Billy Raby
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I think I am at the point where, if I read that a game has a bunch of scenarios, or a campaign to play through, that I am just straight up not interested. I realize I am gonna be missing out on some quality stuff (what I played of charterstone and gloomhaven was fun), but I mean, it’s overwhelming. It’s a commitment that I can’t agree to anymore.

Having modules or expansions seem ok but even then, I am starting to feel like, if your game doesn’t at least have a base way to play it, that I can enjoy time and time again (Brass, Zooloretto, etc) then I think you may just be wasting my time.

Does this change if it’s like a Memior 44 or Zombie 15 scenario vs a full campaign? Maybe, I dunno. I just feel like when I buy a game that I want some variety, sure, but I want to be able to just enjoy the game for what it is, not for what it may be if I play through all the scenarios and unlock all the rules.

Am I just a curmudgeon? Are there too many kids on my lawn?

Related video is related.




 
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Russ Williams
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lestatb15 wrote:
Having modules or expansions seem ok but even then, I am starting to feel like, if your game doesn’t at least have a base way to play it, that I can enjoy time and time again (Brass, Zooloretto, etc) then I think you may just be wasting my time.

A game with scenarios permits this. You can play the same scenario more than once. Ignore the other scenarios.

Quote:
Does this change if it’s like a Memior 44 or Zombie 15 scenario vs a full campaign? Maybe, I dunno. I just feel like when I buy a game that I want some variety, sure, but I want to be able to just enjoy the game for what it is, not for what it may be if I play through all the scenarios and unlock all the rules.

A game with scenarios does not imply that rules get "unlocked". Maybe some legacy/campaign games do that, but it's certainly not an intrinsic part of scenarios. E.g. I play a variety of tactical wargames which comes with multiple scenarios. They're independent of one another. Play them in whatever order you like, skip some, repeat some, whatever.
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'Bernard Wingrave'
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If you have a consistent group that really gets into a scenario-based game, it can make a big difference. Pathfinder Adventure Card Game is the game I have logged the most plays of since I started logging plays in 2004. And probably 85% of those plays are with one group: my wife, my stepson and me.
 
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Many (most?) war games have multiple scenarios with all rules available from the start. Play the whole shebang as a compaign, or pick and choose which scenarios you want to play and replay.

 
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Russell McKinney
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It might just be a case of different strokes for different folks, but I honestly think it's less about you disliking scenarios and campaigns, and more about you just not liking the process of getting everyone together to play it. You could always try to cull the number of people you play a campaign game like that with. Maybe try a two person campaign, since it's a lot easier to wrangle one opponent into a game consistently than 4 or 5.

Or, maybe you just don't like them, and that's fine too!
 
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I wish there are more games which combine it, such as having optional campaigns or modular expansions. For me, the best example of this is Scythe with the Scythe: The Wind Gambit alternative win conditions, and Scythe: The Rise of Fenris missions which can be played in larger campaigns, as standalone scenarios, or by mixing and matching modifiers in regular games. For games with campaigns, I really like when the game really goes for it. Arkham Horror: The Card Game is a great example of going overboard with the campaign in a way I love.
 
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Campaigns can be a sneaky way to get you to play more of a game that you don't like. Usually, campaign games are repeated sessions of the same concept, just with different stats. If you like what you're doing each session, then that's great. But if the core mechanics are boring, and the only reason you keep playing is to see your character grow, well that's how the game gets you to play more of it rather than a non-campaign competitor.

For example, two popular campaign games are Descent: Second Edition and Gloomhaven. If I were to flip through the quest book and play out a random scenario, I would find the game boring because I just don't really enjoy the concept of the individual quest (I dislike the lack of exploration and loot). That means for me, the interesting part - spending XP and money to grow - happens between sessions. To enjoy these games, I would have to commit to a multiple sessions of a game with mechanics I don't actually like. (At least, I don’t like it enough to play repeated games of it rather than other games.)

In contrast, I like Cosmic Encounter, DungeonQuest, and BattleLore: Second Edition. None of these games have any character or faction growth in the isolated scenario, yet I enjoy them. If a campaign were to be built around these games, I would look forward to each session. If you like character growth, there are plenty of games which offer that without a campaign, such as Runebound or Mage Knight.

But if you like campaigns, I just think you need to enjoy each individual session as well. For example, I like the campaigns of the original Descent: Journeys in the Dark. I like playing the dungeon levels because the loot and market system are fun for me, and I would enjoy it even if we just picked some dungeon levels to play casually without a campaign.

I think it works best when the campaign is an option for an already good, non-campaign game. Basically, beware of campaign games where you enjoy the intermission more than the mission!
 
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Campaigns are a bit of a pain because you need to have a consistent group of players who can meet up several times in a fairly short interval before you forget what is going on.

The other problem with campaigns is that if the winner of a particular scenario gets a bonus then they will usually then keep getting better and better and better than everyone else and that won't be much fun.

If the loser gets a bonus so they can catch up to everyone else then there is no value in winning individual scenarios.

If there are no persistent elements then it isn't much of a campaign.
 
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I for myself love games with progress and/or different story scenarios. So imo games like legacy games, Time Stories and Escape room games lifted board games to a whole new level.

Sure it is a commitment to play them but thats ok for me. I think for me its just the other way round than your way of thinking: Im not overhelmed by the one game that has so much to do but by the amount of all the games which are out there.

The entertainment industry offers so much that it is just impossible to get it all and therefore Im happy to be provided with some universes that I can dig into. And I like variation that derives from story and/or progress more than doing the same over and over again.

To compare it with video games: You are a multiplayer guy and I'm a story mode guy.




 
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