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Subject: [WIP] Mintsugi (Mint Tin Challenge) rss

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Patrick Rauland
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Hey all!

This is my submission for the Mint Tin Challenge https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2247038/game-crafter-mint-t... on The Game Crafter.

It's my first WIP thread so let me know if I'm doing it wrong.

Kintsugi is the Japanese practice of fixing things by repairing them with gold. As a philosophy, it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise.

Mintsugi is a set collection game where items break and you have a chance to fix them to make them more valuable.

Designed by: Patrick Rauland
Illustration by: Matt Franklin

Images


Three bowl cards. Top row is the front. Bottom row is the back.


Some of my prototype cards

Length: 15 minutes
Player Count: 2
Categories:
- Set collection
- Drafting

Rules

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YyH1chSrV58uvXi6-95RYUQv...

I created the first version months ago and have gone through about a dozen playtests. I still need a lot more feedback.

Things to Look Into

thumbsdown The background color on the cards
thumbsdown The font on the cards
thumbsdown The vase cards feel too good when you play for the first time. Later you learn they have hidden weaknesses. Not sure if this is something I have to change but it's been mentioned before.
thumbsdown According to the contest rules your rules must fit on 1 page. Right now mine fit on ~5 pages. cry
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Patrick Rauland
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To understand anything about the game you have to understand the how the pottery deck works, drafting & scoring points.

Pottery Deck

Each pottery card has two sides. The front side represents is the item when it's new. The back side represents a fixed item.

Here's an example card:


The stars are the points at the end of the game.

The little gold ingot icon is how much gold you get when you sell the item.

Playing a Round

Deal 5 cards from the top of the deck into the center of the table. Place them below the deck.

Deck -> brick
Cards to draft -> brickbrickbrickbrickbrick

Each round players will draft 2 cards. This is done in a snake draft format.

When you draft a card can add it to your collection for points or sell it for gold to repair items later.

Ex.
* Player A drafts 1 card
* Player B drafts 1 card
* Player B drafts 1 card
* Player A drafts 1 card

And after each round the players alternate who goes first.

At the end drafting there will be one card left and the card on the top of the deck.

Deck -> brick
Cards to draft -> -brick---

Discard both of these cards. Each unbroken pottery card in play of that type breaks.

This means pottery that's broken can break further and pottery that's fixed can't be re-broken.

When an item breaks rotate the card counter-clockwise so everyone knows it's broken.

Repairing Items

After drafting you can repair one item. Pay the gold cost to the bank.

Turn the repaired pottery card around to the backside and faceup.

Then start a new round

Scoring Points

Count up the points for all of your cards (new pottery and fixed pottery) to determine the winner.

Pottery Points




Cup
A cup is worth the number of stars printed on the card.

Saucer
A saucer multiplies a cup but has no points on it’s own.

Ex. If you have a cup that’s worth 3 points and a saucer that has a 2x multiplier that cup is now worth 6 points.

Plate
For each pair of either new or fixed plates you get the points printed on the card.

Ex. 2 new plates - 5 points
2 fixed plates - 8 points

If you have one new plate and one fixed plate that does not count as a pair.

Bowl
A bowl’s points is equal to number of bowls in your collection.

Jug
Whoever has the most jugs gets 6 points. If one jug is repaired that number is 8 points.

Vase
Vases are worth the points printed on the card. 3 on the front - 4 on the back.

Tea Pot
Tea pots give you points for the cards of a certain color (suit). There are 3 colors (black, white, and clay).

Ex. Player B has a black tea pot, a black cup, and a black plate. That’s 3 black items so the Tea pot is worth 3 victory points.
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Kyle Schubert
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Lookin' good, man! The theme is very intriguing to me. It makes me want to go and learn more about this practice.

With regards to the rules doc, are you able to describe the game play and set-up without using illustrations? Additionally, maybe you could try formatting things a little differently, like removing the list formatting with bullet points and such. I think if you formatted it very simply, and took our the illustrations, you could get it down to 1 page. I had a similar issue, and I've gotten it down to 1 page, though the font size is smaller than ideal, I think it will work.

Also, I have a couple questions about the design:

1. Why did you decide to make it only play with 2 players? Why not 3 or 4? Could there be a solo variant?

2. Why did you decide on the snake drafting as the drafting mechanism?

3. Is the 12 minute play time on your rules doc accurate? Do you feel good about that?
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Patrick Rauland
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Thanks for your reply. Appreciate the questions to get me thinking about different things!

Kyleschubert wrote:
With regards to the rules doc, are you able to describe the game play and set-up without using illustrations?

Additionally, maybe you could try formatting things a little differently, like removing the list formatting with bullet points and such. I think if you formatted it very simply, and took our the illustrations, you could get it down to 1 page.

Yes. Totally can do that. I made those graphics in a hurry. I hope I can make some simple illustrations that can be shrunk down significantly.

I need to figure out how to make the rulebook have multiple columns. That will help a little, shrinking the font will help, and I don't need all of the examples, etc.

Definitely need to work on this rulebook but for now I'm still focused on making the game good.

Kyleschubert wrote:
1. Why did you decide to make it only play with 2 players? Why not 3 or 4?

The very first playtest was with 4 players and it was quite fun!

I'd love to make Mintsugi a 2-4 player game. Right now the hard thing is the number of rounds. The current pottery deck is 42 cards (14 of each suit/color).

That's exactly 7 rounds of drafting where you get to collect/sell 14 cards. If I added a 3rd or 4th player you go from making 14 decisions down to 10 or 8 decisions all game which isn't that much.

The Mint Tin holds ~55 cards so I might be able to get a few more cards in there but I'd prefer to save the space for reference cards and the like.

What I have considered is letting you play with 3 or 4 players if you have two copies of the game similar to Star Realms.

I suppose I could play the game with 3 players and see if they feel like they made enough meaningful decisions?

I could also use micro cards (1/4 poker card) instead of mini cards (1/2 poker card) to get double the cards in the mint tin. I'm concerned about the amount of space for pretty illustrations on those cards.


Here's some test cards I ordered. Left are micro cards, 2nd from the left are mini cards, and the 3rd from the left is a traditional poker card.

Kyleschubert wrote:
Could there be a solo variant?

This isn't my area of expertise. I rarely play solo games - although I do really enjoy Sprawlopolis. I much prefer using games to hang out with friends.

If I did go for a solo version I think I'd want it to be a bit puzzlier! Maybe you have to collect an entire set? I'd need to alter that drafting mechanism.

Kyleschubert wrote:
2. Why did you decide on the snake drafting as the drafting mechanism?

I was playing Sagrada and I love the snake draft. I love how at any point in the draft you have an advantage. Ex. If you're first you get the best and worst card & if you're last you get the two middle value cards.

I'm open to other drafting mechanisms if you have suggestions or modifications.

Kyleschubert wrote:
3. Is the 12 minute play time on your rules doc accurate? Do you feel good about that?

Yep! I'd say 3/4 of play tests end within 11-13 minutes after I've explained the rules.

Although I did recently play 3 games in a row with one person and we had an 8 minute round. So I guess I should do more playtesting with people who have played a few games to get a better idea of the time once you're familiar with the game.

Part of me wants to bake multiple rounds into the game. Ex. Sushi Go has 3 rounds. What's nice about that is you learn how to score at the end of round 1 and then you have 2 more rounds to improve your play now that you know exactly how to score.

Any thoughts on multiple rounds vs playing multiple games?
 
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Kyle Schubert
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BFTrick wrote:
Definitely need to work on this rulebook but for now I'm still focused on making the game good.

Totally. You'll figure it out.

BFTrick wrote:
I suppose I could play the game with 3 players and see if they feel like they made enough meaningful decisions?

If you have time, it may be worth it to try to get in some more testing with a higher player count. I know that generally speaking, a wider range of player counts is more attractive, and could potentially hurt you if the game is restricted to only two players. That being said, if the game is garbage at higher counts, then it's almost counter-productive to promote the game at those counts. If it's a strict two-player game, just make it the greatest two-player experience you possibly can. But if you can figure out how to make the game work well with a wider range, then I think that's a good goal. I know for this contest, the container size is a big constraint. Maybe there is a clever way to fit more utility into a card. I know you are already doing that with the card-flipping mechanism, but maybe you can find another way to make the cards multi-use. The micro cards could work if you were willing to part with some of the background art. It may be worth trying out so you can fit the required components in the tin, if the design can actually support more players.

And I would say figuring out how to play with more players, than fewer, is a better use of your time. A solo variant can wait. ha

BFTrick wrote:
Any thoughts on multiple rounds vs playing multiple games?

Well, there's a couple things to consider here:

1. Playtime
All three rounds of Sushi Go can be played in 8 minutes, where as extending Mintsugi to 3 rounds would in theory triple the play time, taking it outside of the contest's time constraint. One of the designs that I am submitting falls outside of the time restraint. Is that going to lose me a shot at doing well in the contest? Possibly, but I've examined the game, and to reduce game length would mean expelling interesting parts of the design. I'm not willing to do that as this point. So just another thing to consider. You know, what is more valuable to you in the end?

2. Why?
Sushi Go implements scoring systems that make the game interesting over three rounds. Pudding, for example, scores only at the end of the game, meaning you can experience a sense of strategy in a game that is mostly tactical. If you were simply playing three disconnected rounds, my question would be "Why not just play one fun round and decide a winner?". Then if players are so inclined, they can play another game. So if spanning it out over three rounds actually adds a point of interest to the game, then it could be an avenue to explore, but if there isn't an interconnection of some sort between the rounds, don't bother. That's my opinion.

What issues with the design are you working on right now? Or in what ways are you looking to improve the design?
 
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Patrick Rauland
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I totally agree with you on rounds needing to interact in some way. Otherwise just play multiple games. I'm going to brainstorm this for a it.

The main area where I think I can make an improvement is to make sure all of the scoring cards are interesting.

Vase

Most playtesters find the Vase boring.



It's 3 points (which is very good), takes 2 gold to repair, and when you do it's only worth 4 points (which is inefficient).

It's sort of the inverse of the Cup which is 1 point, takes 1 gold to repair, and is worth 3 points when fixed. It also combos with the saucer.

Vases are good if they don't break - Cups are great if they break and you can fix them.

Playtesters don't notice this the first time through the game. And while that's somewhat interesting I think I could come up with a rule that makes the vase unique.

Proposed Vase Rule

1 Vase - 0 points
2 Vases - 5 points
3 Vases - 15 points

Your typical game score is 25-35 points. So getting 15 points from 3 cards is insanely powerful. It's almost, but not quite, an instant win.

Keep in mind there are only 3 vases in the game. So if you collect all of them you are very likely to win.

I think this would make the pottery cards more unique, the scoring is a bit more straight forward (why would I take a vase over a cup?), and the vase would feel appropriately special.

Plates

One other card that often is ignored are the plates.



They're 0 points on their own and 5 points for a set of 2.

On the fixed side they're still 0 for one plate. But now they're 8 points for a set of 2.

There's two problems here:
1) The points are just a little low. Few players take them even though they seem to understand how they work.
2) It's confusing what happens if someone has 1 new plate & 1 fixed plate. Do they get 5 points or 8 points?

Proposed Plate Rule

A pair of plates is worth 6 points

In addition each fixed plate is worth 2 points (on it's own) and 6 points if it's part of a pair (whether they're new or fixed).

So
* 2 new plates: 6 points
* 1 new plate & 1 fixed plate: 8 points
* 2 fixed plates: 10 points

10 points is a lot. But you also have to spend 4 gold and two actions to do so; so I think it's worth trying. I can always decrease the points if this makes the plates too good.
 
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Kyle Schubert
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BFTrick wrote:
Most playtesters find the Vase boring.



It's 3 points (which is very good), takes 2 gold to repair, and when you do it's only worth 4 points (which is inefficient).

It's sort of the inverse of the Cup which is 1 point, takes 1 gold to repair, and is worth 3 points when fixed. It also combos with the saucer.

Vases are good if they don't break - Cups are great if they break and you can fix them.

Playtesters don't notice this the first time through the game. And while that's somewhat interesting I think I could come up with a rule that makes the vase unique.

Proposed Vase Rule

1 Vase - 0 points
2 Vases - 5 points
3 Vases - 15 points

Your typical game score is 25-35 points. So getting 15 points from 3 cards is insanely powerful. It's almost, but not quite, an instant win.

Keep in mind there are only 3 vases in the game. So if you collect all of them you are very likely to win.

I think this would make the pottery cards more unique, the scoring is a bit more straight forward (why would I take a vase over a cup?), and the vase would feel appropriately special.

I think making each type of card unique is a good idea. It gives the players a sense of "multiples paths to victory". In point based games, your scoring system IS the game, and if the way in which each card scores is essentially the same, even if the point discrepancy varies, it still feels like your doing the same thing with every card, which can be very boring.

This is a tough decision though. With only three Vases in the game, how likely is it that any player can actually get 3 of them? Is it likely enough that it gives players the incentive to actually try to accumulate all 3? You also have to consider that the point value of 2 is enticing enough as well, as it will be far more likely that a single player could get 2, verses 3.

Also, if you changed how the Vase scores, will is also have a repaired value? If so, what would that look like in terms of value?

BFTrick wrote:
One other card that often is ignored are the plates.



They're 0 points on their own and 5 points for a set of 2.

On the fixed side they're still 0 for one plate. But now they're 8 points for a set of 2.

There's two problems here:
1) The points are just a little low. Few players take them even though they seem to understand how they work.
2) It's confusing what happens if someone has 1 new plate & 1 fixed plate. Do they get 5 points or 8 points?

Proposed Plate Rule

A pair of plates is worth 6 points

In addition each fixed plate is worth 2 points (on it's own) and 6 points if it's part of a pair (whether they're new or fixed).

So
* 2 new plates: 6 points
* 1 new plate & 1 fixed plate: 8 points
* 2 fixed plates: 10 points

10 points is a lot. But you also have to spend 4 gold and two actions to do so; so I think it's worth trying. I can always decrease the points if this makes the plates too good.

Yeah, I'd say this change is worth trying, as you said. How many cards do players typically have in their tableau by the end of the game? You could also try a system where a plate scores a certain number of points if you have a full set of unique pottery or something like that.

1 plate = 6 points (if) you also have a vase and saucer. (For example)

Maybe that's something to consider. I understand that you don't want to make the scoring too complicated, so maybe that would just muddy things more.

Also, do you have a base point value in your point scale? I only ask this because I feel like having the lowest values possible on your scale makes the game more accessible and elegant. So for example, if a card is worth 10 points, why is the value 10? Why not 9? Or 5? This also lends to the kind of experience you want to have. I generally like to play/design tight crunchy games, so having a smaller spread of scoring values helps with that.

Hopefully this is helping a little!
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Liberty Kifer
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Well for a first WIP thread, Patrick, I think you’re doing awesome Definitely doing it right. Kyle has given some really thoughtful feedback here too! I’m about to pass out but I wanted to stop by and give it a look— I must say, I love what you’re doing with the scoring, so much variety seems like it would make for lots of interesting decisions, it’s exactly the kind of game that I get into. Pretty art, a little brain burn/ puzzle aspect, and a unique theme.

Definitely excited to continue following this one!
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Patrick Rauland
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Thank you both for your feedback! It's very helpful to have someone else's eyes on your game.

I've made changes for the vase & plates so I should be able to get a playtest or two in this weekend and see how they feel.

And I've been continuing to work on the artwork. Here's updated artwork on the bowls card. I got a new version of the fixed pottery (with gold in the cracks). I love the pottery itself but wondering if the gold is too subtle? Especially on a mini card.



(The top row is the front of the card. The bottom row is the back of the card. And you can see all three colors (suits).)


Kyleschubert wrote:
I think making each type of card unique is a good idea. It gives the players a sense of "multiples paths to victory". In point based games, your scoring system IS the game, and if the way in which each card scores is essentially the same, even if the point discrepancy varies, it still feels like your doing the same thing with every card, which can be very boring.

This is very well articulated thanks!

Kyleschubert wrote:
With only three Vases in the game, how likely is it that any player can actually get 3 of them? Is it likely enough that it gives players the incentive to actually try to accumulate all 3?

Here's what I'm hoping happens.

* Round 1 player A takes a vase for 0 points
* Round 2 player A takes a 2nd vase for 5 points
* Round 3 player B is forced to take a vase to prevent his opponent from getting 10 points

But of course a lot depends on the order the cards come up, what else is on the board, etc.

It is possible (12.5% chance) for the vase cards to come up when a player goes first in that round (ex. player A goes first in rounds 1, 3, & 5). But that seems like a low enough chance that players wouldn't build a strategy around it.

I'm hoping it's like the game Morels where there's only 3 Morel cards in the game and you basically have to block you opponent from getting all 3 otherwise they get a ton of points.

Kyleschubert wrote:
Also, if you changed how the Vase scores, will is also have a repaired value? If so, what would that look like in terms of value?

Right now - no. But I should probably add a +1 in there.

Kyleschubert wrote:
How many cards do players typically have in their tableau by the end of the game?


I recently added 3 gold cards to the game which are 0 VPs but give you 3 gold (more than any other card). Before this change players had 7-8 cards in their tableau.

With the added 3 gold cards there's an extra round and you don't have to sell as much pottery to get gold so players typically have 10-13 cards in their tableau.

Kyleschubert wrote:
You could also try a system where a plate scores a certain number of points if you have a full set of unique pottery or something like that.

I had "trophy" cards a few iterations ago. Where you could get bonus VPs at any point by meeting the requirements of the trophy cards. They're similar to the patrons in Splendor.

I hesitate to add too many rules to mini cards. That's the biggest thing holding me back.

Kyleschubert wrote:
Also, do you have a base point value in your point scale? I only ask this because I feel like having the lowest values possible on your scale makes the game more accessible and elegant. So for example, if a card is worth 10 points, why is the value 10? Why not 9? Or 5? This also lends to the kind of experience you want to have. I generally like to play/design tight crunchy games, so having a smaller spread of scoring values helps with that.

Yes - the tea cup is the lowest card in the game at 1 point.

TableForFive wrote:
I love what you’re doing with the scoring, so much variety seems like it would make for lots of interesting decisions, it’s exactly the kind of game that I get into. Pretty art, a little brain burn/ puzzle aspect, and a unique theme.

Thanks so much! And thanks for encouraging me to do so!
 
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Patrick Rauland
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I tried to get multiple playtests in but life happened and I only got 1 playtest in. Luckily it was with a gamer who hasn't played the game yet and she gave great feedback.
Kristie Wirth
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Feedback



Game 1

Playtime: 13:55
Scores: 34 (me) to 28 (Kristie)

* We fought over jugs trying to get the most.

Game 2

Playtime: ?? (forgot to start the timer)
Scores: 28 (me) to 23 (Kristie)

* The vases came up right away
* Kristie took one turn 1
* In round 2 two came up so I had to take 1 to prevent her from getting both

^ This is exactly what I hoped would happen. That if someone goes for the vase strategy you might get 15 points or you might only get 5 and force your opponent to take a 0 point card.

Card Design

I iterated on the design of the game. I love the flower backgrounds (see previous posts) but the colorful flowers distract you ever so slightly from the illustrations.

And the bare branches on one side and flowering branches on the other makes me think of spring & rebirth. Kintsugi (repairing) feels different from new life so I don't want that connection.



Next

In the first game we each had 11 cards at the end. I want to try playing this game at 3 & 4 players. If you had 5-6 cards at the end I think that would still be fun.

One thing I'll experiment with is in a 3 player maybe every player starts with 1 gold (to fix pottery) and in a 4 player game every player could start with 2 gold. This way you have to sell less pottery for gold and you can score more cards.

I need to keep tweaking points. I need to update Jugs. They're confusing right now with one side saying "Most jugs gets 6 points" and the fixed side saying "Most jugs gets 8 points".

I'll just change it to "Most jugs gets 6 points" and the fixed side will be "1 point + most jugs get 6 points". So each fixed jug is at least 1 point.
 
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Patrick Rauland
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I noticed an issue that I wanted to log & acknowledge even though I don't have a solution right now.

I have these little gold icons on the bottom right side of cards.



They represent two things:

1) The amount of gold you get if you sell the item
2) The amount of gold you have to pay to fix the item if it breaks

They look okay on the cards I'm using for prototyping but they don't look great with the final art. They look a little cartoonish and I don't associate gold bars with Japan.

Someone on Facebook recommended using traditional Japanese coins: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_currency

These seem to fit a bit better with my theme. HOWEVER they don't go with my components.

Depending on the price point I'm shooting for I'll use small gold crystals: https://www.thegamecrafter.com/parts/crystal-opaque-gold

Or if I have extra budget use the "Premium Gold Ingot": https://www.thegamecrafter.com/parts/premium-gold-ingot

For the contest I need to use components on TGC. So I'm a bit torn:

1) Do I use a prettier icon that doesn't match a component?
2) Do I use a slightly off theme icon that matches a component perfectly (the premium gold ingot)?
3) Do I spend a ton of time designing my own custom coins on The Game Crafter and have to punch them out (and punch out the interiors of each one)?

Not sure what to do with this at the moment. Would love to hear if anyone has feedback.
 
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Kyle Schubert
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That's awesome you're getting some playtesting in! Keep going! The best version of your game will only be discovered through trial!

With regards to the "currency" problem, my gut desire is to go with the coins. It's most thematic and probably the most aesthetically pleasing. It would however create an extra step of you having to either commission someone to design a coin for you, or you designing one yourself if you are capable. I don't think it would be good to have an icon that doesn't match the component. that little bit of confusion could taint the experience for a player. Obviously going with the coin design printed on cardboard chits would make the most sense.

If that's not an option, the gold crystals could work. For some reason I feel like they detract from the overall vibe of the game. They don't say "elegant" to me, but I don't think I could give you an objective reason as to why. ha

The ingots could work, but they are expensive and you would need to make sure the quantity needed would fit in the tin. Otherwise, the 8mm gold cube may work. https://www.thegamecrafter.com/parts/cube-metal-gold-8mm?dep...
They are probably the least thematic, but are still metal, which is a nice touch, and are $.44 cheaper than the ingot, and likely smaller.
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Patrick Rauland
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Kyleschubert wrote:
The ingots could work, but they are expensive and you would need to make sure the quantity needed would fit in the tin.

Super appreciate your input here.

I realize I really like the feel of components. So even the wooden golden ingot (which is a weird yellow color) might be preferable for me over a token. But I know most board games are totally fine with tokens.

I think I'll have to make a test order in a week or so with the cards, mint tin, and gold ingots to see how they fit.

Iconography

Right now I'm thinking about how easy it is to read the iconography. I updated the set collection points (option 1) for the vase and while it's intuitive it takes a lot of space on a very small card.

I came up with an alternate iconography (option 2) which I think is slightly less intuitive but it takes up maybe 1/4 of the space.



I think I'm going to test option 2 to see if it's intuitive enough.

Play Test Session #13

This was the first playtest with 3 players.

Game 1
* Time: 10:51
* Score
** R: 21
** J: 18
** B: 11
* Played 5 rounds
* J had 2 of the 3 vases
** Then on the last turn one showed up at the top of the deck
* On the last round R took a jug just to prevent his jugs from breaking (even though it won him 0 points)
* Most players had 7-9 cards at the end

Feedback
* Even harder to keep track of whose turn it is
** Need a first player token!
* The tea pots need color on them to make it clear how to score (this is just an issue with my prototype cards)
* The saucer scoring needs to be more clear
** Does it have it's own points? Or does it just multiply a cup?
* Top of the deck
** Sometimes something essential comes up on the top of the deck. It can feel a little bad when the 3rd vase you need shows up there.
** Maybe an action to flip the top card to prevent it from breaking
* Fixing on item a turn
** It felt a little restrictive
** But it also forces you fix things immediately
** I wonder if instead of imposing a restriction to fix 1 item a turn I have a cap on gold. This solves the same problem (people waiting until the end of the game to fix everything). This could potentially also solve issues where someone hordes gold. I haven't seen anyone do this but it could happen.
* Gold felt rare this game which is probably a good thing

Things I'm Going to Change
Based on this feedback I'm pretty happy with the game at 3 players. I'm going to try to get more 3 player tests.

I need to get a 1st player token. There's a Metal Coin on TGC which should be fine (although I wish there was a nice piece of pottery).

I want to try limiting how much gold you can have (maybe 5 pieces?) and remove the restriction of fixing 1 item a turn.

PS is there a better way to format indented bullet points?
 
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Patrick Rauland
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Mark Jindra
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helped me condense my rulebook.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16Os4RprkFE7DpytacYJYNzTH...

If you use two columns and use font size 8 it all fits. So I'm feeling better about my rules.

I've also been working on my mint tin design.



Here's the copy on the back of the mint tin. Happy to hear feedback on the copy. I still need to concisely explain the game.

Kintsugi is the Japanese practice of honoring an item's history by fixing it with gold.

In Mintsugi each player tries to assemble the most beautiful collection of pottery. On your turn you can draft pottery to add to your collection. But beware pottery is fragile and breakage isn't uncommon! To win you must collect pottery, store enough gold to fix any pottery that breaks, and fix your pottery in time.
 
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The Inquisitive Meeple
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Having had a chance to play this - a little feedback both on rules and a note on gameplay

For gameplay - you may want to think about a majority scoring of some kind. Thematically it makes sense a collector would want to have the whole collection of the time. This could be done either all 3 being public goals in collector OR each player get a secret goal - and they score X points is they have that majority.

You may want to also think about slow starts (nothing breaking that someone has on several turns - this actually happened to us) and also gold hoarding.

The actual gold card - it may be good to keep it consistent and add that it gives you 3 gold when sold.


Rules:

- My set of rules didn't say what triggered the end of the game - though I know it is running out of cards.

- What happens when there is a tie is jugs? Does no one score or is it everyone scores

- Does the teapot include itself?

- Does plate pairs include color mixing? What about 1fixed and 1 non-broken?

- Saucer bonus - can you choose which cup to match it with. Can multiple saucers use the same cup?


Hopefully helps

Also, a good subtitle would be Finding Beauty in Brokeness.



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Patrick Rauland
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I watched my first blind playtest and made a lot of improvements.

Blind Play Test

Game 1
* Time to read rules: 12:40
* Game time: 37:20 (including rule reading time)
* Scores
** Z: 18
** C: 24
** D: 27
* D had a hard time understand the snake draft
** The other players walked him through it
** Then Z had a problem with it but they talked through it
* C correctly understood that items cant break more than once
* Z said "sometimes you don't know if you want something to break"
* 28:20 - D pulled out his phone
* 30:00 - D assumed color does something intrinsically
* 31:00 - D repaired two items in one round and no one caught the mistake
* 2 vases came up in the last round!
** D was in the middle of the snake and took both vases so he got all 3!
* 32:00 - C was really torn on choices in the last round (in a good way)
* 34:54 - Z (correctly) assumed that you need a cup for each saucer

Game 2
* Time: 17:00
* Scores:
** Z: 22
** C: 27
** D: 18
* They decided to play a second game on their own!
* Z went with a plate strategy and they all broke in the last turn
* C hate drafted the 3rd vase

Improvements

thumbsup Removed reference to scoring cubes
thumbsup Added a gold ingot symbol to the rules (it's a trapezoid but it should work)
Need to create a graphic for rotating cards
thumbsup I made the "repairing items" section more intuitive
thumbsup I added rules for ties with jugs
thumbsup I added rules for gold
thumbsup I added rules for first player
 
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Kyle Schubert
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Looking good, Patrick! Sounds like you're making progress. Pumped for you! I'm excited to see your shop page once it's up. I think there's going to be a lot of really good designs, and it's going to be tough for both the community vote and the judges vote.
 
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Patrick Rauland
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Kyleschubert wrote:
Looking good, Patrick! Sounds like you're making progress. Pumped for you! I'm excited to see your shop page once it's up. I think there's going to be a lot of really good designs, and it's going to be tough for both the community vote and the judges vote.

Thanks! And I agree. There are so many good looking mint tin games on BGG, Facebook, Twitter, etc. And I'm sure there are a bunch I haven't seen that are going to be amazing. heart

But a good problem to have right?
 
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Patrick Rauland
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I started working on stickers for the inside of the mint tin.



These are primarily for reference.

The left is a game summary. I definitely need to change the header, make the font more readable, maybe change the background, etc.

And the right is a list of cards so you have an idea how rare every card is.

Any thoughts on these?
 
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Patrick Rauland
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Getting some illustrations for Mintsugi. I think they look pretty good in the card frames I designed.



Thoughts?
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Patrick Rauland
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Ordered my first copy from The Game Crafter. Should be able to pick it up at Protospiel Madison. meeple

I'm going to start working on some better graphics for the rulebook and start working on the product page on TGC.
 
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Corry Damey
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This looks incredible. I love the cup illustrations and how they look against a nice, simple layout. Seems thematic!

My only criticism is that the gold on the cups look a little strange. The beveled highlights are quite dull and the shadow effect on the gold veins makes it feel like it's floating just off the cups; not flush to the surface. I'd suggest either a sharper contrast (in hue and blending) between the highlight and shaded areas of the gold or even a gold leaf image overlaying the veins.

All in all, this looks really great!
 
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Patrick Rauland
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Thanks Corry!

I recently made an order for a prototype so I'm going to see how the illustrations look when printed and might make some adjustments after that. I'll keep you comments in mind!
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Patrick Rauland
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I officially submitted Mintsugi to mint tin contest on The Game Crafter: https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/mintsugi

I still have a lot of work to do on the product page. Most importantly adding a how to play video.

And this weekend I have Protospiel Madison so will have a good opportunity for massive testing / tweaking.
 
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