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Here I Stand» Forums » General

Subject: Excellent Rulebook rss

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James C
United States
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I've read well over a hundred rulebooks for various games.

Without naming names, some make simple games seem very complicated, and provide a substantial barrier to learning the game.

But then there are others which take a relatively complicated game, and make it seem, almost, easy. The Anniversary Edition rulebook for Here I Stand is, perhaps, the best example of that which I've ever seen. (I'm not knocking earlier editions of the rules - I haven't read them!).

The rulebook is organized well and written clearly.
It flows effortlessly and is a pleasure to read.

Critically, important information is exactly where you would expect it to be. Time and again, after reading a sentence or section, a question jumps into my mind - which is thereafter immediately answered by the text that follows.

Although there could always be more examples, examples are provided where most helpful.


Kudos to whomever drafted and edited these rules!

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Giuseppe Tamba
Italy
Roma
Italy
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you should check the italian version!
A true labor of love..!

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Bob Gibson
United States
San Diego (Scripps Ranch)
California
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I would generally agree that HIS is a very well written rule book. However, subjectively speaking, there is some confusing verbiage (to me) in a few spaces - something that I don't think can ever be avoided in a substantial game such as HIS. I had to go through quite a few posts to entirely understand Voyages of Exploration and Henry's Marital rules. It seems evident, based upon the total number of posts on these two topics. I would like to see more illustrated examples within the body of the rulebook. The newer games seem to be doing a good job of including them. It would especially be beneficial to even have a step-by-step video playthrough similar to what John Steidl has provided for Empire of the Sun. From what I've watched, the present videos on HIS are merely after action reports.

Professor X wrote:
I've read well over a hundred rulebooks for various games.

Without naming names, some make simple games seem very complicated, and provide a substantial barrier to learning the game.

But then there are others which take a relatively complicated game, and make it seem, almost, easy. The Anniversary Edition rulebook for Here I Stand is, perhaps, the best example of that which I've ever seen. (I'm not knocking earlier editions of the rules - I haven't read them!).

The rulebook is organized well and written clearly.
It flows effortlessly and is a pleasure to read.

Critically, important information is exactly where you would expect it to be. Time and again, after reading a sentence or section, a question jumps into my mind - which is thereafter immediately answered by the text that follows.

Although there could always be more examples, examples are provided where most helpful.


Kudos to whomever drafted and edited these rules!

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James C
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Bob.Gibson wrote:
I would generally agree that HIS is a very well written rule book. However, subjectively speaking, there is some confusing verbiage (to me) in a few spaces - something that I don't think can ever be avoided in a substantial game such as HIS. I had to go through quite a few posts to entirely understand Voyages of Exploration and Henry's Marital rules. It seems evident, based upon the total number of posts on these two topics. I would like to see more illustrated examples within the body of the rulebook. The newer games seem to be doing a good job of including them. It would especially be beneficial to even have a step-by-step video playthrough similar to what John Steidl has provided for Empire of the Sun. From what I've watched, the present videos on HIS are merely after action reports.

Professor X wrote:
I've read well over a hundred rulebooks for various games.

Without naming names, some make simple games seem very complicated, and provide a substantial barrier to learning the game.

But then there are others which take a relatively complicated game, and make it seem, almost, easy. The Anniversary Edition rulebook for Here I Stand is, perhaps, the best example of that which I've ever seen. (I'm not knocking earlier editions of the rules - I haven't read them!).

The rulebook is organized well and written clearly.
It flows effortlessly and is a pleasure to read.

Critically, important information is exactly where you would expect it to be. Time and again, after reading a sentence or section, a question jumps into my mind - which is thereafter immediately answered by the text that follows.

Although there could always be more examples, examples are provided where most helpful.


Kudos to whomever drafted and edited these rules!

Admittedly there are some rough patches here and there.
But nothing is perfect this side of Heaven.
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Titus Fox
Poland
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Let the amount of posts in Rules section - and their constant inflow after 13 years - be a testament to how a nicely designed rule book can still remain mysterious in its lingo (making natives and non-natives reach conflicting conclusions), prone to talmudic interpretations, and - best of all after more than a decade - make the lead designer and his playtesters go "strange...that never came up during testing"
 
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Daniel Blumentritt
United States
Austin
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I agree, it's one of the better wargame rulebooks out there.
 
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