could not properly flesh out "how to play". Rather than just enjoying the ride, I let myself get frustrated.

Enter Gaia Project. The game is being touted as one of the best games of the past year or so, and supposedly has a FANTASTIC solo mechanic. Because it has such close ties to Terra Mystica, I held off buying it. But...everywhere I turned, it's in my face mocking me...I love space-themed games, and this just SEEMED like it'd be my cup of tea.

Long story short, I've been out of touch with the hobby for about a year...and was looking to buy a new game to "re-inject" me back into the hobby...and I bought it on Friday evening. I've already gotten in two games solo, one 2p game. And guess what: I THINK it might be one of my favorite games of all-time. More plays will show, but I am here because I cannot get this game out of my mind!

Here's what you do: Watch this Youtube video first:



It is a 15-minute quick-dive into the basics of the main objectives, scoring board, resource board, and rules dive.

Second, I highly suggest that your group play through a game of GP with the intention that this is the ONLY game you get in during your session. Don't feel pressured to rush through it. It will run longer than you anticipate, but that's not a bad thing. Plan on playing it again the following meet-up, and the game will run 1/2 the time of your inital play-through.

Third, do not expect to grasp every nuance of strategy on your first run. For me it was more less like this:

Rounds 1-2: "Hmmm...I don't really even know where to start"
Rounds 3-4: "Ok, I see where I could've done things differently"
Rounds 5-6: "It's clicking now...let's play again!"

The instruction manual is VERY well done in my opinion, one of the best I've read in recent memory. Around 1/2 way through the first game, you will probably rarely have to look at the rulebook again, except to reference iconograpy. And again, the solo component is utterly fantastic, dare I say...perfect??

I am really high on this game, mainly because it mitigates some of the luck factor of Terraforming Mars (again, I really love TM, but let's be honest, card draw can influence success) and has enough variability with factions, various end-game goals, various tech tiles, multiple end-of-round goals, modular board...that every game will have new "spices" thrown in the mix that I think will keep the game "fresh".

Looking forward to hearing how it goes for you!

/enthusiasm


3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John McComas
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Looking forward to hearing how it goes for you!

/enthusiasm


DITTO! I'd love to read a session report or even just a hot take here once you've played.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pierce Ostrander
United States
Albuquerque
New Mexico
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi Glen,

I have found that when teaching the game, providing a list of the six main ways to obtain victory points during the game (in addition to the two main end-game scoring opportunities) helps people with the "I have no idea where to start" problem.

Gaia Project - List of ways to get VP and game record


2 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
OP here:

Finally got to play GP, it was, in a word, overwhelming.

I come to find out that the owner had only played it once before and we others (2) had never played it before nor had any of us played Terra Mystica.

It's true that this is the kind of game where one & done will not give it it's due respect but I don't see us playing it again anytime soon, it was a rare situation that we played it at all (we have a member who's hardest game they like is Stone Age). Anytime he can't attend we make plans to play tougher games, last time it was my choice and we played Trajan. GP is in a whole other class (upper).

I said after the game that I would play it again but not ask to play it. I most likely won't own this game, it's just a tad above what I call "complex yet enjoyable", it wasn't enjoyable but like I said earlier in this thread, I know it's an awesome game, but will add 'so long as you know how to play it'.

For now I'll stick to easier games like Terraforming Mars & Brass.....wait, WHAT!?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.