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Subject: Getting Your Share of the Tourist Dollar rss

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Matt
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Paris, like any thriving city that hosts thousands of tourists ever year, has its share of entrepreneurs that are looking to get their share of the tourist dollar. The best way to do that of course is to build business that are convienent for tourists that visit the city.

Since tourists choose to take bus tours when visiting a new city, it’s a good idea for the budding businessman to know the bus routes and stops frequented by these tour buses. Placing a business along these routes can be very profitable, which is what Paris Paris is all about. In this game, you and your opponents are trying to build businesses that will profit from the various tour bus companies that travel the city.

In the beginning of the game, each player randomly chooses a bus route tile. This is kept secret from all other players and will reward you extra points at the end of the game. There are other tiles that have the names of various locations in Paris. These names match various locations on the board, which is a street map of Paris. Each location is a bus stop. These tiles are stacked in several piles.

On a players turn, the player chooses a stack of tiles, and places them on the corresponding spots on the board. Then that player places a business on one of the spaces on the board that has a tile. Each player will place a business at each location that there is a tile. There will be one tile left over and that tile is called a small tour. If there is a business at that spot, then that player scores a point. If there is no business at that spot, then the closest business to that spot scores a point. After scoring is done for the small tour, the tile is place in the Grand tour space on the board. Then next player chooses a stack of tiles, and play continues. As soon as there are two tiles of the same color in the Grand Tour space, a grand tour occurs. All business along that color route then score points.

There can only be two businesses on an intersection and only one business on spots that are not crossings. A player can displace a business that is already there by taking that business token and putting in the bag where it will remain until the end of the game. The good thing about this is that you are depleting the other player’s businesses that he has to place on the board. However, the drawback to doing this is that the opponent with the most businesses in the bag at the end of the game scores additional points. If there is a tie of businesses in the bag, nobody gets the extra points.

At the end of the game, when there are no more tiles to place on the board, players reveal their bus route tiles that they received at the beginning of the game. A grand tour occurs along each of those routes. Scoring is the same as a Grand Tour during the game. Then the business tokens are taken out of the bag. The player with the most business tokens in the bag scores an additional point for each token. The player with the most points at the end of the game wins.

This is a quick game. We played two games in about 45 minutes or so. There is some luck involved as far as the tiles are concerned, but there is strategy as well. Placing businesses at intersections is a good idea because you have a better chance scoring points where two bus lines intersect than if you had a business at a stop that was not an intersection. You also have opportunities to create or stall a grand tour on your turn. You may want a grand tour to occur if you have business along that tour route, on the other hand, you have the ability of stalling a grand tour for an opponent as well by not letting a matching color tile make it to the grand tour space during your turn.

Another point to keep in mind is removing opponents businesses out of the game and placing them in the bag. If you do this too much, you will actually be helping one opponent gain extra points at the end of the game. And it may just be enough points for an opponent to win.

I liked this game. Its simple to learn and it’s a game that is for gamers and non-gamers alike. Since I only played the game twice on the same day, I really don’t know if the randomness of the tiles outweighs the strategy aspect of the game. That would be something that would become more apparent with more plays. But for now, I would say to give the game a try.
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Matt Hoskins
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thumbsupExcellent review!

matt71 wrote:


Another point to keep in mind is removing opponents businesses out of the game and placing them in the bag. If you do this too much, you will actually be helping one opponent gain extra points at the end of the game. And it may just be enough points for an opponent to win.



One quick point, this only occurs with 3+ players. I found this game to be a bit dry with two, not neccessarily because of this. Overall I also like the game. I'm just not leaping to my gameshelf to grab this game for a 2-P session.
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Matt
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Thanks for pointing that out Matt. And thanks for the thumbs up on the review.

Oh geez, now I feel like I'm talking to myself.
 
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Matt Hoskins
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LOL!
 
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