Jim P
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But what I do have are a very particular set of skills, skills I have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make me a nightmare for people like you… And I will beat you.
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OK on my last patrol I ran into a situation that could go anyway. First I am in the Mediterranean Sea and I have a few "Encounter Multipliers" to use up. So on patrol #13, yah I know, I decided to use on up. I roll a 4, +2 Mod, to get a 6. So six encounters per combat travel box. Well in the fifth combat travel box I roll up a 12 for my fifth encounter... first on so it is a Random Event, plus another EM for later on.

On my roll for the random event I roll a 5+6=11 Severe Storm, "No encounters occur this travel box and the next." So my question is, do I lose all remaining encounters for travel box 5 and all six encounters for travel box 6?

What I am not sure of is the time aspect of a travel box. In hunters is it a bit more clear as they multiply the travel boxes not the encounters. Here it's the number of encounter rolls per box.

I played it as I lose the encounters and move directly to the third Transit box on the way home. Patrol over. That made the most sense to me.
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michael esposito
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Wow. That's a good question. Guess we'll have to wait 4 Ian on that.

I would play it as you did.

BTW; I never got more than 1 multiplier. Must be nice to have "multiples"
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Ian Cooper
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Hi folks,

That is an excellent question! Never seen that one before.

Yes Jim, you played it correctly.

Here's the deal: each travel box reflects about 3 days of travel. When severe weather happened, it could last for a good few days, hence the "No encounters occur this travel box and the next". So about 6 days of stormy weather.

Now, the key to this is that the actual length of a patrol is not affected by the encounter multiplier - a complete patrol still lasts about 24 days, give or take. Now this means that what an encounter multiplier does is fill each patrol day with more ships - many more targets than usual in each three-day patrol box.

So with a standard patrol, you might usually see one freighter in each patrol box - that's one ship per 3 day period, so two ships in 6 days. With a standard patrol, you lose those two contacts. Two contacts lost in 6 days of stormy weather.

With your encounter multiplier result of 6, you might see, on average, 6 ships in each of those two patrol boxes - so a total of maybe 12 ships in 6 days. It's the same six days of storm, but this time, it costs you 12 ship encounters.

Hope this makes sense.
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Jim P
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But what I do have are a very particular set of skills, skills I have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make me a nightmare for people like you… And I will beat you.
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Beery wrote:
Hope this makes sense.


Perfectly good sense. That is kind of how I thought of it, an Encounter Multiplayer just represented heavy shipping traffic. But wanted to make sure that is what it was.
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Jim P
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mike_espo wrote:
Wow. That's a good question. Guess we'll have to wait 4 Ian on that.

I would play it as you did.

BTW; I never got more than 1 multiplier. Must be nice to have "multiples"


I received the first one on my second transit box in my very first patrol, EVER, in this game. But that first patrol didn't generate any ships so it was a failure.

This patrol was the second using the Encounter Multiplier. I am also sitting on two more. I keep rolling Box Cars in the encounter checks. Though after this coming patrol I will be moving into 1917 with unrestricted attacks and then the dredded convoy.

I will have to choose between patrols with more tonnages vs surviving the war! If he does survive the war I may take this crew into the beginning of WW2 with the Hunters.

Of the twenty or so campaigns I played in Hunters I think only one, maybe two, crews survived to 1943. That game is brutal.
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jasta6 wrote:
Of the twenty or so campaigns I played in Hunters I think only one, maybe two, crews survived to 1943. That game is brutal.


Yeah. With "The Hunters", I used a number of house rules, one of which effectively limited the number of patrols to around 16 (which was the most any real U-boat commander did before he was shunted to a desk job). This, combined with randomized start dates, allowed me to more accurately simulate a commander's tour of duty. In reality, commanders of WW2 U-boats had a much higher survival rate than the crews, who had to serve for the duration of the war. WW2 U-boat commander mortality rate was actually quite low - around 25%.

Compared with WW2, WW1 was easier on U-boat crews. The mortality rate for U-boat crews in WW1 was around 50%, whereas in WW2, it was around 80%. One of the things I'm most happy about with Raiders of the Deep is that (as long as you play carefully) it is survivable - it's nice, I think, to be able to play without that feeling that death is inevitable. I remember playing "B-17: Queen of the Skies" back in the day - there's no way to survive a tour of duty in that game (unless you use my modified charts). With "Raiders of the Deep", death is still stalking you, but you can see the light at the end of the tunnel, so it's not an exercise in total despair.

I've always felt that the possibility of surviving the war gives the player more of a willingness to get closer to the commander and crew on an emotional level. In B-17, the crew of your bomber was certain to die, and I always felt that knowledge kinda put a barrier up between the player and his simulated crew - I never let myself get too close to the crews, because I knew they were all living on borrowed time. "Raiders of the Deep" has a higher survival rate, so you really can let yourself get more emotionally involved in their fate. Another thing the increased survivability does, is that it lets you see what happens after the war. With the extra charts for "final fate", players can see how their commanders' lives turn out. I like to think that, with the "Early Life" and "Final Fate" charts, "Raiders of the Deep" kinda becomes a U-boat commander "life simulator".
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Blake Lindsey
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Quote:
In B-17, the crew of your bomber was certain to die, and I always felt that knowledge kinda put a barrier up between the player and his simulated crew - I never let myself get too close to the crews, because I knew they were all living on borrowed time. "Raiders of the Deep" has a higher survival rate, so you really can let yourself get more emotionally involved in their fate.


I agree wholeheartedly. I just came off about two months of playing repeated "careers" of Picket Duty (2nd Ed.). The game is a great concept and a real palm-sweater, but it is virtually impossible to "play a career" and get invested in it like you would an RPG. I end up "playing a ship," with the crew as mechanisms for fighting and/or saving it, but the crew and officers never flesh out as comrades. And, like B-17, it is almost impossible to complete the entire campaign without resorting to the artificial feel of getting a new command if your previous ship is sunk out from under you (I house-ruled that out of my games). I have yet to make it through the Long Haul.

On the other hand, though, surviving the war was never a given, and the Germans always came across as having that weird, Wagnerian fatalism about it. I was always struck by the last stanza of the Panzerlied:

And if we're left behind
by treacherous luck,
And if we can't return
back home again,
If Death's bullet does find us,
and calls our fate away,
yes, our fate away.
Then our tank will become
an honorable rigid grave.

Knowing you're approaching a probable death can also forge a bond between men, especially if you're part of an elite force to begin with.

Just a thought.

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michael esposito
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Can't wait for Greg's Zeppelin Raiders game...more WW1 campaign/career action.
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Ian Cooper
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mike_espo wrote:
Can't wait for Greg's Zeppelin Raiders game...more WW1 campaign/career action.


Me too! I saw it at the Compass Games Expo. I meant to get Greg to show me how it plays, but I was feeling ill that day, so I ended up pretty much staying in my room. But the game looks really good. The artwork is fantastic.
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