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Richard A. Edwards
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In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app that unveils the story and directs the enemies.

The game includes six heroes to choose from (including main characters Aragorn, Legolas, Bilbo, and Gimli), each with set starting items, generic basic and specific hero skill cards.

In addition, each player will choose a role (such as Captain or Hunter) which will add skill cards to their basic deck. And then add a weakness card, which dilutes your deck with a non-useful card. Your unique skill deck is used when performing tests and cards may be prepared to allow use of their special abilities.

The app instructs the players as to initial tile setup. These tiles can represent terrain areas of Middle Earth, across which the heroes will travel. They are divided into spaces to regulate movement and range. Also included are two Battle boards and terrain tokens that represent smaller areas in which more tactical battle scenarios can occur.

The app provides narrative story text and interactive sites (marked on the tiles with tokens). The campaign’s story unfolds through the course of interacting with various sites and people, often with app moderated multiple choice options and various skill tests.

A scenario consists of rounds, each consisting of three phases: the action phase, shadow phase, and rally phase.

In the Action phase, each hero takes two actions from among three choices (the same choice may be taken twice): interact with tokens on the map, attack enemies, or travel across the growing map as it is revealed.

Traveling allows you to move two spaces, allowing for interrupted movement to perform a different action. If you move onto a tile with an unexplored Exploration token, you must follow the app instructions to explore that tile and gain the flipped token as an “inspiration” token, which can be used to improve the chance of future test success.

Interacting with tokens on the map often requires heroes to perform a “test”. Tests are based on an hero’s stats: agility, might, spirit, wisdom, or wit. The number of your stat defines the number of cards drawn from your skill deck. The number of success icons then defines the effect, as narrated by the app. Inspiration tokens can be spent to convert “fate” icons on cards into successes.

Items include many things such as weapons and armor, as well as rations and handkerchiefs. Weapons allow you to attack an enemy in your space, or nearby space if a ranged weapon. The weapon card specifies the skill test needed. Like all tests, this is based on an hero’s stats with the effect based on the item abilities.

Attacks can put hits upon an enemy, though these can be reduced by armor and sorcery. Special weapon effects, such as Pierce or Sunder may also apply and the app manages these effects as well as tracking hits on each enemy.

By moving, interacting, and attacking, the heroes explore and advance their adventure goals.

During the Shadow phase, enemies activate and attack as directed by the app, heroes in Darkness suffer Fear, and, as time passes, Threat increases. The heroes must complete their final objective before the threat bar is completely full in order to win the game!

In the last phase, Rally, players reshuffle their Skill decks, then draw two cards and prepare one, placing it into play (a max of four) so it’s effects may be used in a future round.

If a hero takes more damage or fear than their stats allow, they use the app to take a “Last Stand” test that results in their pulling it together and continuing heroically on, or ending in defeat.

If at any time a single hero is defeated, the remaining players have one more turn to complete the final objective before the game ends and the party loses. Win or lose, the party continues to the next adventure in the campaign after gaining any rewards.

The app, in addition to managing combat with enemies and tracking Threat, also plays a Game Master like role. As heroes interact with various tokens and explore the map, the app will reveal new map tiles and tokens and enemies, providing the narrative as your adventure unfolds.

Journeys in Middle Earth is not as focused on tactical combat as Star Wars Imperial Assault. It is a lighter game, with the app using simple targeting and movement directions as well as performing attacks for all enemies. No dice. No cards. No lengthy, varied instructions.

With an unfolding map to explore and a high density of tokens to interact with, the game centers on story and plays fairly quickly. If you want a story-driven series of adventures set in Middle Earth, you’ll find lots to explore here!

While there is thematic combat and plenty of enemies to go around, the combat system is light and quick and tactical options limited. If you’re seeking a combat heavy tactical game, you may be disappointed.

Overall, Journeys in Middle Earth is not just a reskin of other FFG app-board games, but something different in scale and complexity. Undoubtedly there will be new campaigns and more stories to come.

This review was written based on a beta prototype copy provided by Fantasy Flight Games. I was also a play tester for this game.

c2019 by Richard A. Edwards
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Thanks for the review!

Since this game is more story-driven than combat-oriented, what is your opinion on the quality of the story? Is it engaging?

Also, from several playtroughs that I have watched, there are lots of interactive tokens which then require players to use the app to interact with. Do you think using the app repeatedly like this makes the experience disjointed?
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Curtis Frantz
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I was reading the rules yesterday, but had a question. Is it true that an enemy will attack not only in the shadow phase, but will also immediately attack you if you attack and fail to defeat them?
 
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Richard A. Edwards
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Esvath wrote:
Since this game is more story-driven than combat-oriented, what is your opinion on the quality of the story? Is it engaging?

I found the overarching story of the campaign interesting and fitting in the world of Middle Earth, but I admit this is very subjective.

Esvath wrote:
Also, from several playtroughs that I have watched, there are lots of interactive tokens which then require players to use the app to interact with. Do you think using the app repeatedly like this makes the experience disjointed?

There are a LOT of interactive tokens. That’s probably one of the best things about the app. The app can keep the likely results of your interactions secret so there’s a great element of unknown exploration.

It also allows the game to be very replayable since the same adventure might have a different map layout and different encounters each time while events needed for the core story will always show up to move the campaign forward.

I did not think this made it feel disjointed, but rather helped keep the element of surprise and the unknown. It’s a bit like reading a choose your own adventure where you will be guided through a lengthy story but various side events may or may not occur in any given playing.

As long as all the side encounters feel true to Middle Earth, it doesn’t feel disjointed since they’re not directly affecting the main story, excepting that they can take up your time, and provide you with gains or losses that affect your characters.

I think they hit a good balance between following the main story and getting side tracked. There were times we had to ignore interesting tokens to explore because we needed to keep moving toward the actual goal. Another decision point in the game that is important and story driven.
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Richard A. Edwards
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tribefan07 wrote:
I was reading the rules yesterday, but had a question. Is it true that an enemy will attack not only in the shadow phase, but will also immediately attack you if you attack and fail to defeat them?

Yes.

“If an enemy is not defeated, it regains all of its armor and sorcery, and it may be prompted to counterattack.”

You can’t just have all players jump on a group of Orcs and pound them into the ground repeatedly without their ever getting in even a single attack back.

This makes having good defenses really important too.
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What would you say is the average duration of a chapter?
How many hours take to complete the first campaign of 14 chapters?

Thanks!!
 
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Cuberv wrote:
What would you say is the average duration of a chapter?
How many hours take to complete the first campaign of 14 chapters?

I would say most adventures take about 90-120 minutes.

For any campaign, you can do the math multiplying the number of adventures (the announcement for the “Hunt for the Ember Crown” says it has 11) by 2 hours each and add maybe 10 minutes in between each to spend experience and select roles and assemble decks.
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Thank you!!
 
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SirRoke wrote:
In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app...

All I needed to know. Pass.
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Richard A. Edwards
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Sphere wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app...

All I needed to know. Pass.

I don’t want my review to become a “I refuse apps” vs “I love apps” thread.

So before it gets derailed, let me acknowledge the dislike many have voiced about board games with apps.

For a long thread on this topic, see here: https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2139081/why-have-app-board-...

Please do not continue the discussion here.

I will make just one statement about the app since it is an issue that affects this game.

Initially, I too disliked apps and thought board games were important to keep as physical games. I have a large collection and am a collector who enjoys the components. And all tech ages eventually and when the app dies or is hard to find and requires tech tweaks to run, it becomes not worthwhile. And this will happen eventually, even if it takes decades.

But, I have come to realize that playing a game is a rewarding experience in and of itself. Just like playing a friend’s copy but not owning it myself. Or buying a players guide and dice and minis for an RPG but not being able to play without someone with the GM material and adventure books to actually run it so I can play.

I’ve also come to see that time passes and many games I enjoyed for dozens of plays get relegated to the shelves and eventually traded or sold off since they aren’t played any more. Few games get played from my collection a decade after they were added.

So what I consider now is the value I get out of a game based on the cost and the number of players and hours of play.

With Journeys in Middle Earth, I expect dozens of hours of play this year with several friends. That experience makes it worth the cost to me. Even though it won’t last decades in my collection.

Chances are we will play the whole campaign then later this year I may play with another group again. Then set it aside until new content is released then pull it out and play again. Eventually FFG will retire the game and no new content will come out.

It will then sit on my shelf until I need space. Then I’ll probably check and find the app is gone too, though still on my iPad (though it may not run after an iOS update). Then I’ll toss the game in the recycle though probably keep the miniatures.

Yep. The game is a temporary thing. Like we are ourselves.

But the experience of playing with friends! Fully Cooperative because the app acts as an always available GM! With surprises and stories and exploration set in Middle Earth!

I’m going to hook my iPad up to a larger TV so everyone can see the display. And yet we’ll still all be sitting around a table with board game tiles making a map with tokens scattered about and our miniatures showing our positions as we play cards to resolve our choices.

That is what makes this worthwhile to me.

I look forward to the play experience enough to accept the temporary nature of the game. And I appreciate the GM nature of the app enough to forgive the intrusion of a “video game” into my board game world. Honestly, it seems more like an automated AI than a video game.

Nonetheless, I can certainly understand the reluctance of some to participate. This is not the sort of board game that you can add to your permanent collection. And not everyone wants to have to add a laptop or iPad to their board game experience.

I felt the same way about Legacy games when Risk Legacy first came out. I was NOT willing to buy a game that would be destroyed by play! Then my son convinced me the game was worthwhile. So I played it and had about 40 hours of amazing game play with four friends over one summer.

I’ve never debated it again and buy Legacy games, play them with my group, love them, then toss them in a box in the garage until I need space. We’ve never revisited them, but I have NO regrets because I have amazing memories of playing.

In the end, a game is both a collection of parts and an experience. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to value the experience more and more and the physical collection less and less.

Your mileage (and opinion) may vary. But I kindly ask that we close this topic in this review. Please carry it on in other threads devoted to the app debate topic.

Thank you.
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Eric Teoro
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SirRoke wrote:
In the end, a game is both a collection of parts and an experience. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to value the experience more and more and the physical collection less and less.


Well said!
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SirRoke wrote:
Please do not continue the discussion here.

Clearly what you meant was "I'll write my 500 words explaining my position, after which I don't want rebuttal". devil

But no worries, I had no intention of discussing apps further. Had you simply said "let's not discuss that here" I'd have thumbed your post and moved on. That's the last I'll say here.
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Sphere wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
Please do not continue the discussion here.

Clearly what you meant was "I'll write my 500 words explaining my position, after which I don't want rebuttal". devil

But no worries, I had no intention of discussing apps further. Had you simply said "let's not discuss that here" I'd have thumbed your post and moved on. That's the last I'll say here.

Sphere, I appreciate and acknowledged your concern about apps in games. I’m glad my mentioning it used an app helped you decide this game isn’t for you.

I’m fine with your bringing up the topic and since it’s my review, I felt obligated to address the issue you raised even though it seemed more generally about apps in games than about this specific game or this review.

My hope in writing, admittedly at too much length touching on multiple points of the issue generally, was to respond to the issue rather than just ignore it and yet I hope that this thread would not just become a generic pro vs con about apps in games, which other threads cover.

If there’s more to say about this particular app for this Journeys in Middle Earth game, then I think that’s fine to say here.

I apologize if by asking to not continue it I have caused you to feel unwelcome to rebut my comments. That was not my intent. If you wish, go ahead and respond to that post and I will refrain afterwards. I’m not trying to get in the last word, just limit the amount of space and posts on a more general issue rather than the specifics of this game and review.

I welcome divergent comments and anyone reading this, or any, review and considering purchase should have access to many points of view to help them decide if this game is for them. That’s the purpose of reviews.

The anti-app thread I linked to was, in my small way, posted to help point those concerned about apps to read further, in another thread about this same game, such a discussion.

I don’t think duplicating a general discussion on apps in games here helps this review’s discussion and it may derail any other discussions, which obviously I don’t want to see since I do want to encourage discussions about the game and my review here.

Thanks for both your comments.
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A great review by a real gentleman! God bless you for taking your time to share with us your experience with this game .

I have a question : There are some meaningful decisions the players must take that will really affect the outcome of future missions ?
I don’t want to buy a game that I have the felling that “I am being played” and no matter what path I take through the game I will be “ok and safe” without major consequences of my choices.
Again , thank you .
A hug ...
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labalbi wrote:
A great review by a real gentleman! God bless you for taking your time to share with us your experience with this game .

I have a question : There are some meaningful decisions the players must take that will really affect the outcome of future missions ?
I don’t want to buy a game that I have the felling that “I am being played” and no matter what path I take through the game I will be “ok and safe” without major consequences of my choices.
Again , thank you .
A hug ...

Thank you for the very kind words.

And a great question.

While each adventure can feel very different with different map layout and many different tokens and story interactions, the overall goal of an adventure is part of what seems to be a linear campaign story.

Win or lose, you proceed to the same next adventure to continue the campaign story.

Of course your decisions during play will affect your characters in various ways and winning gives your more XP and Lore than losing.

I have not played the campaign completely through enough to know for certain as to whether there are some possible branches, but my experience so far seems to say that there’s just one overarching story and those adventures and their main goals will remain the same regardless of player choices or the outcome from one adventure to another.
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Sphere wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app...

All I needed to know. Pass.

You cannot pass!
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SirRoke wrote:
Sphere wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app...

All I needed to know. Pass.

I don’t want my review to become a “I refuse apps” vs “I love apps” thread.

So before it gets derailed, let me acknowledge the dislike many have voiced about board games with apps.

For a long thread on this topic, see here: https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2139081/why-have-app-board-...

Please do not continue the discussion here.

I will make just one statement about the app since it is an issue that affects this game.

Initially, I too disliked apps and thought board games were important to keep as physical games. I have a large collection and am a collector who enjoys the components. And all tech ages eventually and when the app dies or is hard to find and requires tech tweaks to run, it becomes not worthwhile. And this will happen eventually, even if it takes decades.

But, I have come to realize that playing a game is a rewarding experience in and of itself. Just like playing a friend’s copy but not owning it myself. Or buying a players guide and dice and minis for an RPG but not being able to play without someone with the GM material and adventure books to actually run it so I can play.

I’ve also come to see that time passes and many games I enjoyed for dozens of plays get relegated to the shelves and eventually traded or sold off since they aren’t played any more. Few games get played from my collection a decade after they were added.

So what I consider now is the value I get out of a game based on the cost and the number of players and hours of play.

With Journeys in Middle Earth, I expect dozens of hours of play this year with several friends. That experience makes it worth the cost to me. Even though it won’t last decades in my collection.

Chances are we will play the whole campaign then later this year I may play with another group again. Then set it aside until new content is released then pull it out and play again. Eventually FFG will retire the game and no new content will come out.

It will then sit on my shelf until I need space. Then I’ll probably check and find the app is gone too, though still on my iPad (though it may not run after an iOS update). Then I’ll toss the game in the recycle though probably keep the miniatures.

Yep. The game is a temporary thing. Like we are ourselves.

But the experience of playing with friends! Fully Cooperative because the app acts as an always available GM! With surprises and stories and exploration set in Middle Earth!

I’m going to hook my iPad up to a larger TV so everyone can see the display. And yet we’ll still all be sitting around a table with board game tiles making a map with tokens scattered about and our miniatures showing our positions as we play cards to resolve our choices.

That is what makes this worthwhile to me.

I look forward to the play experience enough to accept the temporary nature of the game. And I appreciate the GM nature of the app enough to forgive the intrusion of a “video game” into my board game world. Honestly, it seems more like an automated AI than a video game.

Nonetheless, I can certainly understand the reluctance of some to participate. This is not the sort of board game that you can add to your permanent collection. And not everyone wants to have to add a laptop or iPad to their board game experience.

I felt the same way about Legacy games when Risk Legacy first came out. I was NOT willing to buy a game that would be destroyed by play! Then my son convinced me the game was worthwhile. So I played it and had about 40 hours of amazing game play with four friends over one summer.

I’ve never debated it again and buy Legacy games, play them with my group, love them, then toss them in a box in the garage until I need space. We’ve never revisited them, but I have NO regrets because I have amazing memories of playing.

In the end, a game is both a collection of parts and an experience. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to value the experience more and more and the physical collection less and less.

Your mileage (and opinion) may vary. But I kindly ask that we close this topic in this review. Please carry it on in other threads devoted to the app debate topic.

Thank you.


You spent more time (in a followup post) specifically discussing the subject that you asked us all not to discuss than you did actually reviewing the game. (Note: I did enjoy the initial review though.)

Still, Sphere called this one right: you posted a massive follow-up discussion to your review explaining how apps are an acceptable part of the gaming experience, and then simply told us all not to respond...(Thus, your opinion is the final one that should be posted here.)

I’ll certainly respect your request and not discuss the virtues of an app-based game - but it’s rather weak to ask others not to do what you yourself did (in great length.)
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SirRoke wrote:
labalbi wrote:
A great review by a real gentleman! God bless you for taking your time to share with us your experience with this game .

I have a question : There are some meaningful decisions the players must take that will really affect the outcome of future missions ?
I don’t want to buy a game that I have the felling that “I am being played” and no matter what path I take through the game I will be “ok and safe” without major consequences of my choices.
Again , thank you .
A hug ...

Thank you for the very kind words.

And a great question.

While each adventure can feel very different with different map layout and many different tokens and story interactions, the overall goal of an adventure is part of what seems to be a linear campaign story.

Win or lose, you proceed to the same next adventure to continue the campaign story.

Of course your decisions during play will affect your characters in various ways and winning gives your more XP and Lore than losing.

I have not played the campaign completely through enough to know for certain as to whether there are some possible branches, but my experience so far seems to say that there’s just one overarching story and those adventures and their main goals will remain the same regardless of player choices or the outcome from one adventure to another.


I think that branching adventure structure is more similar to this than is immediately obvious. If you win an adventure, that is based on your gameplay choices, mostly. And if you win or lose an adventure, there are effects on future ones. So there are gameplay branches, they just happen within adventures, rather than between them.

The effect of D&D - we choose adventures, then play them, then choose another - on modern gaming is massive, and it can trick us into privileging certain decisions over others.
 
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Thanks for the review, I just got hold of a copy of the game yesterday and punched it all last night and had a read through of the rules. Hopefully, I can get a game or 2 in over the Easter weekend?

First impressions for me are that this is very similar to Mansions of Madness 2nd ed (which I love). My guess is, if you love that, then you'll love this.

The big differences, as far as I can tell are:

1. Character (and equipment) progression and levelling between adventures.
2. Card driven combat from a customisable deck rather than rolling dice.

Otherwise, the actions available, exploration health and sanity cards, attributes linked to tests and app interaction seem to be very similar to MoM2. Even the 'clue' system has an equivalent here.

I'm not worried if the game is more about story and exploration rather than all-out hack and slash. I've got Gloomhaven and Sword & Sorcery for tactical dungeon-crawling. The strength of MoM2 and (I hope) JiME is the app. It provides real mystery and anticipation of what's lurking around the corner. Also, not knowing exactly what you need to do to beat the scenario from the start is great.

I have only 2 concerns, one was that this was going to be more Fallout than MoM2. Thankfully, that doesn't seem to be the case.

The other is that (again like MoM2) the next few years are going to include big and small box expansions and DLC every few months! £££££


 
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GreatDebate wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
Sphere wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app...

All I needed to know. Pass.

I don’t want my review to become a “I refuse apps” vs “I love apps” thread.

So before it gets derailed, let me acknowledge the dislike many have voiced about board games with apps.

For a long thread on this topic, see here: https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2139081/why-have-app-board-...

Please do not continue the discussion here.

I will make just one statement about the app since it is an issue that affects this game.

Initially, I too disliked apps and thought board games were important to keep as physical games. I have a large collection and am a collector who enjoys the components. And all tech ages eventually and when the app dies or is hard to find and requires tech tweaks to run, it becomes not worthwhile. And this will happen eventually, even if it takes decades.

But, I have come to realize that playing a game is a rewarding experience in and of itself. Just like playing a friend’s copy but not owning it myself. Or buying a players guide and dice and minis for an RPG but not being able to play without someone with the GM material and adventure books to actually run it so I can play.

I’ve also come to see that time passes and many games I enjoyed for dozens of plays get relegated to the shelves and eventually traded or sold off since they aren’t played any more. Few games get played from my collection a decade after they were added.

So what I consider now is the value I get out of a game based on the cost and the number of players and hours of play.

With Journeys in Middle Earth, I expect dozens of hours of play this year with several friends. That experience makes it worth the cost to me. Even though it won’t last decades in my collection.

Chances are we will play the whole campaign then later this year I may play with another group again. Then set it aside until new content is released then pull it out and play again. Eventually FFG will retire the game and no new content will come out.

It will then sit on my shelf until I need space. Then I’ll probably check and find the app is gone too, though still on my iPad (though it may not run after an iOS update). Then I’ll toss the game in the recycle though probably keep the miniatures.

Yep. The game is a temporary thing. Like we are ourselves.

But the experience of playing with friends! Fully Cooperative because the app acts as an always available GM! With surprises and stories and exploration set in Middle Earth!

I’m going to hook my iPad up to a larger TV so everyone can see the display. And yet we’ll still all be sitting around a table with board game tiles making a map with tokens scattered about and our miniatures showing our positions as we play cards to resolve our choices.

That is what makes this worthwhile to me.

I look forward to the play experience enough to accept the temporary nature of the game. And I appreciate the GM nature of the app enough to forgive the intrusion of a “video game” into my board game world. Honestly, it seems more like an automated AI than a video game.

Nonetheless, I can certainly understand the reluctance of some to participate. This is not the sort of board game that you can add to your permanent collection. And not everyone wants to have to add a laptop or iPad to their board game experience.

I felt the same way about Legacy games when Risk Legacy first came out. I was NOT willing to buy a game that would be destroyed by play! Then my son convinced me the game was worthwhile. So I played it and had about 40 hours of amazing game play with four friends over one summer.

I’ve never debated it again and buy Legacy games, play them with my group, love them, then toss them in a box in the garage until I need space. We’ve never revisited them, but I have NO regrets because I have amazing memories of playing.

In the end, a game is both a collection of parts and an experience. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to value the experience more and more and the physical collection less and less.

Your mileage (and opinion) may vary. But I kindly ask that we close this topic in this review. Please carry it on in other threads devoted to the app debate topic.

Thank you.


You spent more time (in a followup post) specifically discussing the subject that you asked us all not to discuss than you did actually reviewing the game. (Note: I did enjoy the review

Still, Sphere called this one right: you posted a massive follow-up discussion to your review explaining how apps are an acceptable part of the gaming experience, and then simply told us all not to respond...(Thus, your opinion is the final one that should be posted here.)

I’ll certainly respect your request and not discuss the virtues of an app-based game - but it’s rather weak to ask others not to do what you yourself did (in great length.)

I actually agree with you about apps, but that’s beside the point.


You’ll live.
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Richard A. Edwards
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Shatners_Bassoon wrote:

The big differences, as far as I can tell are:

1. Character (and equipment) progression and levelling between adventures.
2. Card driven combat from a customisable deck rather than rolling dice.

I would add that the time per adventure/scenario is much shorter in JiME than in MoM2. For me, that’s a positive. My group stopped playing MoM2 because a single session simply took too long. We don’t have that problem with JiME.
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John Allen
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I have to say you, SirRoke, have written one of the best, most concise yet comprehensive overview-reviews I've ever seen. Thank you.

I just played my first adventure. Love it, BTW. And I understand the rules better now than after actually playing it!
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John Allen
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SirRoke wrote:

I will make just one statement about the app since it is an issue that affects this game.

Well,well said! I totally agree.
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Steve Stanton
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Nice review.
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Daryl Wilks
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Sphere wrote:
SirRoke wrote:
In Journeys in Middle Earth, 1-5 heroes will act together cooperatively on a quest of several adventures set in Tolkien's Middle Earth, famed in Lord of the Rings, against the growing Shadow, run by an app...

All I needed to know. Pass.

Wow, did you really just learn about the app in this review?


To the OP, nice concise review. Thanks!
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