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Subject: Three player rules? rss

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Mark Crane
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My son wants to try out his killer deck against me and my brother. Are there three player rules out there? And are there limits on deck sizes?
 
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W. Eric Martin
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Wizards of the Coast does have rules for team games in addition to the standard two-player game, but I don't think they've ever released rules for three players. You can explore the official rules at http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=magic/rules

Eric
Editor, http://www.BoardgameNews.com
 
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Garcian Smith
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My friends and I just use the Hunter rule. Player A has to kill Player B before getting killed by Player C. Whoever kills their prey first wins. 60 min deck size and anything goes.
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W. Eric Martin
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Sorry, I should have added that in my experience you have two ways to go: either play a free-for-all in which a player can attack both other players with his creatures, or play attack-to-the-left (or right) in which you can direct spells at anyone but attack with your creatures only to the left (or right). In either case, once one player is knocked out, the game reverts to a standard two-player game.

No matter how you choose to play, I'd stick with minimum 60-card decks, which is the minimum size for constructed decks in tournament play.
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Mark Crane
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Thanks very much! Is there a maximum deck limit? Or should we all have equal sized decks?
 
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Michael Nerman
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There is no maximum, but 99% of the time, smaller decks are stronger and more fun. More cards means more of a chance of getting the wrong cards at the wrong time.

My favourite way to play three player is that players can only attack to the left, but can play spells on anyone, and when someone loses, the player sitting to the right of that player (their predator) gains five life and gets to draw two cards to help them kill the third person.

Four players has a lot more interesting choices, such as two-headed giant.
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Jeff Wiles
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nerman8r wrote:
There is no maximum, but 99% of the time, smaller decks are stronger and more fun.


They're more consistent, but whether they are stronger and/or more fun is an argument for another thread.


nerman8r wrote:
More cards means more of a chance of getting the wrong cards at the wrong time.

My favourite way to play three player is that players can only attack to the left, but can play spells on anyone, and when someone loses, the player sitting to the right of that player (their predator) gains five life and gets to draw two cards to help them kill the third person.

Four players has a lot more interesting choices, such as two-headed giant.


My favorite way to play multiplayer is: Spells can target anyone (no direction restriction or range restriction) and creatures can attack anyone (and if you have multiple creatures, you can send some at Player A and some at Player B - you just designate which ones are going in each direction at the time you declare them to be attacking). Last geek standing wins.

 
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Jason Cheng
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jeffwiles wrote:
nerman8r wrote:
There is no maximum, but 99% of the time, smaller decks are stronger and more fun.


They're more consistent, but whether they are stronger and/or more fun is an argument for another thread.


Yeah, I'm going to disagree on the fun aspect as well. When I used to play 8 years ago, I loved putting all my quirky and rare cards in a big deck. It's the best way to play emperor (I love forking my own time walk or time twister).
 
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Robin Ashby
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I've been having a lot of fun with a static card pool 3-player draft. The rules we use are like the ones jeff describes, except you can only attack one player on a given turn.
 
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Mark McEvoy
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jeffwiles wrote:
My favorite way to play multiplayer is: Spells can target anyone (no direction restriction or range restriction) and creatures can attack anyone (and if you have multiple creatures, you can send some at Player A and some at Player B - you just designate which ones are going in each direction at the time you declare them to be attacking). Last geek standing wins.


In my experience, this just leads to the most defensive deck winning. If one player quickly sets up defenses, the other two are going to attack one another (the comparatively defenseless) rather than waste time taking on the deck with the defenses. After the other two players whittle each other down or one takes the other one out, then the defensive deck has usually become completely impenetrable and his victory is eventual.


Predator-Prey attack limitations have their problems, but at least they don't seem to drive players to make defensive/stalling decks that make a game last forever and be fun for hardly anyone.
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Robin Ashby
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thatmarkguy wrote:
jeffwiles wrote:
My favorite way to play multiplayer is: Spells can target anyone (no direction restriction or range restriction) and creatures can attack anyone (and if you have multiple creatures, you can send some at Player A and some at Player B - you just designate which ones are going in each direction at the time you declare them to be attacking). Last geek standing wins.


In my experience, this just leads to the most defensive deck winning. If one player quickly sets up defenses, the other two are going to attack one another (the comparatively defenseless) rather than waste time taking on the deck with the defenses. After the other two players whittle each other down or one takes the other one out, then the defensive deck has usually become completely impenetrable and his victory is eventual.


Predator-Prey attack limitations have their problems, but at least they don't seem to drive players to make defensive/stalling decks that make a game last forever and be fun for hardly anyone.


Hmm, interesting. We've encounered that problem too, it warps the game into ultra-defensive decks, and decks designed to deal with defensive decks. I'll try the attack-left/spells-target-anyone rules next time, or is there a better option?
 
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Jorge Montero
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thatmarkguy wrote:
jeffwiles wrote:
My favorite way to play multiplayer is: Spells can target anyone (no direction restriction or range restriction) and creatures can attack anyone (and if you have multiple creatures, you can send some at Player A and some at Player B - you just designate which ones are going in each direction at the time you declare them to be attacking). Last geek standing wins.


In my experience, this just leads to the most defensive deck winning. If one player quickly sets up defenses, the other two are going to attack one another (the comparatively defenseless) rather than waste time taking on the deck with the defenses. After the other two players whittle each other down or one takes the other one out, then the defensive deck has usually become completely impenetrable and his victory is eventual.


Predator-Prey attack limitations have their problems, but at least they don't seem to drive players to make defensive/stalling decks that make a game last forever and be fun for hardly anyone.


In my experience, it's the opposite: The other two players realize that they don't have a prayer against the defensive deck if they lose a bunch of life points, and team up against him.
 
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Jeff Wiles
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hibikir wrote:
thatmarkguy wrote:
jeffwiles wrote:
My favorite way to play multiplayer is: Spells can target anyone (no direction restriction or range restriction) and creatures can attack anyone (and if you have multiple creatures, you can send some at Player A and some at Player B - you just designate which ones are going in each direction at the time you declare them to be attacking). Last geek standing wins.


In my experience, this just leads to the most defensive deck winning. If one player quickly sets up defenses, the other two are going to attack one another (the comparatively defenseless) rather than waste time taking on the deck with the defenses. After the other two players whittle each other down or one takes the other one out, then the defensive deck has usually become completely impenetrable and his victory is eventual.


Predator-Prey attack limitations have their problems, but at least they don't seem to drive players to make defensive/stalling decks that make a game last forever and be fun for hardly anyone.


In my experience, it's the opposite: The other two players realize that they don't have a prayer against the defensive deck if they lose a bunch of life points, and team up against him.


It's all highly dependent on the local metagame/groupthink. I know players who simply refuse to play defensive decks.
 
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Mark McEvoy
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hibikir wrote:
In my experience, it's the opposite: The other two players realize that they don't have a prayer against the defensive deck if they lose a bunch of life points, and team up against him.


If I have a bunch of 1/1, 2/2, 3/3 creatures, and one opponent has some walls / low-power-high-toughness creatures and Quicksand/MazeOfIth or whatnot... attacking him with creatures will be futile. That's where the problem lies - you can focus your spells at him all you want, but if he makes it futile for either opponent to launch a creature attack, then he'll be mostly impenetrable. You can't 'combine forces' for an assault on a single turn. The wall that blocks your biggest creature will still be around to block the other guy's biggest creature as well.
 
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Doug Buel
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If you've never played multiplayer, Attack Left is probably a better option than Free-For-All, because you eliminate a lot of the politics from the game.

Multiplayer is a lot like Two Player, with the some exceptions:


The first player goes ahead and draws a card for his first turn. In a Two Player game, the first player has to skip his draw for his first turn.

When you declare attackers in a Free-For-All game, you must declare all your attacks against both players at once. Any card referencing the "Defending Player" is only referring to a player actually attacked. Of course, in an Attack Left game, you always only create one Defending Player when you attack.

If a player is eliminated from the game, all his control effects end (that means if he stole a creature from you somehow, you get it back), and then all his stuff is removed from the game. This includes any spells or abilities on the stack. That means that if he was about to kill you, and you kill him in response, his spell that was about to kill you won't resolve.
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Garcian Smith
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I have it so the game ends immediately after one player loses. I guess it has it so that the player that isn't doing anything has to try to keep their attacker alive, so that the person that they have to attack doesn't win.
 
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Jay Treat
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Three-Headed In-Fighting (and other three-player game formats)
http://goblinartisans.blogspot.com/2016/11/three-headed-in-f...
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