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Subject: Happy Easter rss

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Isaac Citrom
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A happy Easter to our Christian friends.


To our non-Christian friends, Maunday Thursday commemorates the Last Supper which, according to The Gospels, was Jesus celebrating the Passover Seder (ritual Passover supper) with his disciples. The Seder this year was last night.

The Easter weekend only sometimes coincides with the first evening of Passover (the Passover festival lasts a week) because the Hebrew year runs on a lunar calendar, which is 354 days. However, the Torah stipulates the seasons in which certain holidays must be practiced. Thus, in short order, the Jewish holidays will go out of cycle with the seasons, which of course match the solar yearly cycle. As such, every 2 or 3 years, the Hebrew calendar has a leap month. During lunar leap years, there is an Adar A (around March) as well as an Adar B.
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Jon Badolato
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And how the date of Easter is calculated:

Easter is an annual festival observed throughout the Christian world. The date for Easter shifts every year within the Gregorian Calendar. The Gregorian Calendar is the standard international calendar for civil use. In addition, it regulates the ceremonial cycle of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches. The current Gregorian ecclesiastical rules that determine the date of Easter trace back to 325 CE at the First Council of Nicaea convened by the Roman Emperor Constantine. At that time the Roman world used the Julian Calendar (put in place by Julius Caesar). The Council decided to keep Easter on a Sunday, the same Sunday throughout the world. To fix incontrovertibly the date for Easter, and to make it determinable indefinitely in advance, the Council constructed special tables to compute the date. These tables were revised in the following few centuries resulting eventually in the tables constructed by the 6th century Abbot of Scythia, Dionysis Exiguus. Nonetheless, different means of calculations continued in use throughout the Christian world. Universal adoption of this Gregorian calendar occurred slowly. By the 1700's, though, most of western Europe had adopted the Gregorian Calendar. The Eastern Christian churches still determine the Easter dates using the older Julian Calendar method. The usual statement, that Easter Day is the first Sunday after the full moon that occurs next after the vernal equinox, is not a precise statement of the actual ecclesiastical rules. The full moon involved is not the astronomical Full Moon but an ecclesiastical moon (determined from tables) that keeps, more or less, in step with the astronomical Moon. The ecclesiastical rules are: Easter falls on the first Sunday following the first ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or after the day of the vernal equinox; this particular ecclesiastical full moon is the 14th day of a tabular lunation (new moon); and the vernal equinox is fixed as March 21. resulting in that Easter can never occur before March 22 or later than April 25. The Gregorian dates for the ecclesiastical full moon come from the Gregorian tables. Therefore, the civil date of Easter depends upon which tables - Gregorian or pre-Gregorian - are used. The western (Roman Catholic and Protestent) Christian churches use the Gregorian tables; many eastern (Orthodox) Christian churches use the older tables based on the Julian Calendar. There are some anomalies in certain years, but generally it works as outlined.

More info on the ecclesiastical new moon:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecclesiastical_new_moon
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Grand Admiral Thrawn
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isaacc wrote:
The Easter weekend only sometimes coincides with the first evening of Passover (the Passover festival lasts a week) because the Hebrew year runs on a lunar calendar, which is 354 days. However, the Torah stipulates the seasons in which certain holidays must be practiced. Thus, in short order, the Jewish holidays will go out of cycle with the seasons, which of course match the solar yearly cycle. As such, every 2 or 3 years, the Hebrew calendar has a leap month. During lunar leap years, there is an Adar I (around March) as well as an Adar II.
.


Do you know how Christians determine the date, solar calendar? And does the Catholic Church decide the date for the rest of Christian sects?

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Grand Admiral Thrawn
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jonb wrote:
And how the date of Easter is calculated:In addition, it regulates the ceremonial cycle of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches.

Given the antipathy for anything Catholic by my evangelical friends, I'm surprised various Christian groups agreed on the calendar and were not suspicious of the other groups.
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Al Ross
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jonb wrote:
And how the date of Easter is calculated:

Easter is an annual festival observed throughout the Christian world. The date for Easter shifts every year within the Gregorian Calendar. The Gregorian Calendar is the standard international calendar for civil use. In addition, it regulates the ceremonial cycle of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches. The current Gregorian ecclesiastical rules that determine the date of Easter trace back to 325 CE at the First Council of Nicaea convened by the Roman Emperor Constantine. At that time the Roman world used the Julian Calendar (put in place by Julius Caesar). The Council decided to keep Easter on a Sunday, the same Sunday throughout the world. To fix incontrovertibly the date for Easter, and to make it determinable indefinitely in advance, the Council constructed special tables to compute the date. These tables were revised in the following few centuries resulting eventually in the tables constructed by the 6th century Abbot of Scythia, Dionysis Exiguus. Nonetheless, different means of calculations continued in use throughout the Christian world. Universal adoption of this Gregorian calendar occurred slowly. By the 1700's, though, most of western Europe had adopted the Gregorian Calendar. The Eastern Christian churches still determine the Easter dates using the older Julian Calendar method. The usual statement, that Easter Day is the first Sunday after the full moon that occurs next after the vernal equinox, is not a precise statement of the actual ecclesiastical rules. The full moon involved is not the astronomical Full Moon but an ecclesiastical moon (determined from tables) that keeps, more or less, in step with the astronomical Moon. The ecclesiastical rules are: Easter falls on the first Sunday following the first ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or after the day of the vernal equinox; this particular ecclesiastical full moon is the 14th day of a tabular lunation (new moon); and the vernal equinox is fixed as March 21. resulting in that Easter can never occur before March 22 or later than April 25. The Gregorian dates for the ecclesiastical full moon come from the Gregorian tables. Therefore, the civil date of Easter depends upon which tables - Gregorian or pre-Gregorian - are used. The western (Roman Catholic and Protestent) Christian churches use the Gregorian tables; many eastern (Orthodox) Christian churches use the older tables based on the Julian Calendar. There are some anomalies in certain years, but generally it works as outlined.

More info on the ecclesiastical new moon:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecclesiastical_new_moon


Of course, the first new full moon after spring has no relationship with existing festivals previous to Christianity celebrating the arrival of spring.

Because Christianity definitely has core relationships with the seasons and the moon.

The word “Easter” also has no relationship with the Teutonic goddess of fertility and spring – Eostre
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Christopher Dearlove
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einsteinidahosu wrote:
jonb wrote:
And how the date of Easter is calculated:In addition, it regulates the ceremonial cycle of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches.

Given the antipathy for anything Catholic by my evangelical friends, I'm surprised various Christian groups agreed on the calendar and were not suspicious of the other groups.


The formula pre-dates the Reformation, so everyone just carried on using it.

Well, almost. There was the matter of the later Gregorian calendar correction. The Orthodox churches (who split from the Catholic church long before the reformation - though that wording suggests the primacy of the Catholic church which was not so at the time) didn't accept that correction, so their dates are different.

The underlying cycle (which is presented in detail in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer) has a Golden Number that is based on the number 19. Why 19? that assumes that the Metonic cycle - that assumes that 19 solar years is an exact number if lunar months - is exact, but it is actually an approximation. Not a bad approximation, but after 1700 years has essentially decoupled the cycle from reality. Meton was (quick Google) fifth century AD, so not really a matter of theological dispute.
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Christopher Dearlove
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Albatros28215 wrote:
Because Christianity definitely has core relationships with the seasons and the moon.


II've dropped the green text.)

Everyone has relations with the seasons. It's a fact of life even today, and in past times a dominant issue. Ignoring the seasons is like trying to pretend water is not wet.

The moon is hard to ignore in a time when it was visible at all times - it's the obvious cycle that's longer than a day, shorter than a year (or season as part of that year). A week is artificial, a month is natural. (The coincidence - yes, it's a coincidence - of the similar length female human menstrual cycle length also helped make a month important.)

The specifics of Easter date from that the first Easter is described as at Passover, and Passover is lunar based - as is natural in something that old. Of course Easter parted company from Passover probably before it was called Easter. But back in the fourth century that mattered to people.
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Grand Admiral Thrawn
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Wow, interesting. So is there any reason why the early church did not just set Easter on the vernal equinox?
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Al Ross
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einsteinidahosu wrote:
Wow, interesting. So is there any reason why the early church did not just set Easter on the vernal equinox?


The First Council of Nicaea convened by the Roman Emperor Constantine set most of the key Christian holidays upon the existing Germanic holidays in order to co-opt those tribes. The tribes were more concerned with the moon's relationship with the seasons than the split of the orbits or the hours equalizing from day to night.

Christmas is a mid winter celebration, celebrating that winter is roughly halfway over. Christ is mostly likely a April birth, based on the records.

Thanksgiving is more of a stretch but has harvest origins. Note that Canada's, to the north, is 3 weeks earlier.



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Dearlove wrote:
The Orthodox churches (who split from the Catholic church long before the reformation - though that wording suggests the primacy of the Catholic church which was not so at the time)

You could say "split with" rather than "split from" to avoid giving the sense of procession.
 
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isaacc wrote:

A happy Easter to our Christian friends.


To our non-Christian friends, Maunday Thursday commemorates the Last Supper which, according to The Gospels, was Jesus celebrating the Passover Seder (ritual Passover supper) with his disciples. The Seder this year was last night.

The Easter weekend only sometimes coincides with the first evening of Passover

More importantly, this year it coincides with 420.



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