Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
21 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Chit Chat

Subject: Handball rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb


Poll
Handball is
  I'm from Australia/NZ/Oceania I'm from Asia I'm from Africa I'm from Europe I'm from South America I'm from North America I'm from somewhere else
That team sport where you have to jump across the line and throw the ball in the goal
Played by hitting a small ball with your hand
Played against a wall
Played on a court made of squares
Played by hitting the ball at/into the target area on the full
Played by hitting the ball at/into the target area by bouncing it once first
Played by teams
Played by an individual against one opponent
Played by individuals against multiple opponents
Something I've heard of but couldn't tell you much about
Something I've never heard of
      60 answers
Poll created by casualcasual




3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Okay, the people from North America, who play on squares - where are you from?

I'm also wondering about the no bounce/bounce split, and if there's a geographical distribution there too.

I also forgot to ask - although I suspect it's generation - what kind of ball would you expect to use?

When I was a kid, it was a tennis ball. Kids today use a slightly smaller rubber ball with a lot more bounce.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Odious Maximus
Australia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
casualcasual wrote:
Okay, the people from North America, who play on squares - where are you from?

I'm also wondering about the no bounce/bounce split, and if there's a geographical distribution there too.

I also forgot to ask - although I suspect it's generation - what kind of ball would you expect to use?

When I was a kid, it was a tennis ball. Kids today use a slightly smaller rubber ball with a lot more bounce.
Back in the 80s it was played on squares by hitting a tennis ball with your hands. The teachers would refer to the "handball squares/courts" in the playground.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
How big were the squares odious?

I can remember a shift in the painted squares from really little - probably a metre - to much bigger.

But of course in many schools you used the concrete blocks as they were, whatever their size.

In my school we utilised a stairwell and the first landing of it for some squares. You could drop the ball down the stairs, which were a non man's land, into the squares at the bottom, but it was a bit of a dog act.

But i've seen many variants.

All, however, are bounce first, and with a rotating order of squares up to Ace or King.

Actually, one exception - in one variant, you can hit it on the full if you use your foot or head.

Then there are the wall variants, which involve trapping people on the wall when they get out, and then they can catch the ball off the wall to get off it.

I've always been fascinated by the genesis of these sports that we have today from localised games - handball seems to be one of the last school yard games where there are a multitude of variants but it's all recognisable at the same time - but not codified.

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J J
Australia
flag msg tools
Ah....

In my primary school we had two places to play handball (or downball as it was also called).

There was the assembly area, which was a large open square made of concrete blocks that were perhaps a metre-and-a-half square. Given the size of this area, games were generally played 3x3, and larger games were not unheard of.

There was also a large concrete circle on the other side of a building, which was divided into 4 sectors. It was perhaps 4 metres in diameter.

The circle was the prized play area, but you had to wait in line for your turn, whereas on the assembly area you a much shorter wait (larger games, shorter lines, more games in all).

Such fun, especially for those who mastered the art of the low skidder, and those who learnt how to counter it devil

There was no requirement to allow a bounce before you hit it (but in all cases, two bounces in your square put you out); in fact one of my preferred tricks was to merely nudge it on the full, just enough to surprise someone rather nastily.

At high school we played it out on the basketball courts for a few years too (I can't recall if there were seams in the concrete there or if they had to be drawn on). We also play European handball, which I loved.

This was all several decades ago now, but I know for a fact that at both schools (and several other schools in the district) it is still played avidly, and in the same way
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sounds good.

I've got it on the brain because my daughter has started playing at school and is pretty bloody good, out of nowhere. I've been trying to figure out all their rules and terminology secondhand. So I wondered if there was any attempt at universal rules or what have you, and.... yeah, not really. Attempts have been made. They failed. Which is actually kind of good, in my opinion, but disappointing for my daughter who had world championship aspirations. She'll just have to rule the school.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J J
Australia
flag msg tools
casualcasual wrote:
She'll just have to rule the school.


I did that for a few minutes (there was a competition to see who could remain in the king square for longest, naturally). It was great
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
♬♪♪ ♫ ♩ ♫♫♪ ♩♬♪ ♫
Australia
MURRUMBEENA
Victoria
flag msg tools
badge
All reality is a game. Physics at its most fundamental, the very fabric of our universe, results directly from the interaction of certain fairly simple rules, and chance... (Iain Banks)
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

I went to school in Melbourne, primary school was 1974-80.

Handball was another name for a handpass.

"Downball" was usually played with a tennisball. 4 players, all against all. Losing player dropped out, any subordinate players moved up one spot, new player started in the most junior spot. The squares were about 1.2m, based on the expansion joints of a driveway crossover.

There are still at least 6 of them at the school:
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Of course. I read about "downball" and had never heard the term, but there is already another meaning for "handball" below the barassi line, I should have remembered.

Hey north Americans, where are you? Which of you play bounce first, and on squares?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Odious Maximus
Australia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
casualcasual wrote:
How big were the squares odious?

I can remember a shift in the painted squares from really little - probably a metre - to much bigger.

But of course in many schools you used the concrete blocks as they were, whatever their size.

In my school we utilised a stairwell and the first landing of it for some squares. You could drop the ball down the stairs, which were a non man's land, into the squares at the bottom, but it was a bit of a dog act.

But i've seen many variants.

All, however, are bounce first, and with a rotating order of squares up to Ace or King.

Actually, one exception - in one variant, you can hit it on the full if you use your foot or head.

Then there are the wall variants, which involve trapping people on the wall when they get out, and then they can catch the ball off the wall to get off it.

I've always been fascinated by the genesis of these sports that we have today from localised games - handball seems to be one of the last school yard games where there are a multitude of variants but it's all recognisable at the same time - but not codified.

Sorry mate, I had a brief holiday in the meantime

The squares were about one metre, as you say. I never played much myself, but I clearly remember the kids screaming "nah! that was on the full!" They'd get heated about that rule. I think they had grids of 4 squares per court. I think we had the circle on the wall as well, but to my recollection the grids on the ground were where it was at. There was always a big rush for them when the bell went.

What is also interesting is that the school I am talking about was Catholic. When I transferred to a public school for years 4,5 and 6, I really don't recall any handball. At least it was not as popular anyway (this school had a big back field where most of the kids played). Maybe handball is more of a Catholic school thing? I don't know. Also popular at that Catholic school in the 80s was marbles. Again, no sign of that at my public school
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J J
Australia
flag msg tools
Odiousmaximus wrote:
What is also interesting is that the school I am talking about was Catholic. When I transferred to a public school for years 4,5 and 6, I really don't recall any handball. At least it was not as popular anyway (this school had a big back field where most of the kids played). Maybe handball is more of a Catholic school thing? I don't know. Also popular at that Catholic school in the 80s was marbles. Again, no sign of that at my public school


Well, in my childhood... 5 local public primary schools, 1 public high school, and 1 Catholic primary on my side of the river, 2 or 3 Catholic schools on the other side and I don't really know how many public schools, and downball everywhere

Today I asked a handy 11-year-old about her school, which was founded in the early 90s. Yes, they still play downball, yes, the rules are the same as in my day, and yes, the school even has a dedicated downball court, in addition to the good old concrete slabs of the assembly area. So not only is it still going strong, there's definite progress from my day
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul DeStefano
United States
Long Island
New York
flag msg tools
designer
badge
It's a Zendrum. www.zendrum.com
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have played handball at the same park for 40 years. My current core group of players has been together for 27 or 28 years unchanged. We play 4 hours either on a weekend morning or weekday evening twice a week, barring rain and under 20 degree temperatures.

I prefer singles, but others don't so most of the day is in doubles.

Wall first. Blue ball slightly larger than raquetball.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yeah I think that the game's popularity and form is just dependent on the environment, and a little bit of historical happenstance as well. I first came across the game in Catholic schools as a kid but it's present in the public system for sure. But my first (catholic) school didn't have it - all the asphalt was sloping!

My first highschool had tiny courts painted - really small. But they were fading, and people were going to the the concrete slabs. I remember playing with Dad on our driveway at this point who i discovered had been a mean player in his day (60s).

My kids have largely the same rules, but have different names for things, and establish rules at the beginning (can you call for service? can you bounce the ball higher than head height? etc). There are some rules they have never heard of, and they don't have a wall so they haven't even heard of using one.

@Geosphere - that's awesome. Are the rules pretty much squash/racquetball?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
For the antipodeans (that's everyone)



Note the use of head/feet for the ball to be played on the full.

Also the calls of "Intos" (interference).

The school is a private catholic one on the lower north shore of Sydney.

They're most likely using one of these:



Which, I believe, when manufactured by Spalding, is known as a "Spaldeen".
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Odious Maximus
Australia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
JasonJ0 wrote:


Well, in my childhood... 5 local public primary schools, 1 public high school, and 1 Catholic primary on my side of the river, 2 or 3 Catholic schools on the other side and I don't really know how many public schools, and downball everywhere

Today I asked a handy 11-year-old about her school, which was founded in the early 90s. Yes, they still play downball, yes, the rules are the same as in my day, and yes, the school even has a dedicated downball court, in addition to the good old concrete slabs of the assembly area. So not only is it still going strong, there's definite progress from my day
Hmm, that is interesting. I guess the differences must only be according to individual schools irrespective of denomination. I had never heard of downball, though it seems to be the same as the four-square game we always called handball. I hadn't heard of the concrete slabs either. The video casual linked up is the handball I remember, with the only differences being much bigger squares and specialised balls (instead of the humble tennis ball).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J J
Australia
flag msg tools
Odiousmaximus wrote:
JasonJ0 wrote:


Well, in my childhood... 5 local public primary schools, 1 public high school, and 1 Catholic primary on my side of the river, 2 or 3 Catholic schools on the other side and I don't really know how many public schools, and downball everywhere

Today I asked a handy 11-year-old about her school, which was founded in the early 90s. Yes, they still play downball, yes, the rules are the same as in my day, and yes, the school even has a dedicated downball court, in addition to the good old concrete slabs of the assembly area. So not only is it still going strong, there's definite progress from my day
Hmm, that is interesting. I guess the differences must only be according to individual schools irrespective of denomination. I had never heard of downball, though it seems to be the same as the four-square game we always called handball. I hadn't heard of the concrete slabs either. The video casual linked up is the handball I remember, with the only differences being much bigger squares and specialised balls (instead of the humble tennis ball).


What's being played in the video is pretty much what we did, without the servants scampering about. Although I've gotta say that their play style seems kinda tame compared to the methods we used...
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think the concrete slabs Jason is talking about are just like the ones in the video, only in the video they also have bricks between the slabs as opposed to the standard expansion gap.

I had never heard the term "downball" before, I suspect it's a state thing - if i'm right, it might also be related to the presence of Aussie Rules as the dominant football, so WA, SA, VIC etc, because a "handball" in those states is already something different. Might be wrong though.

The specialised ball - the Spaldeen I referred to- is a definite new thing, although apparently it's been in production in the states since the 40s. We always played with tennis balls - a worn, non fluffy one, was best.

Handball in america - played against a wall, like squash, I think, is a bit more formalised by the look of it. They do have national championships and stuff. And presumably a ball size, although I don't know if the spaldeen is it or not.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
JasonJ0 wrote:


What's being played in the video is pretty much what we did, without the servants scampering about. Although I've gotta say that their play style seems kinda tame compared to the methods we used...


Haha, yep.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul DeStefano
United States
Long Island
New York
flag msg tools
designer
badge
It's a Zendrum. www.zendrum.com
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
casualcasual wrote:

@Geosphere - that's awesome. Are the rules pretty much squash/racquetball?


Pretty much.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Odious Maximus
Australia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
casualcasual wrote:
I think the concrete slabs Jason is talking about are just like the ones in the video, only in the video they also have bricks between the slabs as opposed to the standard expansion gap.
Ah gotcha. I was thinking upright slabs. Our playground had a bitumen surface, and the squares were simply painted on.

Quote:
I had never heard the term "downball" before, I suspect it's a state thing - if i'm right, it might also be related to the presence of Aussie Rules as the dominant football, so WA, SA, VIC etc, because a "handball" in those states is already something different. Might be wrong though.

The specialised ball - the Spaldeen I referred to- is a definite new thing, although apparently it's been in production in the states since the 40s. We always played with tennis balls - a worn, non fluffy one, was best.

Handball in america - played against a wall, like squash, I think, is a bit more formalised by the look of it. They do have national championships and stuff. And presumably a ball size, although I don't know if the spaldeen is it or not.
Yes, that makes sense too
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Needle
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Like others here I played it all and we used to run tournaments at school.

Upball
Downball
Wallball

but I also played European Handball.

but my favorite was brandings.

Also when the kid was in primary school he played but they had so many rule break sayings "Cherry, Big Banana, etc" it was not enjoyable.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.