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Subject: Chipboard Insert for Cards and Bits rss

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Jimmy Hensel
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I made an insert for the cards and bits, except for the money, for my copy of Tokyo Metro. I used one millimeter chipboard following the techniques shown in Luke Matthews' TUTORIAL: Two-Piece Chipboard Bit Boxes for Board Games rather than foam board because the box is so small.

I made open top boxes (50 x 45 x 20, all dimensions in millimeters) for the player bits and the discs for bicycles, speed tokens and loan tokens to sit on the bottom of the box and a holder (150 x 90 x 20) for the cards and line bits to sit on the boxes.



Here's the game with the insert housed components in the insert.



The bottom layer of open boxes are in the game box.



The insert with the cards is in now.



I've added the cloth bag, metal money and first player token.



Everything else is in, except the cardboard money, and it all fits.



Note: I added this to Ian Noble's geeklist Foam core insert modifications even though I used chipboard instead of foam core board.
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Jason Hunt
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This is so cool! Any chance you'd be willing to make one to sell? I have ZERO arts-n-crafts skill but would love an insert like this.
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Jimmy Hensel
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jivjov wrote:
This is so cool! Any chance you'd be willing to make one to sell? I have ZERO arts-n-crafts skill but would love an insert like this.


Thanks so much for the kind words. I'd love to make one for everyone that asks, but I have to live within my limitations. The harsh reality that I face is the fact that I don't have enough time to do all the craft projects that I'd like to do for myself and my family.

I'd like to encourage you to try to develop some crafting skills. Although foam board is too thick for effective use in the Tokyo Metro box, foam board is fairly easy to work with in making basic insert shapes. There is a wealth of information and tutorials in the DIY (do it yourself) forum.
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Jason Hunt
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pawnpusher wrote:
jivjov wrote:
This is so cool! Any chance you'd be willing to make one to sell? I have ZERO arts-n-crafts skill but would love an insert like this.


Thanks so much for the kind words. I'd love to make one for everyone that asks, but I have to live within my limitations. The harsh reality that I face is the fact that I don't have enough time to do all the craft projects that I'd like to do for myself and my family.

I'd like to encourage you to try to develop some crafting skills. Although foam board is too thick for effective use in the Tokyo Metro box, foam board is fairly easy to work with in making basic insert shapes. There is a wealth of information and tutorials in the DIY (do it yourself) forum.


Well, you convinced me...I've got some of that clear glue and 1mm chipboard on its way from Amazon.

My biggest complaint about the Tokyo Series games are the fact that the boxes are just SO jam packed; hopefully I can assemble at least something passable.

Do you have any specific build tips for that middle tray with the cards/trains? The little divider walls are a bit intimidating.
 
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Jimmy Hensel
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Jason,

Build tips: Read through Luke Matthews' tutorial to which I linked in the OP through construction of the box bottom. Even though Luke recommends against trying to measure to the half millimeter, I did. I cut the sides shorter than the corresponding side of the base and extra half mm in addition to the thickness of the two full length sides (because on the first box the last piece overhung the base by about half its thickness). I did the 45 mm sides full length and the sides for the 50 mm edge I cut 47.5 mm long.

A self-healing cutting mat with a rectangular grid is a great help in cutting right angles. You can align one side with the horizontal lines on the mat and then cut along a vertical line. A cork backing on a steel ruler grips whatever is under the ruler and helps to prevent slipping while cutting.

Cutting technique:

I put my ruler below the horizontal line and the piece to cut above. I positioned my ruler so an easy to see mark (10, 20 or 30 cm). For a 45 mm cut I've positioned my ruler so the 25.5 cm (255 mm) mark is on the 11" line on the mat.


I then put the piece to cut so that the end is at the 30 cm (300 mm) mark on the ruler (300 mm - 255 mm = 45 mm).


Since I'm cutting more than one piece to 45 mm, I place a piece of tape at the end of the piece to make it easier to line up for the other cuts at that length.


I double check the measurement and alignment.


I position the ruler for the cut.


Plan for the insert piece holding the cards and the line bits:
On the base I drew lines to indicate an edge of the chipboard not at the edge of the base. The line is on one side of the board and not the middle so I can see the line while lining up the vertical piece. I placed a pencil mark on the side of the line that gets the glue (and the vertical piece). I scribbled a light green curly line where the glue will be placed.



Except for the little grab piece on the line bit side, I've drawn all the pieces of the assembly. The piece with the dashed green at the ends and solid green in the middle is the piece between the cards and the line bits. The side that faces the cards is up; glue in the middle on this side. The side that faces the line bits is down; glue on the ends on that side.

Starting with the line bits side, I started building like a box bottom. I glued up the base, two ends and the middle cross piece (this one on both sides. After setting the glue bottle down, I placed the middle cross piece, line it up with the pencil line. Then the two sides and the end just like in Luke's tutorial (except the glue on the other side of the middle cross piece). I then placed the piece between the two card stacks and then the remaining end. To finish up I glued the edges of a small piece to place in the line bits area as a "handle" for lifting the assembly out of the game box to get to the other boxes underneath.

Edit: One more tip: I laid down a sheet of waxed paper on my work surface when gluing. The recommended Alene's tacky glue, which I use, sticks to lots of stuff even waxed paper to some degree. It's not too difficult to pull the waxed paper away from the dried glue. So you don't have to worry about excess glue oozing out on to the waxed paper on which your assembly is resting while you put it together and let the glue dry.
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Jordan Draper
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Jimmy,

This is incredibly impressive! I may do something similar myself when my life slows down enough to tackle it, but I'll cheat and use my laser cutter.

Really good work! Thank you for sharing.
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