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Subject: CUs in besieged cities rss

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Benno Broiler
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Hello everybody,

I've only played this game once with my girlfriend and we both really like it.

One thing that was quite unclear for us is the sense for placing 2 CUs in walled cities. They vanish after sieging victory and they're too weak for attacking the besieger. So what's the point for that? Why should i let CUs in walled cities (except of rome an carthage of course)?

Thanks for your help!
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D. Branco
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Akrival wrote:
[...] what's the point for that?

The point is for them to survive until the arrival of an allied force to attack the besiegers.


Akrival wrote:
[...]Why should i let CUs in walled cities (except of rome an carthage of course)?

One reason is to avoid overruns.
Another, is to keep a few CUs safe while assembling a larger force.
Three, as Romans, to guarantee that you may place a consul thereon the next turn.
Fourth, walled cities are great pick up and drop off points to Generals moving close to the limit of army size.


There may be more reasons, specially situational ones.


Glad you both enjoyed the game
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Benno Broiler
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Thanks for your advises. Maybe I got something wrong: what happens to a walled city, if there are no CUs and a hostile army enters the city? Can they flip the city just like normal PCs? Or do they need to besiege the city, no matter if there are CUs within the city or not?
 
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Michael Mench
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Yes, they must still siege the city.

Think of the walled cities this way, it helps me. The walled city tile actually represents the area around the city where the Armies amass for battle, AND the area inside the city where the armies or forces can hide out during a siege to await reinforcements and offer minor skirmishes against the sieging forces.

Let’s say Hannibal is moving into Syracusae and it is undefended by any army or forces (an army without a general). The city tile shows us it is fortified (the castle icon), and Hannibal must roll three successful siege triangles. Once he rolls his third, he may now flip the Syracusae tile to its BLUE side. Note too, that now under Carthaginian control, the city tile is no longer fortified making any attempt to recapture Syracusae slightly easier by the Romans.

Oh, a final edit... a city is not besieged simply by having a hostile force there. Only after the first siege marker is placed do the rules for a besieged city take effect. Should the hostile force leave before completing the third siege token, all tokens are removed and the city is no longer besieged. This loss of being besieged tokens can also happen with Strategy Card effects, so keep your eye out for them!

-m
 
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Benno Broiler
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What happens if I lose a battle against the sieging forces? Because I can't retreat, do I lose the entire army?
 
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Michael Mench
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It is assumed that the besieged army marched out in the dead of night to raid the sieging army’s encampment. They become the attacker in this case and may withdrawal after the attack. If they do, the can slip back into the city walls and wait for another chance to fight or to wait for reinforcements.

Same applies to a full defeat. This is rare, but depending on the number of forces left inside the besieged city, they too can retreat back inside the city.

However, the the city falls to the sieging army it is assumed that the attacking force killed everyone in the besieged army... along with as history tells, most everyone else too!

To kick off the 2nd Punic, Hannibal laid siege to Saguntum. Once the city fell, he demanded all adults leave the city. They refused, so he had them all killed. Bad guy, bad War.

-m
 
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Steve Bachman
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An army marching on a walled city can end its turn there and make a siege roll. A single CU in the city is likely to get overrun, but 2 CU can stand up and fight the army. This battle prevents the army from making a siege roll, buying an additional turn to react to it and forcing the attacking army to be activated again.
 
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Andy Latto
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CaptainMench wrote:
The city tile shows us it is fortified (the castle icon), and Hannibal must roll three successful siege triangles. Once he rolls his third, he may now flip the Syracusae tile to its BLUE side. Note too, that now under Carthaginian control, the city tile is no longer fortified making any attempt to recapture Syracusae slightly easier by the Romans.

This is not because the city is less fortified; it's because Carthage is intrinsically bad at siegeing. If Rome successfully sieges a Carthaginian city, it's harder, not easier, for Carthage to take it back than it was for Rome to conquer the city.

This is a place where I think the different dice in the new game make it harder to see what is going on. Carthage is intrinsically hard to siege by either side (-1 to the siege roll). This combines with the -1 Carthage always has for sieging, so Carthage is -2 on Syracuse siege rolls, while Rome is -1. For less fortified cities, Carthage is -1 and Rome has no modifier.
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Michael Mench
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andylatto wrote:

This is not because the city is less fortified; it's because Carthage is intrinsically bad at siegeing. If Rome successfully sieges a Carthaginian city, it's harder, not easier, for Carthage to take it back than it was for Rome to conquer the city.

This is a place where I think the different dice in the new game make it harder to see what is going on. Carthage is intrinsically hard to siege by either side (-1 to the siege roll). This combines with the -1 Carthage always has for sieging, so Carthage is -2 on Syracuse siege rolls, while Rome is -1. For less fortified cities, Carthage is -1 and Rome has no modifier.


Of course I won’t disagree, I was just trying to be... well, briefly thematic.

-m
 
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